what states have homesteading

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lovewriter, Aug 22, 2004.

what states have homesteading

  1. montana

  2. south dakota

  3. new mexico

  4. arizona

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  1. lovewriter

    lovewriter Member

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    My husband and I want to know how to find out what states have home steading? How if any money do you have to have up front? Can you start out with a trailor on the land till u can get a house built, or are there any with a house already on it? what about jobs in that area? do you have to farm the land or can you do a bed and breakfast or hunting cabins on the land? So on.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    None have what I think you are thinking about, but you can do everything you suggested in several states. Most often it requires a down payment and you become a payment paying property owner.
     

  3. jerneeon

    jerneeon Well-Known Member

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    Uncle Wil, what states would that be? The ones listed in the poll? Or are there others?
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I 'spect he means any state that has private property ownership and a bank that'll loan money on a mortgage.
     
  5. Land is still available for well under $1000 per acre for small (1 to 2 acre) lots, if you look in the right places.

    Hint: Look for inexpensive property with a high probabality of finding shallow groundwater (under 100 feet).
     
  6. as far as i know there is no state or nation giving free land in exchange for improvements. It may be working some of the farm welfare programs are almost the equivelant. If you go where nobody wants to live you can get cheap land it probably means no work anywhere near and little or no farming value. often it will not be tillable or have water. the cheapest land may be to find tax forclosure sales but if the land has much value for farming or development the locals will bid it up to close to value, sometimes even over value if it adjoins their operation as most farmers tend to expand or die.
     
  7. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Free land is no longer available in the USA.

    CHEAP land, however, is. Try www.unitedcountry.com as a starting place. They specialize in properties that are inexpensive. They have parcels that are good, but not great. For example, I saw one just the other day. It was a perfectly good, newish house on one acre, fenced, in Oklahoma near a city.

    The drawback was that it was on a busy street, next to a business. No doubt this is why it was inexpensive.

    Perfect for commuting, of course.
     
  8. There is good land available inexpensively with water. Look in the northeastern Nevada area, along I-80 near Elko and Montillo in particular. That area is in the "great basin", where rain water that falls there doesn't leave. Groundwater at 50 feet is not unusual there.

    Don't ever give-up searching for your dream, and don't become a slave to a mortgage!
     
  9. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Yes. Jus be carefull. Some of those have you bidding on the down payment unstead of the purchase price. ALWAYS read the fine print!
     
  10. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    There is no homesteading anywhere in the US, the program was shutdown years ago. Cheap land is cheap because no one wants it. It is either unfit for agriculture , in a terminally depressed area, or miles and tens of thousands of dollars away from services such as access roads. If you don't have an independant income, you are not going to find cheap land and a job to support it.
     
  11. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    That sort of depends on how much you have saved over the years, and what you consider cheap. With no land payment or a small land payment, your job does not have to pay as well for you to live comfortably. Just remember that everywhere you live, you will need SOME money coming in!
     
  12. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    Marquette Kansas and others offered "urban homesteading" as a means to get people to move into their towns. One towns offer consisted of a house and 1 acre in exchange for living there for 5 years. An I.T. guy I knew tried for it since his work was all on the net from home and he wanted to get as far away from his ex wife as possible. Marquette apparently is only offering builable lots with sewer and water.

    Heres a link to the article in March of this year

    http://www.nbc4i.com/news/2945960/detail.html
     
  13. Absolutely untrue. As I said in a previous post, NE Nevada has lots of great deals on property. Take the town Elko for example. There is work in the area, shallow groundwater and property can be purchased inexpensively. Here is an ebay auction to illustrate what I mean:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=15841&item=4319708758&rd=1

    At the time of this post the auction has three days left and the bid price is at $775. I would expect this auction to close for no more than $1200 for this 1 acre lot, and maybe it will close for under $1000. I am familiar with this subdivision. The location has power available and it is freeway close, just over 10 miles from town. Larger lots are available for much less $/acre prices.

    That auction is not unusual for the area. There are a variety of similar bargains available in NE Nevada.
     
  14. I was in nevada once they have some skinny cows out there. there is a cattle gaurd on ech side of the state and i think they graze 10 head on a good year what is rainfall under 10 inches in a wet year? I would look at any land on e-bay before buying it as e-bay is notorious as a dumping ground for items you can't sell if they see them. Also do your own checking for road acess utility availability taxes or other fees and potential to grow anything as i never see the word tillable on those land auctions so if you intend to plant anything beware it is not rock or chalk or totally barren in some way.
     
  15. You should look at ANY land before buying, regardless if it was found at eBay, in a newspaper or through a realtor. The same is true for researching the property yourself. That just makes sense.

    I have visited that lot location and the access roads are good. The first 10 miles are on I-80, then 2 miles of paved road, and finally about 1/2 mile of well-groomed gravel road. Not bad for a rural lot.

    Your climate description is more typical of southern Nevada than northern Nevada. Rainfall in Elko averages over 10 inches. It is true that most agriculture in the area is done with irrigation, but that is offset with shallow groundwater.

    Your analysis seems to be based more on some prejudice towards eBay than based on fact. Don't assume that a property os bad just because it is listed at eBay.
     
  16. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Have you ever heard the saying that what is one man's meat, is another man's poisen? Remember that what would suit you very well, may not suit other folks at all. That is why some land is very cheap.

    For example, last summer I bought 5 acres just 20 minutes away. It was priced at 1/3 less than the going price for the area.

    The REASON that it was priced so reasonalbly was because it did not have city water, and none would be available for at LEAST 3 years. This meant that those people who were looking for a city-type home would look elsewhere.

    But, for me it is not really a problem as it has a creek running through it, and I wanted it for agricultural purposes. Instead of paying the city $3000 for a water meter, I am instead considering setting up a battery-operated pump to lift the water 5' to where the plants will be. It is a spring-fed creek on the neighbors ground, and he doesn't farm. II don't thing the water will be contaminated with herbicides or pesticides. Meanwhile, it is providing my honey bees with water.(In this area, you don't have to water during the entire growing season. Just to make sure seedlings get a chance to develove a good root system, and perhaps once a month during a dry spell).

    By the time I build up my business to where I need more water than the creek can provide (and I am not allowed to take it all, of course. I must not dry up the downstream neighbors pond.), city water should be available. By then, I hope that the sale of blackberries, honey, and veggies will have more than paid for the meter.

    So, a major problem for a home-builder is a plus for me, because it saved me $10,000 on the purchase, which made the land affordable. And, by the time I need more water, it should be available, and paid for as well.
     
  17. True enough, these kinds of lots aren't going to make everyone happy. If you are looking for heavily wooded areage, for example, then this wouldn't be right for you.

    However, this land does address the posibility of an inexpensive place to start a modern homestead, free from mortgages without having to save a small fortune.
     
  18. lovewriter

    lovewriter Member

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    Ok if you have to pay for the property then why would it be called homesteading then? I know this may sound like a stupid question, but I am new at this.

    I guess it looks like I will never have my dream come true. There is no way my husband and I could ever do it money wise our selves. Sorry for the spelling.

    I thank you all for trying to help me.
     
  19. i understand what you are saying the term homesteading does not really mean what it used to or does it? the old meaning of giving a parcel in exchange for specified improvements is gone in the USA as far as i know. I am not sure but i have never heard of any other more developing nations offering that either.. Most see it as meaning the ability to develop a new property build up some improvements sometimes turn some new sod and plant some new plants.