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How clean it is is probably one of the most important things. The least amount of Vegetable Matter means a lot less time pulling VM out of your spinning fiber.

What do you want to do with it? Different fleeces are for different purposes. I have some Merino fleeces which are usually spun fine and used for making things that will be worn next to the skin. There's also the Clun Forest hybrid fleece (a hair sheep got in with the flock a generation ago so this particular fleece has some hair in it) which I spin really chunky and make into wonderful rugs. There's all sorts of other fleeces and fibers in between those two. So, depending on what you want to do with it, one fleece might be much better than another.

How does it feel in your fingers? Get a fleece you like the feel and look of, getting one that doesn't feel good to you isn't going to be helpful when you spend hours working with it.

To just begin on the processing a fleece learning curve, I'd select a fleece that has pretty open fibers and a bit less lanolin than a fleece such as a Merino would have.

What are your choices?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I don't ready have any idea what would the final product will be. I get learned how to process churro in a Thursday class a few weeks ago and I bought some hand carders.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would probably roll them in to rolags and practice long draw, but the main thing would be to process it without felting it.
 

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I recommend getting a fairly inexpensive one to begin with so you wont be too worried about "ruining" it.

There are just too many choices, I know. :teehee:


How about Romney? That is a versatile type of wool, has some crimp and lanolin, but not tons of either.
Cant go wrong with a pile of raw Romney wool. :)
 

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Fleece from the Down breeds of sheep (Southdown, Columbia, Hampshire, etc) is really difficult to felt, so really easy to wash and process.

Nice and sproingy, perfect for spinning long draw!

Usually inexpensive too, as they are, IMHO, under appreciated breeds. :)
 

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Yeah, I want to get my hands on a Down fleece at some point, too! There's some out grazing in a field not to far from here, but I've not gone and knocked on their door yet to see what they do with the fleeces.
 

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Avoid second cuts, one of my biggest pet peeves. those are the little short bits of fiber that come from the shearer going obver the sheep one more time in an effort to make her look good. Those little bits are horrible to deal with.

I think you have some good advice here. I will second GAM's idea of using Romney fleece, easy to spin, not too much lanolin, and lots of wool (they are big sheep). It's also my favorite :D
 
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