What kind of snake is this?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Rita, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My grandson found a snake while out cutting firewood that looks a bit like a copperhead but it flattens it's head and neck area like a cobra and hisses. Locals told him it was a TN adder and twice as poisonous as a copperhead but there are only supposed to be 4 poisonous snakes in Tennessee. It was found in high, dry woods. Any ideas?
     
  2. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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  3. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    That's what I was thinking, spreading adder or hog-nosed snake. They aren't poisonous, but they might scare you to death.
     
  4. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    we accidently watered a hognose snake in our back yard and it about scared us to death. They flatten themselves out like a cobra hood, hissing and wiggling their tail like a rattler, and if you don't back back off they convulse and flip themselves over. If you still don't back off they regurgitate and excrete at you...but they are nOT venomous! Just very surprising!
    We love out backyard snakes...no problems with rats in this yard- only in the silly neighbors who scream and kill every snake they see...
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yup, hog-nosed snake was the first thing that popped into my mind too. Haven't seen one since I was a kid in north Alabama.
     
  6. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

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    Here is a website that gives you more information on the snake:
    http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/natsci/herpetology/fl-guide/heterodonplatirhinos.htm

    Even though they are called several different names, we also called them spreading adders. As kids we would play with them because when they see that all their bluffing is not working, they would roll over and play dead. Yeah, I know. We didn't have much sense. :rolleyes:

    mamabear
     
  7. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We did the same thing mamabear. There is no record of a hog-nosed snake ever biting anyone. They do not have sufficient fangs to bite a human. Here's a picture:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Ravenlost for posting the picture. I could find the websites, but I ain't bright enough to get a picture on here. :rolleyes:
    mamabear
     
  9. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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  10. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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  11. A couple of weeks ago while mowing the lawn I happen to find one about 8" long. I shut the engine off and called my kids to the scene. I put on a brown jersy glove and picked it up to show the kids how it spreads its neck out like a Cobra. The snake did strike at me but it would never open its mouth to bite. After handling it for a few moments it did poop in my hand and stunk bad. We then let it go in some tall weeds outside the yard. So hopefully it is still around somewhere.

    Ravenlost, that picture is one of the biggest adders i have seen.
     
  12. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    They are in N. Mississippi. Two years ago one scared me to death by its behaviour which resulted in me obliging it with death. It was about 2.5 feet long and quite thick. Looked and acted more like a viper than any rattlesnake. I figured out what it was afterwards.
     
  13. mamabear

    mamabear Well-Known Member

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    Well, r.h., I did leave out that part, that if you play with them long enough and the playing dead part doesn't work, then they poop and sometimes vomit to get you to leave them alone. Works for me... :p

    mamabear
     
  14. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...I probably haven't seen one here in north MS because I'm not as inclined to go looking for snakes as I was when I was a kid!
     
  15. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    If memory serves, hognoses in general are "rear fanged" which accounts for their greater difficulty in biting humans. Care should be taken around Western Hognoses though, again if I remember correctly, there has been some discrepancy as to whether the Western, specifically, is venomous or "just" toxic. Western bites have occurred in humans but the last I heard no one had really researched enough to determine if it was a reaction as a result of envenomation or if something else, such as saliva, was at work.
     
  16. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    It has been probably 5 years since I have seen one. I always treated finding a snake as something special. Even a simple garter snake is an event for me. I got really excited when I found my first rattlesnake and copperhead in ages the year before last. One snake I haven't seen a very long time is blue racer. The last one I saw was probably 10 years ago and it had been run over.

    Yeah I'm a nature nerd. Saw a red tail hawk catch and eat a rabbit in my back yard today.
     
  17. mommymushbrain

    mommymushbrain Well-Known Member

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    *shudders* I should not have opened this thread. Vomiting snakes? I'll go pass out now.... :haha:
     
  18. barnyardfun

    barnyardfun Happy Homemaker Supporter

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    I remember catching snakes as a kid, a fun past time I guess. The last time I caught a snake was the day I caught a baby copperhead and my dad had to cut it's head off with scissors while I was still holding it in my fingers!! He was afraid it would bit me if I tried to let it go. That was the last time I felt inclined to pick up a snake! :haha:
     
  19. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for all the replies. We thought it might be a pygmy rattler and one of the sites refered to says they are confused with them. I'm sure glad that it was not highly poisonous as the grandson had it loose in the truck and was trying to catch it with bare hands after telling me it was so poisonous. No wonder grandmother's have grey hair!
     
  20. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    Hognosed Snakes are NOT venomous. They are NOT "rear fanged"..they have no fangs at all. That does not mean they do not have teeth. They do and can bite but it is extemely rare as they depend on their little devious displays to keep themselves out of trouble.

    There are only four groups of venomous snakes naturally found in the USA. The coral snake, a relative of the cobra, is found in southern states as far west as Texas and some people have reported them in southern Arizona. They are easily confused by some with the Mountain King Snake and the Shovelnosed snake. The copperhead is found in most of the eastern and mid-western states. The Cottonmouth Moccasin occupies waterways and wetlands throughout the south as far west as Texas. Rattlesnakes, which are a type of pit viper, are the most widely dispersed with different varieties/subspecies etc that can be found throughout most of the USA.

    That's it. You can get infections from a snake bite if you are bitten by a snake that's not venomous. You can get an infection from any wound that you don't take care of properly, but the most dangerous non-venomous bite is that of a human. That can really make you sick.

    Snakes are facinating and helpful creatures. I miss them here in the Pacific Northwest where they are rare.

    LQ