What to plant after peas

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by steff bugielski, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I just pulled the last of the shell peas up. The spot has very nice loose fertile soil, a nice sturdy fence and gets a bit of shade in the afternoon. I am in zone 5.
    What can I plant in this spot now?
    I just planted a row of green beans on the snap pea fence so I don't need more of them.
     
  2. NickieL

    NickieL Accidental Farmer

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    spinach, maybe some chard?
     

  3. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I have never had any luck with spinach in the spring so maybe in the fall will work. Our spring usually last 24 hrs then summer.
     
  4. DoubleD

    DoubleD Well-Known Member

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    I usually transplant my fall planting of broccoli and cabbages right behind the pea patch. I get them started in June (inside under lights) so they are ready to go in the ground when I harvest the pea patch. Actually anything that has time to mature before the hard weather arrives will work - because peas leave the ground in such good shape they are a great opening act for just about anything you could want to grow behind it.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Plant compost! My pea row this year was a 190' long double row with 1,802 seeds and 8 varieties. (We have 8 gallons of blanched and frozen peas in 2 freezers!) Next time the surrounding area needs mowing, there will be one pass through the dead or dying pea vines. Then any late weeds will be taken care of with a hoe. After that, horse manure and shredded leaves will be spread. Whatever remains in early October will be plowed under. And, my 2012 pea row will again be 190' long if all goes as planned.

    I should add that I am not in favor of second crops on any but salad items. Anything with substantial dietary nutrients takes an awful lot of nutrients from the soil. Law of diminishing returns applies and is a constant. There are a number of vegetables which I may plant as a second crop but there's the bottom line of what is left after they are done. Since I am not a commercial grower in CA or TX who is trying to keep up with public demand for the same product 12 months per year, I go with what Sandra and I can use without having to bring in a lot of outside nutrients to support it. Dug a row of potatoes today. Not the slightest thought of planting anything else. Instead, fired up the Mantis tiller. Shredded leaves had been used as mulch between rows so I began working in organic matter for next year. We've harvested what we should expect in one season and anything taken from it later this year only leaves less for whatever is expected next year.

    Martin
     
  6. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What the heck does one do with that many peas? We have one 30' double row (one package of seeds), we get about 8 lbs of peas which takes the three of us about an hour to shell, and we still have peas in the freezer from last year.
     
  7. SquashNut

    SquashNut Well-Known Member

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    Last year i planted things our rabbits could eat. Peas plants carrots and turnips. We dud eat some of the carrots and turnips our selves. But the peas never did produce any thing other than tiny pods.
     
  8. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    We happen to like peas! Years ago, would get a big pile of vines from a field and spend hours picking and shelling. Then they were canned. Still a lot of peas grown around here but pea viners are mobile now and thus no windrows to grab all that one can carry. Besides, some growers not as willing to share as back then.

    Anyway, always wanted to have enough room to grow as many as I would like an the overall total came to be because I bought a packet each of 8 different varieties to see which ones did the best. With different maturity dates, the picking was spread out over about 3 weeks and thus not one big session. I would have canned about a third of them but we like them frozen much better and had the freezer space.

    Planning to cut back to about 1,000 plants next year and only 2 varieties. The 8 which were grown this year were Alaska, Dakota, Early Frosty, Freezonian, Green Arrow, Progress No. 9, Maestro, and Wando. Green Arrow and Maestro are the two scheduled for 2012 due to their production and easy shelling.

    Martin
     
  9. frankva

    frankva Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Less deer meat, more peas.:)

    I like them on salad. They thaw quick.
     
  10. NickieL

    NickieL Accidental Farmer

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    I prefer the pea pod type but they don't freeze too well for me :(