what kind of wood burner...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by newatthis, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. newatthis

    newatthis Well-Known Member

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    We are looking into purchasing a wood burner to heat our home instead of propane. what would you guys suggest?

    I just love to glean off of your knowledge :dance: :cool:
     
  2. brownthumb

    brownthumb Well-Known Member

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    Jotul....had one for years and love it!
     

  3. NorthernMich

    NorthernMich Well-Known Member

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    This link will give you ideas and prices www.cozyheat.com

    They are a great family too...you may call them with questions.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are almost up north here, so you need some real heat. :)

    So, what do you have now? Forced air one would assume, but hot water or? How big of a house, how well insulated (what's the BTU rating of your current furnace)? I take it you are looking for a whole house unit, not just a room unit?

    I really prefer a wood furnace in the basement, plumbed in with your exsisting furnace. This requires a dedicated chimney, and room for the furnace & some wood storage. My house was built for that, so works well.

    Would you just like to heat up a room or two, on occation, & just have a wood stove sitting in a room on the main floor? That really can be difficult to regulate in our type of climate, as it heats up the one room, & your furnace fails to heat the rest of the house depending on where your thermostat is. You need to plan this out well to get good results. I know lots of folks from the south do this, but they don't need the massive BTU's we do. You need to plan to make this work in a real cold climate is all. These are the easiest to run without power, so in that way it's a wonderful backup heat for power outages, etc.

    I have radiators, & so a wood boiler with the oil boiler. Real nice even heat, like they setup.

    Some folks like outdoor boilers, less issues with insurance, chimney, & dirt in the house. Some of these tend to smoke a lot, and of course they are less efficent, and you need to dress up 2x a day to fire it. Maybe it suits you, maybe not. Need to pump the hot water into the house. They are almost all open systems, so oxygen is in the pipes, so there is rusting issues over time.

    There are a few outdoor furnaces, that move hot air. Don't see too much on those tho, don't know much about them.

    So did I talk generally enough to not help any at all, & just flail around on you? :)

    --->Paul
     
  5. Simpler1773

    Simpler1773 Well-Known Member

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    We just bought a Lopi Endevor and love it.

    Ricki
     
  6. KindredSpirit

    KindredSpirit Well-Known Member

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    Ditto that. We had one also and it was a great little stove.
     
  7. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Ok, I will beat Cabin Fever to the punch here. I have a jotul sitting here that has a nice little crack in the cast iron. Plus it has a nice EXPENSIVE catalytic convertor that needs replace. So, although I know people love their Jotul's, I say, HECK NO! LOL!

    Go with a plate steel, line with fire brick, air tight unit, that has a secondary burn chamber instead of the catalytic converter. Just do a search on wood burner on this site and you will get a nice list of everyone's favorite.
     
  8. TheBlueOne

    TheBlueOne Well-Known Member

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    Second that. You heat from the ground up, using and re-using the heat as it rises. The floor is toasty warm in addition to the usual benefits of running the furnace. We've got a U.S. Stove model from TSC.
     
  9. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    Youkon makes a very efficient combination wood/oil, or wood/gas forced air furnace. My dad and I have used them for years untill I buildt outdoor wood furnaces for us. http://www.yukon-eagle.com/eagle1.htm
     
  10. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    I will second that. We had cast iron in our last house, and we have a steel stove now. They steel is SOOOO much better. I'll never go back to cast iron again.

     
  11. newatthis

    newatthis Well-Known Member

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    Thank you once again everybody.

    Rambler- I do agree that here in WI/MN we need one in basement so our whole house will be warmer in winter.
    thank you for that thought. We really don't know anything about these furnaces so thank you for your post.

    Thank you NorthernMich and michigan farmer for the links. Hubby will love the research.
     
  12. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My 30+ year old (Jotul 118 I think ) doesn't have a catalytic converter and the cast iron is hlding up fine, thank you. The welded steel stoves that we have owned have all gone to the junk pile because they burned out after 15 to 20 years. But, we just replaced our central forced air wood burning furnace of 20+ years (it was a Jensen or one of the other similar brands of locally built furnaces that became so widely available back in the 1970s and 80s) with a brand new Charmaster Chalet, and so far are impressed with the workmanship and the apparent burning efficiency. And it comes with a water preheating coil in the firebox that should save us substantial $$$ on LP water heating costs.
    http://www.charmaster.com/
     
  13. Mrs. Vet

    Mrs. Vet Well-Known Member

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    Goatlady just gave us an air tight stove and we are in the process of installing it. It has been a major job to do so and sure will be glad when it is done. But I know it will be well worth it, that's for sure! We had a fireplace that just didn't work well at all. So out it went! I think everything will be done witnin a week; so soon I will be enjoying my wood burning stove. One thing. We fired ours up outside prior to bringing in the house. That way we burned off the new smell.
     
  14. newatthis

    newatthis Well-Known Member

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    [ One thing. We fired ours up outside prior to bringing in the house. That way we burned off the new smell.[/QUOTE]
    Great idea for us as my dd and I have allergies and that is another thing about us trying a wood burner. :cool: :nerd:

    See I get such great tips from all of you :dance:
     
  15. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    There are two decisions you are going to have to make:

    Decision 1: Do you want a stove that is made of cast iron or plate steel? Plate steel stoves are welded together whereas cast iron stoves are bolted and cemented together. Cast iron can also crack if you make a quick, roaring hot fire in a cold stove. Many people think that cast iron stoves are prettier.

    Decision 2: All new stoves are required to meet EPA air pollution standards. There are two ways that stoves accomplish this. They use either secondary combustion or ceramic catalysts. Secondary combustion generally uses a set of perforated pipes, placed near the top of the firebox. Air is circulated through these pipes which is used to burn off volatile gases. The system is pretty fool-proof and indestructible. Ceramic catalyst accomplish the same thing (burning off volatile gases) similar to a car’s catalytic converter. The problem with ceramic catalyst is that they can plug and break. They periodically need cleaning and are expensive to replace if they break.

    Based on the above, my recommendation is a plate-steel woodstove with secondary combustion. We have a Lopi brand stove (made in the USA), but there are several similar brands available.
     
  16. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    the youkons I was talking about that my dad and I have used for years are youkon eagle 1, model LWO-112. http://www.yukon-eagle.com/eagle1.htm They are plate steel with a secondary combustion chamber. If you happen to choose this furnace get ahold of me. There are tricks to getting more efficiency out of it.
     
  17. DeerHaven

    DeerHaven Active Member

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    I would strongly recomend a Pacific Energy wood stove. We just purchased the Summit model, rated for up to 3000 square feet, it keeps our 3200 square feet nice and warm. They make smaller models however.
    I have heard bad things about Jotul, along with catalytic converters. The Summit has a secondary burn chamber, is made from plate steel, is air tight, and has a nice air wash glass door for some visual enjoyment as well.
    My brother in law has had his for 5 years and recommended it to us, its a great stove!
     
  18. laith

    laith Active Member

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    woodstock soapstone only way to go,,,,,,,, even heat an excellent stove
     
  19. farmerscotty

    farmerscotty Well-Known Member

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    Ok first before any of you grumble, I do sell these heaters and have for 18 years. So don't flame me since I post here......I would never have anything inside again after getting it outside. No mess no wood no ashes in house. Less work since you don't have to carry wood as far. That I would say regardless of whether I sold these or not........

    so here is the link ............www.outsidewoodheater.com if you think I am advertising just to advertise........don't go to the site. :nono:

    It works and is cheap!

    Farmerscotty in Missouri.