What not to feed pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Tall Grille, May 11, 2011.

  1. Tall Grille

    Tall Grille Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    I am new to pig raising this year. I planned to start my pig experience raising two pigs but since I am using my grandmothers land I could not say no to her when she invited more family members in on the deal, so we ended up with five pigs and all of my relatives who bought piglets are looking to me as if I am an expert. I have done 90% of the work building the pen and feeding and watering them but I keep getting phone calls asking "Can the pigs have this?" We have 5 different families saving table scraps for the pigs. I would like to hang a sign near the pen with a list of things not to feed them. But I don't know what should be included on the list. Any input would be appreciated.
    Josh
     
  2. Mare Owner

    Mare Owner Sugarstone Farm

    Messages:
    811
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Raw potatoes are a general "no" for pigs (though they can have a little, just not much of their total intake as they can be poisonous raw, cooked are fine). Beyond that, all veggie scraps from the kitchen go to our hogs, plus bread and eggs. I can't think of any other bad foods off the top of my head. Good luck with your new pigs!
     

  3. cooper101

    cooper101 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    968
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Location:
    Michigan
    In my experience, they won't eat asparagus, broccoli, bell peppers, raw onions, banana peels (love bananas), citrus fruit. Save all that for compost or just pitch it. Just makes the pen messy when they don't eat it. There was a post recently about some other things that were not good for them; search for that. I've found they're pretty good at picking out what they don't like and I think part of that is they know it's not good for them. I didn't know about potatoes being bad for them. They would never eat them; now that make sense.

    I can't believe I've cooked for the pigs, but they do seem to like things cooked they won't eat raw. I had a lot of old venison. They loved it if I just boiled it or browned the hamburger, but one wouldn't eat it raw. A different pig ate it raw, but liked it a lot better cooked.
     
  4. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    381
    Joined:
    May 8, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan
    I heard through the grapevine that the Michigan DNR are trying to push out the word that no raw meat should be fed to pigs. I'm not totally sure what their reasoning is.
     
    Trepalo likes this.
  5. thesedays

    thesedays Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,865
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2011
    I thought pig feed was supposed to be boiled anyway, to reduce the risk of parasites.
     
  6. olivehill

    olivehill Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,259
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Location:
    Michigan
    Pigs have likes and dislikes so yours may or may not eat what others' hogs will eat. I have one that dislikes carrots, another that has spit green beans out because he found them so unpalatable. In general however, there's not a whole lot that is a sure fire NO. And the beauty of pigs is they tend, given the opportunity, to be good at knowing what to eat and what not to eat. Now, I say "given the opportunity" because any animal will eat just about anything if locked in a pen long enough without any other choice. So if yours are on a dirt lot and on limited feed do realize they may be less than picky about what you serve up.

    Raw Potatoes, as metioned, can be toxic. Plants in the nightshade family also can be. Pumpkins are generally not recommended for young pigs as they can contribute to scours. Our older pigs love pumpkins however and I've never seen any digestive upset from them -- the seeds act as a natural wormer. Raw meat and "raw" post consumer waste can carry disease, bacteria, etc.

    And then there is the simple fact that you are what you eat and, by extension, you are what you eat eats. Junk in, junk out. Meat quality is affected by feed choices, especially in the last few weeks before butcher but also throughout the growth period.
     
  7. cooper101

    cooper101 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    968
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Location:
    Michigan
    I would also set some guidelines for all families on where they can get scraps from. If it's off your plate, that's one thing. If it's off a stranger's plate in some restaurant, that's different. They get all of our scraps, but I wouldn't get the slop bucket that's in my fifth-grader's lunch room at school. Who knows what bacteria those urchins are carrying. If one family is bringing 'bad' scraps, it'll affect everybody's pig.
     
  8. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,640
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont, Zone 3
    I find that the pigs don't tend to eat what isn't good for them. They pick out citrus, onions, potatoes and leave them aside to rot. If you cook those things they'll eat them and get more nutrition from them. Cooking eggs increases the available protein too.

    Our pigs eat tomatoes with gusto and even the tomato vines in the fall. No problem. It isn't a lot of their diet. The vast majority of what they get is pasture/hay and dairy. We also grow some pumpkins, beets, turnips and such as these are easy things for us to grow.

    The big no-no is the post-consumer wastes. e.g., plate scrapings. The issue is disease being transmitted from people to pigs and then back to people as well as the potential for trichinosis from undercooked meat.

    Cheers

    -Walter
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
    in the mountains of Vermont
    Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
    http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop
    http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
     
  9. Tall Grille

    Tall Grille Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    Thanks for the input. So far they have been eating mostly Grain (Blue Seal Pig and Sow Feed) and table scraps, I have sourced some produce from a company that provides salad stuff for local salad bars, they loved the Romaine Lettuce.
    I am expanding there pen this weekend but we do not have enough useable land to consider it "Pasture". I plan to rotate the pen area. What should I plant in the old area that will be a good food supply when they a returned to that area?
     
  10. ONG2

    ONG2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    386
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Ours love fish scraps, we make sure that there are no bones though. Don't know if the fish bones would hurt a hog or not.......anyone know?

    MY BIL feed his hogs the cleanings from a grouse hunt, they sure thought that was great.
     
  11. wildfrogs1

    wildfrogs1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Would over ripe watermellons and canilopes be OK.

    Does anyone have an idea how many pounds of acorns a year a 10" oak produces ?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  12. NostalgicGranny

    NostalgicGranny Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,592
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Quinlan, Tx
    Wildfrogs1 our pigs love melons and cantalope.
     
  13. wildfrogs1

    wildfrogs1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Thanks for the info. I need to work on my spelling.:buds::ashamed:
     
  14. bruceki

    bruceki Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    339
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    The issue about meat to pigs is based on various regulations that prohibit it. What the USDA and the state ag departments are concerned about is a case of foot--and-mouth disease (FMD) that originated from meat loaded in another country and eventually infected a pig, and spread from there, in 1929, but the government is very worried about it. So they require that any meat scraps fed to pigs be boiled for 30 minutes to sterilize them here in Washington State.

    "The US saw its latest FMD outbreak in Montebello, California in 1929. This outbreak originated in hogs that had eaten infected meat scraps from a tourist steamship that had stocked meat in Argentina. Over 3,600 animals were slaughtered and the disease was contained in less than a month.[14][15] "

    Pigs love meat, and waste meat would be a good source of high-quality protein, but you need to check with your state ag department about the regulations involved to feed it to your pigs.

    Bruce / ebeyfarm.blogspot.com
     
  15. HeritagePigs

    HeritagePigs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    861
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Location:
    Missouri
    Umm...don't you think the prohibition might also have something to do with the foot and mouth outbreak in the UK in 2001 caused by one farmer feeding meat to his pigs? The point is that the virus can easily be transmitted in uncooked meat (as can many other diseases). There aren't a lot of folks that would take the time to cook meat before feeding it to pigs; better to just discourage it altogether.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2011
  16. Tall Grille

    Tall Grille Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Location:
    Southern Maine
    So is meat from table scraps ok? I would only be feeding them meat that was leftover that we aren't going to eat. It would all be cooked to be eaten by humans. What about raw hot dogs? We had pork the other night and couldn't bring ourselves to save the leftover pork for the pigs, seems canibalistic.
     
  17. kenworth

    kenworth Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    899
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Location:
    MI
    I wouldn't let everyone parade on and off the place where the hogs are kept. I would have them meet at a central place with the scraps and collect it from there, and be the one who sorted thru the selection.

    Limiting access (read: keep other family members out!!) and selective choices for scrap feeding will insure the hogs health and safety.

    I'm sure that 90% of the work would garner me interest in the other pigs, too.
     
  18. velacreations

    velacreations Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    75
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    I've fed offal from rabbit butchering, and beef livers, too. I try and cook it, but if it is fresh from a healthy animal (like with the rabbits), I don't worry too much. I don't feed them any meat for at least 40 days prior to butcher.
     
  19. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    17,240
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Raw fish bones are fine. I've heard that cooked bones can cause problems.
     
  20. HeritagePigs

    HeritagePigs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    861
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Location:
    Missouri
    One of the reasons I don't feed meat is my fear that they might start cannibalizing piglets (taste and smell of blood). I don't know if this is true or just a myth but I still worry. And my chickens are happy they aren't looked at as feathery nuggets...