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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think we are getting a LGD 6 week old puppy. It is quite cold here. What are the best choices for where it should stay?

Its job will be to tend to the goats, but it will be way too young yet to do that right? and won't the goats beat up on it? We have five doelings it will be with eventually. What is the best way to train it?

Should we keep it in the house for a bit and take it out with me to do chores or what? Any experience would be greatly appreciated.

thanks
downhome
 

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6 weeks is about 2 weeks too early, but that's another topic.

I'd make a "house " in the barn out of hay bales, and have lots of loose hay inside for it to burrow into. If the pup can see and smell the goats, but cant get to them , it would be ideal.
You'll need to be there for the first "introductions". If you can rig up an area so the pup can get away from the goats when it feels insecure, then it wont take it long to catch on.
I would NOT start bringing the dog inside. LGD's can handle cold far better than heat as long as they have a place out of the wind.

The dog needs to be with the goats as early as possible, but dont expect it to be much protection until it's at LEAST 6 months old, and keep in mind it's STILL a PUPPY until it's about 2 years old

Here are some more helpful tips, and I'd urge you to WAIT until the pup is at LEAST 8 weeks old if possible:
http://www.bountifulfarm.com/lgd_seminar.htm
 

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Lost in the Wiregrass
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DO NOT take it into the house and treat it like a normal pup, it needs to live out in the barn, if it bonds to you and the house it wont guard the goats, basic obedience is all you need, simple things like NO and STOP and COME, other than that an LGD is bred to do a job that cant be traind it just is, the more you try and mess with it the more problems you have,

but yes i agree 6 weeks is WAY WAY too young, especially for an LGD, they need to be around their working parrents and the rest of their litter to help give them a good start on what they are MENT to do,
 

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Don't take it in the house :) You can ruin a good guard dog that way and it takes a lot of effort to fix it.

When mine was a pup I tried putting her in the barn but the goats weren't happy and picked on her. I finally made a separate place for her.

 

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6 weeks is about 2 weeks too early, but that's another topic.

I'd make a "house " in the barn out of hay bales, and have lots of loose hay inside for it to burrow into. If the pup can see and smell the goats, but cant get to them , it would be ideal.
You'll need to be there for the first "introductions". If you can rig up an area so the pup can get away from the goats when it feels insecure, then it wont take it long to catch on.
I would NOT start bringing the dog inside. LGD's can handle cold far better than heat as long as they have a place out of the wind.

The dog needs to be with the goats as early as possible, but dont expect it to be much protection until it's at LEAST 6 months old, and keep in mind it's STILL a PUPPY until it's about 2 years old

Here are some more helpful tips, and I'd urge you to WAIT until the pup is at LEAST 8 weeks old if possible:
http://www.bountifulfarm.com/lgd_seminar.htm
Great Post! Completely agree. Just want to add that putting a board across the top of the straw bales helps trap heat in and also allows the puppy to have a little "cave". 6 weeks is too early - can you wait that extra 1 or 2 weeks?
 

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Great Post! Completely agree. Just want to add that putting a board across the top of the straw bales helps trap heat in and also allows the puppy to have a little "cave". 6 weeks is too early - can you wait that extra 1 or 2 weeks?
I've always just used hay bales for the roof also, and formed, as you say, a "cave". The space only needs to be large enough for the dog to enter and turn around.
Most LGD breeds were developed in mountainous areas with LOTS of cold weather, and they have coats evolved for it.
One of my dogs, Beau, has such a thick coat that I've never been able to find skin to apply Frontline

www.dogbreedinfo.com/maremmasheepdog.htm
 

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Kathy
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Yep I would wait till its 8 wks old and if you can get it a buddy, like a sister or brother. Thats what I did when I got mine is I went for 1 and came home with 2. This way they didnt howl or cry all night as they had a sibling to sleep with.
 

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Metal melter
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Isn't 6 weeks a bit young to be taken from the mother? Is there a chance that it could stay with her for another 2 weeks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is possible I misunderstood the age of the puppy. They have already sold a couple and this breed seems to go pretty fast around here. If by chance it is six weeks what should we do with it for two weeks?
 

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YOU wouldnt need to do anything different, other than maybe feeding soft foods at first, but it's FAR better for the pup to spend those 2 weeks learning from it's mom. From 8-16 weeks they will do a LOT of their "bonding" and it's important they be with the animals they will be protecting during that period.
It's also the time to start simple things like "sit" , "stay" and "come", but DON"T expect any LGD to be as obedient as a "pet" breed. They were developed to be independent.
 

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Just keep it warm and well-fed. Goats' milk is best, perhaps soaked in some rolled oats with some raw eggs/salt/wheat germ. Pups this age can eat a raw chicken drumstick or neck. Helps develop their jaws and neck muscles too.

The puppy will be fine - studies have shown, however, that week 6 to 7 is a very important time for puppies to learn correct dog behavior - how to interact with each other etc. But if it can't be helped, then the dog will still grow up just fine. Not ideal though, from nutrition and mental development standpoints. But ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

And one puppy alone will be fine. Our cats snuggle up with baby goats and puppies, especially if it is a nice warm spot.
 

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Yep I would wait till its 8 wks old and if you can get it a buddy, like a sister or brother. Thats what I did when I got mine is I went for 1 and came home with 2. This way they didnt howl or cry all night as they had a sibling to sleep with.

Here is a great website for G.Pyr. I strongly recommend against getting a littermate. :duel: The rivalry can be intense, and it lasts a lifetime.

http://www.sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library.htm#behavior
Paul
 

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Kathy
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Downhome if you decide to wait I have 6 GP/Anatolian mix pups that will be ready to leave at the end of January...Just let me know.
 

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I was really surprised when I was talking to great pyrenees breeders that a LOT of them seem to sell puppes as early as 5 weeks!! Which seemed VERY early to me... we ended up reserving a maremma puppy who we'll be picking up this weekend/coming week depending on the weather, who will be a lil over 8 weeks.
 

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I was really surprised when I was talking to great pyrenees breeders that a LOT of them seem to sell puppes as early as 5 weeks!! Which seemed VERY early to me... we ended up reserving a maremma puppy who we'll be picking up this weekend/coming week depending on the weather, who will be a lil over 8 weeks.
You made a WISE choice!
 
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