What Size Barn???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oldmanriver, Dec 3, 2004.

  1. oldmanriver

    oldmanriver Well-Known Member

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    I have the lumer from a old house we took down now ready to build a barn What is a good size for a starter. 3 or 4 goats 1 cow and calf also need a corn crib and feed, tack room, Will a 24 by 24 with loaf work>. What height is the first level of your barn and would you change if you could?
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a big old 1909 barn, 3 machine sheds, 2 old critter barns, a corn crib with machine storage in the middle, and a few little buildings. Of course, I am actually farming with 40 cattle & such....

    Every single one is full, & too small for my new stuff that I get.

    Plan big. Build it even bigger. And have a clear site in mind for the next building, when this one gets full....

    --->Paul
     

  3. kjerckie

    kjerckie Well-Known Member

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    I had a 24x24 pole building built three years ago. I outgrew it in two months. Whatever size you think you'll need now, triple it.
     
  4. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    Amen brother!! We started with a 30 x 54 pole barn. Now that is just the front part of the 100 x 300 behind it, which has a 10 foot ceiling and a second floor that runs 100 x 250. Now I think we're OK now but what a waste that first 30 x 54 was in the long run.
     
  5. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    What is the saying about junk accumulating to fill the space available for it?

    I allow a handicapped man to come fishing in my pond when he wants as it is wheelchair accessible. Am thus passing friends with his family. From his mother's house, in the last year, I have already hauled off for them two chest freezers, two washing machines, two kitchen stoves, a upright piano, an upright soda vending machine and something else, which escapes me. She called yesterday asking if I could come today to haul off about the same amount from their detached one-car garage. Garage also includes an old couch, which she asked if I wanted for my own use. Nooooooooo.

    Some people are incapable of discarding anything, apparently on the philosophy they might need it some day. My own is unless I have a fairly assured use for it within a reasonable length of time it goes.

    Thus, it would somewhat depend on how much of an accumulator you are. Look around your house. If you have lots of room and everything is in good order, chances are you can get by with a fairly small building. If you have to walk through aisleways and have stacks threating to have an avalance, then build as large as possible since it will soon look the same.

    Ken Scharabok

    P.S. Go to www.half.com and search in books for the search words of barn* design* or barn* plan*. You will find a fair number of books devoted to this subject. Pick one with a lot of designs and mix and match to suit your needs. My only suggest is as much as possible should be accessible from a center aisleway.
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............I, just picked up a written estimate for the metal and support beams for a 40' x 40' metal bldg., 15' sides, 1-12'x14' door , 1-4'x7'metal entry door . There will also be a 20' x 30' covered parking on one side of the bldg. . .....total cost plus sales tax was $14,000 . This is no labor and NO slab . A 1600 sq. foot slab would run about 4\ft. or 6,400 and labor to erect the building would run about 3\ft. or so . So , the estimated total cost would be....14,000+6,400+4,800(40x40) ,+(20x30x2=)1200 parking which means it would cost about 26,400 to have it erected . :eek: ..fordy... :)
     
  7. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    Whatever size you plan on ... it probably needs to be bigger :haha:

    You might think flexible, too. We built a pole-barn/tramp shed for cattle and horses in 1998 but here 5-6 years later it was full of chickens. Who knew! And it's not really well-suited for chickens -- too high and wide open.

    If you can't build it all at once, maybe try to built something multi-purpose in such a shape that it could be added onto later. Our shed slopes up at the front (faces south) with the idea being we'd put the other half on later. Whenever that is ...

    Buildings evolve quite a bit ... DH's folks have 1900s bank barn which had a milking stable added and horse stalls taken out in the 1940s ... two small concrete silos built on in front in the 1950s ... replaced by a Harvestore and augers all over the place because they had hogs and chickens in the next building north, which started as a corn crib, then was a layer house, then a lean-to added for hogs, which were replaced by dairy calves. The old layer house north of THAT was cemented for hogs, then they jacked it up and put in higher concrete sides, a new roof, concrete lot and head gates for weanie beef calves. Back at the bank barn in 1988 they added a larger upright silo, with unloader and silage bunk in a concrete lot. Now full of beef cattle since the dairy cows were sold in 2003. So ... it seems like any improvement or addition will change purposes in 15 to 20 years ... hmmm .... (As far as all those silo's ... well, we NEVER thought we would not be milking cows.)

    Whatever you build, you can't beat having running water and electric out there :):

    Good luck!
    Ann
     
  8. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    Whatever area you go with, don't go with less than a 10' ceiling. You'll need it to get proper ventilation for the animals. We have a 70X160 barn that's about 4 different barns put together, and a 50x140 naturally ventilated freestall barn.
     
  9. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..........................I , know what you mean about getting Rid of your "stuff" . I've been selling my excess stuff here for the last 6 months. I'm going to try and keep all my essential tools for building and the construction of whatever structures I decide that I need once I actually buy land in a different location , which I anticipate will be TOO far , from Here , for me to transport any personal items other than the essentials that I will need to start over . I , just hate all this "not knowing" business . As , I really haven't madeup my mind as to where I want to relocate . And , realistically , I can't start moving from Here until "Here" is actually sold . So , I'm left with "stewing" in my own juice(s) and not being able to get outside during these cold days just drives me bonkers anyway ...fordy... :)
     
  10. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am a farmer, & I love going to farm auction sales.... I'm really quite good about _not_ buying extra stuff.

    But, it is fun to listen to the auctioneers, they joke about remembering selling that same box of xxx for the third time now, or a box of parts 'so it can sit in your shed for the next 20 years' and so on.

    Pretty funny stuff.

    --->Paul
     
  11. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    design the building as to be multipurpose for various animals.... in other words a 12x12 stall can be divded into 2 6x12's for smaller animal use and the dividers taken out ifyou need for arge animals down the pike as you might need room and not have funds for another stucture handy at the time....

    Shed roof construction is good and can be added onto easy if planned on the right spot of ground. Also easy to put up in my opinion.

    lofts are ok, but require more investment of stouter wood, and as a person gets older stairs are harder to climb and 60 pound bales of hay gets heavier each year too, not to mention sacks of feed.... and what goes up has to come down sometime too. 55 gallon barrels for storing grain, chest freezers or old refrigerators on their backs can be as well..... which can in a pinch be outside in the weather. Growingup we had a 20x64 gable barnwith a 13foot shed on one side..... should have been 16 cause we had mostly cattle under it, but the 20x64 housed about 70 ton of hay a couple years as it was 16 foot to the eaves.

    Dad also built it so he could pile silage in it ergo the 16 foot hieght with 8 foot sidewalls, which I really would not recomend to everyone, but it worked for us at the time.

    Again as a builder i would keep it one story, and in 12 foot increments, stalls and walkways, make it so access to waterlines are easy, and put electric in it whether grid or off grid using a battery, you will be in the barn after dark more nights than not. As for a tack room, build a separate barn for that cause the barn you have for animals will be full of animals and feed.

    William
     
  12. 2horses

    2horses I'm a silly filly!! Supporter

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    Whatever you build, make sure you factor drainage into the picture. Build the barn up as much as you can so that all contents, be they animal or whatever, stay high and dry, even when the monsoons blow in.

    Also factor in ventilation. My barn was built with the long walls facing north and south, and the aisleway runs east and west (was built long before I owned it). Here on the Gulf coast, the prevailing summer breezes are normally out of the southeast. So if I could, I would rotate my barn 90 degrees, and have the aisleway running north and south, to take advantage of the summer breeze. As it stands now, not much air moves through there in the summer and it gets pretty warm. A roof vent would be nice, too. So take orientation and ventilation into consideration as well.

    Just my 2 cents worth...

    Pam :cool:
     
  13. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    If you will be using a Bobcat or something similar to clean out ... be sure the doors are tall enough and wide enough. In our shed if the bedding is piled high DH has to sort of dig his way in :)