What kinds of "at home" jobs do some of you have..

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Kittikity, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. Kittikity

    Kittikity Small scale homesteader

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    I was wondering what kind of at home jobs are out there because I'm a stay at home mom but I'd like to be able to add my two cents monetarily also.. I'm very computer literate so could do most things on the computer except extensive programming.. I type well.. Nothing with sales though.. I don't have the personality for it.. People would tell me no and I'd say ok..

    Do any of you do anything like data entry, transcription, web site maintenance from home as a job? How did you get into that field? Also, any other kind of at home jobs that a mom can do?
     
  2. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    I am not working from home much yet , but am attending college on line finishing my degree in counseling. Also my friend is doing medial office management and billing online from a small town here in montana for a doctor in phoenix arizona! I do wood working and hope to be selling some of that online soon. I know there are several others here who produce some income on live via ebay and I bet there are other things going on also!
     

  3. CraftyDiva

    CraftyDiva Is anybody here?

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    Lately I've been thinking of getting out of craft shows (source of income) and am seriously researching "on-line travel agent". The course would take about 6 mos. and I could continue to craft and sell while taking the course. If nothing else, I could get a job working for American Express (perhaps as a home based travel agent) doing corporate travel plans. I know when I was working a regular job, the compnay used (out sourced) AE as thier travel agent for it's executives.
    Of course there has to be more research to see if this is a profitable endeavor.

    Here's just one study program I found doing a search............
    http://coursecatalog.com/dbpages/courses.asp?CategoryID=30&SchoolID=342
     
  4. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    Well, I have a whole bunch of computer stuff I do at home. In 99, my son talked me into a computer, and wanted me to help him with his site, so I learned allot. Then he quit, and I went on and bought his domain. Since then, I've made and maintained allot of websites for people, as subdomains off my main site, or with their own domain. I built 2 big sites using the online-builders they have available now, they are pretty good. I don't charge allot, but with all of them, it ads up. I don't have any site out there with any pop-up boxes, I can't stand those, and no one else can either. All of them have domain names paid for, and parked on a server, monthly/yearly fees paid, and maintained by me. You really need to pay the $ to have them professionally submitted to the search engines too. Otherwise, they won't show up when people randomly search. For making websites with carts/catalogs/products for others, www.myhomepage.com is by far the best and most reasonable. You just figure out how much for you to maintain it, and they pay all the site/name fees.

    My own domains are www.worldlife.net & www.scrapbookpagesonline.com. Worldlife was the origional site, and there are allot of sub-domains off that one, allot of Border Collie & farm sites. Scrapbookpages is a brand new one we just started. A long time friend of mine is a scrapbooker, and she knew my love for photography & making graphics & sites, so we put our heads together and just made it. I love being able to be totally creative, and with graphic art, it's endless what you can do with good programs.

    I also do some book keeping, faxing, just helping out in general for a couple friends. I have my Border Collie pups, sell goats/sheep sometimes.

    A new good way to make $ for moms is to take pictures, like at the ball games, and then you have your own site where moms can buy prints of their kid. My girlfriend bought really good pics of her boy playing baseball like this. You don't even have to print them, sites will do that for you, and drop-ship them. If you have to go to ALL the ball games/activities anyway. You would just need a business card, good digital camera, and photo editing software and learn the best formats/resolutions, etc, to print out good pics. It's the new thing, and there are allot of pre-made sites just for that. You could do company picnics, awards banquets, scouts, field trips, just about anything really if you don't mind going local places. I personally, don't like to drive anywhere, and don't have kids at home.
     
  5. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    As a "stay at Homesteader" I'd like to address the "I can't sell.." part of the original post.

    Everyone can sell.. we do it all the time. We sell spouses on painting the trim when he really wants to do something else. We sell kids on picking up their clothes. We sell parents on our choice of spouses (no really Dad.. he's not a total bum...).

    What you're talking about is a fear of confrontation, negotiation, or rejection. And if you intend to run a business, which is what most "homebased" is... a Schedule C business... you need to school yourself to get over it or you will either not live up to your potential, or fail spectacularly.

    It is a rare person who can build a business which is so amazing people will seek you out and thrust money into your hands. And, I'm not altogether certain it is such a good role model for Mom to be standing around saying "I can't...."

    You can... you just need to role play and practice at it, and accept that people are not rejecting "you" personally when they reject your business, product, or services. There are books on sales which can teach you techniques, including how to position yourself and your products.. I encourage you to buy and read them.

    One of my personal favorites is Selling the Invisible by Harry Beckwith.
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Also, any other kind of at home jobs that a mom can do?

    Raise bait worms, make soap, dryed flowers, dog grooming or boarding, baby sitting, car detailing, wood furniture stripping, glass engraveing, wedding cakes, antique restoration, nonferrus metal polishing, picture frameing, clothing alterations, the list is endless; the above can be started with less than $100.00.
     
  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    When my kids were small I did home day-care. I made good money until I had too many kids of my own.

    I also want to say something about selling. I have always said I couldn't sell, that I didn't have the personality, wasn't pushy enough, etc. Well...I just got done compiling all my stuff for taxes and I sold $37,000 worth of meat last year...and I just really got going with that in July of last year! I knew I was doing better than I thought, but dang...that's a lot of money!

    Selling isn't about being pushy or charismatic, it's about having a product you can believe in, then offering it to those that want it. It's ok to take "No" for an answer and that doesn't make you a bad salesperson.

    Jena
     
  8. Blackthorne

    Blackthorne Member

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    Jena: What kind of meat were you selling, and if I may ask, how were you selling it?? This sounds interesting and like something I could do.
     
  9. mtnhighgirl

    mtnhighgirl Well-Known Member

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    I have just started my home based business. I sew one of a kind patchwork clothing, make hemp and wire jewelry, crochet hats and accessories, make all natural veggie soaps and various other crafty items. I also offer dread locking services, creating and maintaining them. I sell most of my stuff at festivals and farmers markets, but I am hoping to branch out to on line soon. I am still working 2 days a week outside the home, but hopefully I can quit soon and stay at home full time.
     
  10. Katiecakes

    Katiecakes Member

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    I have a small baking business and have learned that while I don't think that I'm a "saleswoman" per say my products really do sell themselves. I sell at the farmer's market and have a website. The farmer's market gets me good business in the summer and I have many repeat buyers throughout the year. I was able to get a very good client that runs a bed & breakfast as well and is definately my biggest fan and is constantly recommending me to others. This past holiday season saw me and my hubby baking and packing more cookies than I ever thought possible but it's growing...

    I also try to diversify and do things I like to do. This summer I'm planning on selling some of my plant starts and extra produce at the farmer's markets. We have several farmer's markets all through the week in the summer within a 35 mile radius so that helps too - more markets but still not tons of people.
     
  11. healing herbals

    healing herbals Pam in OK

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    I make and sell herbal products, I do nutritional counseling and I am a new doula. Doula work is wonderful, you can work out of home, you only need a baby sitter for a few hours, a few days a month, if that is the way you want to do it. Many doula's say 1 client a month is plenty for them. That would bring in an income of about $500, if you labor doula (which is more time, more energy, all in one stretch) or the postpartum, where you go visit mom and baby for a few hours at a time, as many times as they want or need, to help out.
    wwwdona.org is one organization.
    I also experimented with growing herbs in larger quantity last year. And I had a natural food market that does a weekly coop state an interest in buying from me. So if health permits, I will have more herbs this year.
    Specialty herbs are a good seller, even if you sell from your house.
     
  12. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    Jena, CONGRATULATIONS!!!! I have been following your venture, and am so very pleased for you. You work very hard and I am very glad to see it paying off for you.
     
  13. EasyDay

    EasyDay Gimme a YAAAAY!

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    I'm surprised no one has recommended Ken Scharabok's book to you. He's a moderator here on one of the forums. Give him a shout! He's got a b'zillion ideas to make money on the homestead.
     
  14. Quiver0f10

    Quiver0f10 Well-Known Member

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    I work as a community leader for a major internet service provider. I work in a teen area and my job is to keep the chat rooms clean and safe, boot the perverts off line and so on. It pays pretty good but I would love to get back into selling on Ebay. I like being able to make up my own hours and with the job I have now I have to work a set schedule. Otherwise, its a perfect job for me, I can earn a good income and be home with my family.
     
  15. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    I would also recommend Ken Scharabok's book. It's free, he'll e-mail it to you, and it is excellent. There are hundreds of ideas for things to do at or from home in rural areas.

    We just moved in here this last year, so I'm still working on plans, but my plans include: selling flowers and honey at the Farmer's Market; selling goat milk, goat milk soap, and goats; making some items for sale at the Farmer's Market and at SCA events; possibly writing some magazine articles and maybe someday even books; anything else I can think of that I can do on a small piece of land! It won't add up to a lot, but we have no mortgage here, so we don't really need a lot.
     
  16. soulsurvivor

    soulsurvivor Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Friends of ours that live "in town" on the main thoroughfare and have a good vehicle pull-off, sell garden produce in season. They make enough from this to supplement income all year. They raise and sell everything from plant starters in the spring all the way to dried corn twists and pumpkins in the fall. And they always make good money. Course it's hard work, but one or the other of them sits on the front porch until customer assist is needed. They've done this for years and as they've gotten older have been hiring help for some of the back breaking work in the garden. Oh, and they had to go before the zoning board and get a special permit a few years back. They've made the most of their good location, and still have no plans to retire. They love what they do and it helps supplement retirement income.
     
  17. annethcz

    annethcz Well-Known Member

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    I'm a WAHM (work at home mom), and I have been for almost 5 years now. When my son was born, I started a small online business. I've kept at it, and it's grown over the years. I don't make enough money to support my family, but it does supplement DH's wages, and best of all, it gives me a creative outlet. I love being business owner because it makes me feel capable.

    I have found that the more I put into it, the better my business does.

    If you're interested in starting your own business, rather than working for someone else, do your homework first. Take a look at what products are currently on the market. Check out your compeition. And find a product/service that you believe in and will feel good about offering. That really does make a difference.
     
  18. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I sell chicken, beef and pork. I raise all of it and sell at farmers markets, in a parking lot and through word of mouth. A USDA processor is vital to my business, or I suppose I could get by with a state inspected one.

    That gross sales figure sounds nice, but keep in mind that there's only about a 30% profit, so I did not net that much! This is also not something I'd want to try if I had small kids to care for. Too much time out and about and missing a market or something really hurts business. Hard to not miss things if you have small kids who get sick, etc.

    Jena
     
  19. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    I have a store on eBay and that's how we have been living since April. But it does take a lot of time.

    I have a good friend who works at home on her computer for a big hospital in our area. They set up a computer system in her home (and other people as well) and she transcribes x-rays and reports. She can work at night if she wants. And if something goes wrong with her computer they send someone out to fix it for her. She had a background in nursing, worked as a cna and also as a secretary. But you could probably find a online course for this field. She has all the benefits of a job and holiday & sick pay and it's a real job. Once she signs onto her computer she's getting paid. And she's been there awhile and makes very good money.
     
  20. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I do a small store and developed mail order to customers that I have interest with a sideline in the craft of custom rod building. which I try to turn full time....and it's a challenge, to be sure and costly startup. Payback will take years, though my plan was to be in it for the longer haul. Marriage breakup has put a crimp into current solutions, but that's life. :rolleyes:

    During the fishing season locally, there is some business selling specialty tackle. There are major fishing lakes nearby. Being out of the way, I've had to develop (and keep trying to develop) this into a workable business. At it since the store opened 4 years ago and still struggling.
    I plan to hope and do more with farmstead activities to include vermiculture, market garden, poultry for self sufficiency. Part of why I tuned into this board a few months ago has gained me invaluable informtaion towards this direction.

    Rich
    www.rodreel.com