What reloading equipment?

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by wy_white_wolf, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    The "Does anyone reload?" thread has got me thinking again that this is something I'd like to try. So for a person that knows nothing about reloading, what equipment would you recomend to start? Are the reloading kits very complete? What are they missing? What should I stay away from? I've never really trusted salesman's advise as they only seem to suggest what they sell.

    I would only need 2 calibers (.243 and Rem 7mm mag) to start out with. Only forsee myself getting 1 more rifle (a .223) and don't ever see myself getting a shotgun or pistol.
     
  2. ovendoctor

    ovendoctor north of the lift bridge

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    Hi,first thing to get is a good reloading manual.
    lyman or speer whould be two that I whould start with.
    both are packed with more info thain I can type in a week

    happy reloading

    :hobbyhors
     

  3. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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  4. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here's a short list

    1. Lyman or Speers or one of the many other reloading manuals.
    2. Reloader (RCBS, Lyman, Dillion just to name a few)
    3. Dies for the caliber to be reloaded.
    4. Powder scale
    5. powder trickler
    6. either a micrometer or a gauge to check length of shell
    7. case/shell trimmer
    8. depending on the dies you may need case lube and pad.
    9. a good solid work bench to mount the reloader on.

    Like I said this is just a short list and I would start with the reloading manuals
     
  5. Bwana

    Bwana Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    I'd say this kit would be a good starter kit for the money. Looks like it has everything you need except the dies for you cartridge(s) and a loading manual. The press is aluminum but for that kind of price, how can you go wrong? I know I've always trusted Lee products.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=149097

    Here's another from Lyman;

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=548480

    And this kit from RCBS;

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=646599

    And finally, this kit from Hornady. Notice how they keep going up in price.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=749997

    Any one of these kits would be good, though I think the Hornady and RCBS kits are the most complete and of the highest quality...should last a lifetime and beyond. Another thing I like about the Hornady is the lock-n-load method of changing dies. Haven't used one but from what I can see, the dies don't have to be threaded in or out of the press, just unlock, twist and pull out. I recall seeing that Hornady makes a conversion for RCBS Rock Chucker presses so they can take advantage of that too! Good shootin' & loadin'! :)

    Dave
     
  6. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    A Lee hand primer will make that primer setting job alot easier and faster. WEAR safety glasses.
     
  7. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    If you're only going to do one or two calibers, check out the Lee loaders. They're a kit that is only good for one caliber, but you have everything you need to load that one caliber for less than $20. There very simple, but they do work very well.
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Get a good kit and you wont regret it. I like the RCBS. And the Lee hand primer is a real time saver. Priming with the press is slow and the results arent that good. Get lots of different manuals and experiment with lots of different loads Youll be amazed at the difference in accuracy. A case trimmer is also a good thing to have that sometimes doesnt come with the kits. Midsouth Shooters Supply has good prices as does Midway Reloading. The reloading can be almost as much fun as the shooting. Also a case tumbler is a great accessory that doesnt always come with a kit. Lyman makes good accessories.
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I'd vote for the reloading manuals first & a good bit of research. I was taught reloading by my Granddad & my Dad...in a hands-on situation. I think that there are probably videos or DVDs available. Be careful! It can be dangerous! I have Lyman,Dillion,Lee,& RCBS equipment.
     
  10. NJ Rich

    NJ Rich NJ Rich

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    A agree with the advice to buy reloading books and reading the info they provide. I have Lyman and Speer reloading books that I can't find right now. It has been years since I reloaded. The places I hunted ground hogs have large expensive homes on them and there are few places close by that I can shoot a rifle to hunt. NJ required a speciial license to use a rifle to hunt varmits, at least it did when I hunted, and that use was limited. My interest have turned to bass fishing.

    I still have all my equipment and empty brass for several calibers of rifle and pistol bullets. I would suggest that you buy good dependible equipment. This is not an area to buy a low budget press and dies. I have RCBS equipment and have never had any problems with the ammo I turned out. By reloading your own ammo you can make a bullet that performs "with your firearm".

    My .243 Sako heavy barrel rifle shot best with Lyman suggested starting load and that was the load recommended for accuracy. Forget the idea that a faster bullet is a better bullet. Hot loads are not always better loads.

    Again I agree with the advice to read about reloading first and talk with people who do reload. Go to a range if you can and talk with shooters about what they use. You don't have to buy the most expensive equiptment but good quality tools work best usually.
     
  11. LindaVistaFarm

    LindaVistaFarm Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Lee reloader years ago and got great service from it. After several moves it got misplaced so I went out and bought a new one. $68.00 and well worth the little price. I was a Marine Corps sniper in VN and I really like to squeez out every bit of velocity and accruacy from my loads. You can go out and spend a couple hundred dollars on a brand name press but it won't do any better a job than the Lee. I now have a Lee Turrent press for my pistol calibers and love it. I am gonna get a Lee set up for my 50BMG. Good luck and first of all before you do anything, go and get some books from the library on reloading and study them from front to back. Always load up the max for any round and never exceed the max load as stated in the reloading manuals.

    I now shoot 1000 yard matches and I use my cheap Lee Reloader as some people call them, and I will spank most if not all the shooters at the range. I shoot a $4,000.00 custome rifle that the loads were loaded on a $68.00 press. And I beat guys that have reloading outfits costing over 2/3 thousand. I have about $500.00 in all of my equipment except my digital scales and my dies. I do buy the best dies I can and my digital scales cost more than the computer that I have it pluged into. There are areas that you can buy cheap but there are areas that you have to spend the money. If you just want to shoot cheaper ammo and get a little more accuracy from your rifle/pistol, then you can purchase everything you need for $300.00 and reload some fine rounds. Any, way good luck and please be careful. :hobbyhors

    Johnny
     
  12. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    Look at the 2 posts above mine. Rich says hot loads are not always better loads. Johnny says always load up to the max for any round.

    That just proves that you should never believe everything somebody tells you about reloading. In fact, don't believe anything somebody tells you. Get a reloading manual, or four, and study them. Believe them. I'm not knocking either guy above, just using them as examples. I've been reloading 30 years and don't claim to know everything, but I've heard plenty of things that make me shudder.

    If you want to go cheap, I've had good luck with a Lee hand press. I used to take one of them and scales and a Lee hand primer on prairie dog shoots and I would load up the empties in the motel at night. I wore out one press and bought a new one, actually I broke the handle full length sizing 7 STW. For a beginner, stick with a single stage press. My Dillon is fun, but I know what is going on at each station at the same time, and a beginner would get real confused. Everybody makes good single stage presses, pick one. Get a good powder measure. Use loads that take up most of the case volume so you can't double charge. Look in each case for powder before you ram in a bullet. Don't have any distractions around while learning, like curious kids. My friend blew up a Model 700 because of that. Have fun.
     
  13. LindaVistaFarm

    LindaVistaFarm Well-Known Member

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    I guess I wrote it wrong. I didn't mean to load all at max. I ment to load your rounds up to the max but never over the max. But it isn't necessary to load at the max. I load to the velosicity I want and the accuracy. Most times it is not the max load but something close to it. I hunt with a 300H&H magnum. For bear I have a load close to max with a 220 grain bullet. When I go after deer, I load a 175 grain bullet with alot less charge.
     
  14. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't busting you, just using you for an example. There is nothing unsafe about a max load, it's just a max load. If it was unsafe, it would be over maximum. I found out if I am always pushing a gun to the max, I just build myself a bigger gun. Works great and keeps the gun safe nice and full.
     
  15. LindaVistaFarm

    LindaVistaFarm Well-Known Member

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    LOL any excuse for a new rifle or shotgun or even a new pistol. Well now I am buying barrels for my Encore. Figure by the time T/C comes out with a new model I will have collected all, I think about 300 different chamberings they have out. T/C and all the aftermarket chamberings you can get for an Encore. I have 3 right now ( 17HMR, 223, 308). I got a long way to go.

    Johnny
     
  16. jross

    jross swamper

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    Good one WIHH. My idea of muzzleloading is stating that my 20 ga is loaded and has a muzzle.
     
  17. Wildtim

    Wildtim Well-Known Member

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    I have the Lee aniversery kit (the one listed first above), A rcbs press and a Hornaday press. Since the Lee is the first press i got it is still the one I use the most as the others aren't any better or easier to use. I want a progressive press for my pistols but they are way out of my price range. I load or have loaded about a dozen different calibers and this kit has been sufficient to load all of them. Add Lee's book as it is very complete and dies in your favorite caliber (i'd get 7mm it'll give you the greatest savings and be more forgiving than the smaller .243 while you are learning) and you are good to go. Be prepared to buy a new reloading manual every few years or if you see a new edition or a change in your favorite components, be safe.