What type/breed of goat is this?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by daytrader, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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  2. lazybee

    lazybee Active Member

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    This looks like a Nubian. We have a few and love them although they are the loudest "talkers" in our herd!
     

  3. Lemontreefarm

    Lemontreefarm Well-Known Member

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    Definately Nubian or mostly Nubian Cross!
     
  4. stacygoats

    stacygoats Well-Known Member

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  5. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    How big will her horns get? They just started growing last week. They seem to come in fast. She loves to be scratched behind her horns. I guess it feels good?

    She was so scared when we brought her home. I mean scared as heck. Any little noise she was off. Now, she is still jittery, but engines and the sounds of our farm do not bother her.

    I am thinking of breeding her. We do want to get her a friend. I also want to make sure she stays a pet. My wife loves her to death.

    All my wife asked for our anniversary was a got. That's it. She works with her every day. She now walks on a lease and goes into town on walks.

    Get this, she also likes to get lazy and WANTS to be picked up and carried.

    I tried to tell my wife that she will get much larger to were carrying will be very hard. She doesn't want to hear it.

    Now, on feed. I am an animal lover. This is not a production animal. So I feel feed her the best that money can buy. Am I hurting her doing this? I buy the best horse feed I can get with molasses. It is high protein. This shouldn't hurt her right? I mean she is a goat. She has bales of Orchard grass and alfalfa mix and gets to eat the fresh grasses she finds on walks as well.

    Not to mention all the bread, bagels and potato chips she gets.

    I know goats are friendly critters. I just never really took much care of them.

    I had Billy goats that got to gross for their owners. So I took them.

    I just ranged them and they drank a lot of beer with me.

    We literally had our last goat that you could not hold a beer can in the barn yard. He WOULD ram the hell out of you to get at it.

    I paid 30 bucks for this girl. Bottle fed. I think I got a deal. Or is that fair price?
     
  6. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

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    1) Feed. Goat Feed. Other feed is not recommended and may cause growth problems or death. Especially with young animals.

    2) Hay. Doesn't have to be great hay. Should have some browse in it if possible.

    3) People food. No. NO people food. ESPECIALLY NOT BREAD. SCOURS WILL KILL HER VERY QUICKLY AT THIS AGE.

    4) Nubian.

    5) Horns. Burn her horns off or you will regret it. Especially when your children find her hanging, dead, in a fence or other.

    6) Companion. Get her a companion or you won't be happy and neither will she.
     
  7. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    Very nice looking goat. Looks like a Nubian to Nubian/Boer mix. She is very cute..

    Good Luck with the goat..
     
  8. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Horns aren't really all that big of a deal in my opinion. I have 5 goats with them and never once have I had a problem in the 4 years of owning goats. Thats not very long but still, horns just don't seem to be as big of a problem as many people see it to be. You will have to take proper precautions such as good fencing and other safety measures, but that's pretty much it. Her horns will grow through out her life, and get longer and thicker as she ages. Good luck with her. she sure is pretty. I wish I could find a nubian doe like that nearby. All I can find is the same quality at 80.00 ea... :(
     
  9. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    On the horns: Do you know how old she is? They look too big to just burn off at this point. If you don't do it in the first week or two, it's too late. So I would get used to the horns.

    On feed: For goats that are not "production" (i.e. they're not milking or pregnant), I would just give hay and alfalfa pellets (if it's not alfalfa hay). If she's milking or bred, you can add grain on the milkstand. While she's still growing, some grain is good too. But don't overdo grain. Goat chow is not too good. You probably doing better with the horse feed then you would with goat chow. The less molasses, the better. Alfalfa pellets or alfalfa hay should be the main part of their diet. Whatever you do feedwise though, the most important thing is good loose minerals (no blocks). Have them out free-choice all the time.

    www.fiascofarm.com has a lot of good information to get your started.
     
  10. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    She is 8 weeks old. I am not concerned with the horns.

    The billy goats we had had horns and it was fun to watch them use them.

    I a not worried about being hurt by them, least of my consern.

    I guess I need to buy cheaper feed. I just figured better feed was always better. I was kinda worried with the protein levels.

    On human food. How will they kill her? I have fed scraps to goats for a long time. I never noticed any problems.

    Things like old bread, chips, veg peelings and such. I mean it is a goat. They will eat poisonus weeds that do not effect them.

    Our last Billy goat died of old age at 14 years. He would not eat good feed, only junk feed. Like ive and wood bark. He loved his beer.
     
  11. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Too much of human food is very bad for them, especially at once. They can cause bloat, which is VERY serious if not properly treated. I also feed everything that you stated (sept for the beer, which I would never do) but in small quantanties to ensure that they don't get sick. Never feed anything moldy as well.
     
  12. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    One thing I noticed. She is not much of a climber. I have some log chuncks and a climbing post for her. She dosn't use them.

    I HAD a plastic lawn chair for her to ram and play with. She just kicked it around. She didn't like it standing on its legs. I figured she would climb on it. The legs are broken off. She likes her plastic dog toy we gave her. It jingles when she paws at it.

    She started this pawing at you to pick her up. She is getting to big to pick up to much. Dosn't stop my wife.

    Have you ever seen a woman carry a goat around. Its funny as heck.
     
  13. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch Well-Known Member

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    Ivy and bark are not junk foods for goats - they're good food! Leaves and bark and browse are better roughage and are far higher in important trace minerals than grain and grass.

    Roughage is far more important than grain. Free choice alfalfa hay, and a little scoopful of grain once a day. Alfalfa is important for her right now as she's still growing. Veggie scraps and bread are fine - but don't give her so much that she isn't eating enough roughage (hay). They're dessert, not a main course.

    Your goat should have a quality free-choice loose mineral available, too - I like the Sweetlix 16:8 Meat Maker mineral. There are other brands out there, but be sure to use one labeled for goats or cattle, NOT sheep. There isn't enough copper in a sheep mineral.

    Different things are poisonous to different animals. Just because they can eat things that YOU can't doesn't meant they can eat "anything." My friend nearly lost her two to poisoning by letting them eat avocado leaves (highly toxic to horses, too). But a person could eat a treeful and never have a problem.

    Cheers!

    Katherine