What to do for newborn calf?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by jimandpj, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. jimandpj

    jimandpj Well-Known Member

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    We've had baby goats born before - but this is our first experience with calving. Our new jersey cow looks like she will have her calf any day now. Other than making sure the baby gets colostrum ASAP, do we need to do anything for the calf once it arrives? Bo-Se shot? dip umbilical cord? I've got all my goat kidding supplies, anything special I need to have for calving?

    Thanks!
    PJ
     
  2. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    Usually you don't have to do anything but watch. :) Is this your cow's first calf?
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No shots, no cord dipping. Our calves are born outside on a clean pasture no matter the weather, its better that way as long as they get their colostrum and get dry. Just stand back and watch them grow! :)
     
  4. jimandpj

    jimandpj Well-Known Member

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    Oh good, that's a big relief. I keep feeling "unprepared", but can't find anything to get ready! :rolleyes:

    This is her 3rd calf. She came from a dairy. She had mastitis and now has a blind quarter, so they decided to sell her. She has the most wonderful disposition, and we can't wait for her milk and cream!!

    PJ
     
  5. cindy04

    cindy04 Well-Known Member

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    This is an awsome site, www.real-food.com (same as the family cow).We pick up new info all the time. Keeping an eye on the cow may be your biggest concern (milk fever). You can read all sorts of good stuff for days on this site and the members are the BEST.
    Good luck
    Cindy
     
  6. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    jersey calves are small, and are suseptible to hypothermia. Watch for out especially if its a damp cold. If the mother wont object I would get her up to where the baby can be shelter if its tending to be rainy. Or just keep an eye out to see that it IS nursing. Make sure calf is getting up. And if it is make sure its not scouring a jersey in her third lactation should produce alot more than the calf can eat, which CAN cause scours.

    Also a blind quarter doesnt always stay dry, my oldest gurl had two bad ones, that produce plenty now. only problem is those teats aren't stretched like the front 2, so it is harder to milk them.