What NEXT?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Jillis, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    You all are probably getting sick of all my questions, but I need answers!
    So with apologies, here is my next quandary!

    Yesterday, I noticed that my black and white spotted Alpine, Funny Valentine, had a patch on her shoulder and her head with no fur! There is no evidence of lice, no irritation at that spot, she looks absolutely healthy in every other regard, is not itching, all her other fur is luxuriant and shiny!
    Then, this morning, I noticed that the little Alpine-Nubian cross (who is so goofy adorable with her long Alpine shaped Nubian sized ears hanging down on each side of her little face like a donkey!) had lost a lot of hair right on the top of her little head! And all around her horn bud area too!

    What's up with THIS? What is going to happen to them NEXT? Could this have to do with a copper deficiency? Somebody help me, please!

    How come none of those smileys is having a nervous breakdown? I need one like that right now! :help:
     
  2. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you are feeding goat mineral free choice, it shouldn't be a deficiency. I aways have goat mineral, either from Purina or West Feeds available at all times. The first thing that comes to mind is ringworm. I treat this with either Fungisan spray for animals or athhete's foot spray for humans. I spray the bald spots and the fur immediately surrounding the area. Wash your hands when you are finished touching the goats. People can get this. I understand that once a person or animal has had ringworm, they become immune. Another cause could be mange from mites, which are so small, you can't see them. This is treated with Ivomec injectable given orally.
     

  3. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I haven't started the minerals but I will be asap...would it be ringworm if there is no accompanying irritation of the skin? It almost looks as if it were shaved right there...
    They are between 9 and 11 weeks of age. Are they too young to be wormed with Ivomectin? I have some paste that I give to the big girls orally that does wonders...
     
  4. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

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    Copper deficiency generally shows up as loss of hair color. Most noticeable in black or dark colored goats. Copper is needed for melanin production that causes hair pigmentation, and if their is a deficiency black goats will have a reddish or brownish cast to their hair. Brown/caramel/grey goats hair will be white near the roots.

    Could be ringworm. Zinc deficiency causes hair loss in goats. Could it be traumatic or mechanical hair loss like rubbing hair off on a fence post or tree trunk? Could be mange, bacterial or viral infections, a big fluctuation in hormones (did she recently kid?) Iodine deficiency can cause hair loss. Selenium poisoning can also contribute to hair loss (depending on your location)

    In any case, it's probably a good idea getting them started on a good mineral supplement in case of an iodine/zinc deficiency. Kelp is an excellent source of iodine and contains zinc. Sunflower seeds are loaded with zinc.
     
  5. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've given Ivermectin to kids that young. You just have to adjust the dose to the kids' weight.
     
  6. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    A little dab'll do ya, huh?
     
  7. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

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    The tell tale sign if it is ringworm it will have a round or semi round shape to it. Are these kids eating feed very well yet? If they are I would add some Black oil sunflower seeds to their diet, if you don't already give it. the extra fiber will help with the poop problems they have had and it will also help give them some added fat that I am sure they have lost with the poop trouble. It also does wonders for haircoat. If it is not round shaped it probably isn't ringworm. Most babies don't show up with defiency problems this early unlesss the dams were in pretty bad shape. Aside from that I would definatley get them some free choice loose minerals out and I would also make sure they have some free choice baking soda out too, that helps with tummy troubles too. :)
     
  8. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I did just start giving the babies some sunflower seeds with their grain...today I got some loose minerals with the right balances and gave them some free choice as well topdressing their grain with that as well as kelp powder...
    I sprayed the spots with the fur missing with BlueKote when I sprayed some of the horn buds that had fallen off...
    I am still giving the Sulmet.
    I didn't give them a bucket of milk last night, and nobody made a fuss. They just dug into their hay and grain.
    This morning, the 2 LaMancha twins didn't latch on to the bucket at all. When I took the babies out they didn't seem too energetic. But when I put them back in they were eating hay okay...

    I am determined to get the hang of this!