What shrubs/flowers can I plant in a wet area?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ravenlost, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a large area that runs the length of my garage (front of house between garage and brick sidewalk) that holds water. When it rains the roof drains into this area. In the summer it will dry out, but there's a water spigot there I can use to keep things watered.

    What can I plant here that will grow successfully? I planted a rose there last Spring and had to move it as it was much to wet. I need ideas!
     
  2. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Water cress, any lily that can be planted in a pond?
     

  3. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    You don't say how much sun (but imply a good amount if you tried a rose there). Try Cannas there. They'll work with wet feet (and when it drys out too). I planted some in a area one time that I just stepped on them to plant (bare footed) but it was so wet I couldn't even dig!

    There are some real interesting colors now too (both flowers and leaves including varigated leaves).

    The same area I also planted some Mexican Petunias (sorry don't know the latin name and they aren't actually petunias as they grew 2 1/2 3 feet high).

    Pat
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This area gets full morning sun. I would like a mix of shrubs and flowers...some things that will look good in winter too. And low maintenance of course!
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    there are many ornamental grasses that look nice year round and are pet safe . one plant to steer away from is the high bush crannberrie looks nice in foliage has nice red berries for the birds, loves wet feet but boy does it stink when the leaves die off!! what about some raised planter boxes for annuels?
     
  6. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

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    Cedar trees grow well in wet areas, plus they stay green all year. You can prune them so that they will be bushy once they get big enough.

    I love the look of ornamental grasses, they too look great during those winter months.

    Mandy
     
  7. Phantomfyre

    Phantomfyre Black Cat Farm Supporter

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    I was going to suggest beardless irises - Siberian, Japanese, Louisiana, versicolor or virginica, but morning sun might not be enough. They need at least 6 hours of full sun a day to bloom well.

    How about winterberry bushes? They can take shade and wet.

    Spiderwort would work and has purple blooms. Can take shady conditions.

    Sweet violets will grow about anywhere. I had a wet, shady spot at our previous house, and I let the violets fill in as a groundcover there. The shade was from a large sycamore tree, and in the spring before the violets filled in, the white roots were a lovely contrast to the fresh green leaves and purple bloooms. I put a few large pieces of white quartz rock amongst them, and it was quite lovely. A few ferns, too.

    Diana
     
  8. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That sounds lovely Phantomfyre. The wild violets are starting to bloom here and I do plan to transplant some of them. This area gets at least six full hours of sun in the summer. Iris is a good idea.

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions!
     
  9. Phantomfyre

    Phantomfyre Black Cat Farm Supporter

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    You're welcome! If you go with irises, make sure you do not get bearded irises - they cannot tolerate wet feet. The beardless ones can be harder to find - if you decide to try some and cannot find a source, shoot me an email or PM. For more info on the beardless types, check out:

    For Siberians: http://www.socsib.org/
    For Louisianas: http://www.louisianas.org/
    For Japanese: http://www.socji.org/

    All of these prefer acid soil, which in most areas, is not a problem. Alkaline soils, however, can kill them. They like to stay moist - mulching will help in the summer. Siberians are likely your best bet for an area that dries out in the summer, and they will also be the easiest of the 3 to find. :)

    Iris nut, signing off. :D
    Diana
     
  10. elle

    elle Member

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    Hi, Try Daylilys they will grow anywhere,come in all colors and they spread,come back every year and you don't have to dig them up and store them for winter