What kind of homestead fencing do you have?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by thequeensblessing, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    We're going to fence in our entire property this spring. Currently we have only our pastures fenced in. We're considering using tensile wire fencing on the sides and back of our property (chargeable) with 4 board wood fencing across the front for its curb appeal. We like this because it's the least expensive, safest, and strongest fencing we have found for the kinds of critters we have-- goats, horses, beef cattle, pyrenees, grandkids :p . Any thoughts on why this may not be the best choice? I want to explore all sides of the equation before we spend all that money!

    What do you all use on your homestead as fencing to keep your animals in or tresspassers out? Field fencing? picket fencing? razor wire? barbed wire? Tell me about your choices and why please?
     
  2. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you have a great plan! We have 4 foot, wire livestock fence with wood poles. It's not pretty, but it's also not visable from the road. It's held up good for the past 12 years, only needing repairs the couple of times we've snagged it with the disks (whoops!). If you have big critters that will lean on it, it would probably require a line of electric on top, and I suspect goats would simply consider it an interesting bit of recreation and climb right over! I like the fencing sold as horse fence for poultry and the more agile animals (I have a sheltie that could scale the regular fence in her early years). It is over 4 feet, and has small, rectangular holes. Best of luck on your big job!
     

  3. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    Anybody made fences from old pallets? They actually don't look bad if they are painted. They look really a bit like picket fencing if you make sure to level them out. We get them free around here. We've made the kids play area with them (a play ground), and our compost and leaf litter containers. I don't have large animals, though, so I don't know if that would work for that purpose.

    If inexpensive is the goal, pallets are the way to go.
     
  4. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like you have a great plan. I have mostly electric fencing(very tight 14 gauge wire) with a *very* hot charger. It contains all the goats, cows, LGD's, and the horse. Only thing it won't keep in are the poultry. ;) I chose it because it was cheaper than woven, and I can install it myself, by myself.
     
  5. astrocow

    astrocow Well-Known Member

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    We have a lot of trees and quite a variety of them too. We used them to make a post and pole fence. 3 poles keeps in the cows. We have small cows and they are quite easy on the fence. The bush is so thick you couldn't tell we cut trees for the fence. Some trees we used were blowdowns so they didn't go to waste.
     
  6. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Our place has OLD OLD barbed wire around two sides. This MUST be replaced this year. On one end and part of one side, there is four strand hot wire. On the other partial side we have a pen for isolating animals and sorting when we are selling calves. It is made of shoulder high net wire with a cable on the top edge.
     
  7. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    A very good plan. I used 4 cresote boards fencing around the barn and the house and Hi Tensile for the rest. If you are going to put horses in it please put springs in the Hi Tensile line. It will save a lot of Heart Burn later.
     
  8. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Our pastures are all page wire (guess that would be cattle fencing, sz 12 gauge, that would be the taller kind). It was partially barbed wire, but I pulled it down. The previous owners were using the BW for horse fencing and that, to me, is not acceptable horse fence. I will use the page wire for now, if the horses test it, I will be adding a solar-powered electric fence as an additional deterrent. We can get a kit for a 5-mile radius of fence for $600---wayyyy cheaper than putting up the page wire!

    I also have a paddock that is a combo of wood rails and page wire. I can't wait to get to that in the spring and get the cheesy-looking page wire outta there! I would love all wood posts in an enlarged paddock---or maybe a separated 2-sectioned paddock.

    We also have tons of pallets here left by the previous owners, would love some ideas on what to do with them. Not sure if they would make good fencing for larger animals, they don't tend to be very thick, plus since they are shorter pieces, I would think they would not bear much weight. They would also need to be treated with something to repel chewers. I was thinking that they might make good fencing for smaller animals though.
     
  9. cindyc

    cindyc Well-Known Member

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    OK basically, you need two stakes of some kind for each pallet and some short nails. It looks prettier if you level out the ground a bit, so that the tops slats in the pallets are all prettymuch uniform, but if you are far enough out into the country, you might not care. I was thinking that the slats are up and down, but they are not, they are sideways, more like a wood farm fence than a picket. Drive the first stake into the pallet between the sets of slats next to the side board that holds them separated. Then drive the second stake into the other side of the pallet next to the other side board. set the front set of slats on the next pallet slightly behind the first pallet touching the front slats on the first pallet and nail a few of the slats together. Then stake the second pallet as you did the first. Do the third just as you did the second, except put the slats in front of pallet number two, not behind. Alternate front, back, front, back like that to keep the pallets pretty much in a strait line. You have to paint them or treat them so they don't rot because they are wood, but believe it or not, it acually looks pretty good.
    OT we also nailed them together like three sides of a square to be a compost pile, turned them flat to the ground, and added legs to build the base of a play fort for the kids, and used one to be the door of our garden fence. I'm sure we'll think of more uses. Maybe you should start your own thread about uses for pallets. I'd love to hear what folks have to say, too. As I said, we get them free.
     
  10. astrocow

    astrocow Well-Known Member

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    I believe some pallets are chemically treated to deter rot and also to kill any pests living in them. I've seen pallets being sprayed when removed from cargo containers. Might not be good for chewers.
     
  11. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    The long end of the property has a very old fence of wven wire that has been stretched and pushed until it could be stepped over. On top of this is a barbed wire broken in places;, embedded in trees growing along it, and tangled on the ground. This fence is supposedly to be maintained by guy on the other side of the fence. We removed the barbed wire, cut outas much brush as we could, and strung new woven wire fencing along that part that was contain the horse. Never done this before. After putting up a roll, we stopped and looked at each other, and bought cattle panels. The woven wire fencing we put up ten years ago is showing its age, but the cattle panels are as good as new--except where a tree fell on it. Would highly recommed considering the cattle panels. Thechickens, guineas, and ducks go through it and over it; foxes can go over it; but dogs are kept out, and they are the main predator here.

    Pallets: Inside the barn, pallets are used as walls for sheep pens. I use a T post between each pallet, and tie the pallet in place with baling twine. For a sturdier fix, the end pallet was nailed to the wall and a 1 x 4 nailed horizontally across the expanse (I think it is 3 pallets) at sheep head high so they can't bash their way to freedom when they see the vet. The gate is the headboard of a metal baby crib. Another gate else where is a pallet with hinges made from old rubber boots. That has held up for 3 years of daily use now. The compost pile consists of 4 pallets. A t post at each corner. Pallets tied to posts with several thicknesses of baling twine. The next sections can be made with three palletsand two posts. I fill them part way, then tie on the "door" and continue to fill. The twine holds up until the compost is ready. to go on the garden. Pallets are used under the hay. two deep, to keep the hay off the ground during storage;, as well as the stored firewood.
     
  12. Cheryl in SD

    Cheryl in SD Living in the Hills Supporter

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    Free.

    I found an ad in the paper for 1000 feet (end up being more like 1500) of 6' high woven wire with posts, you remove, free. We now have enough to fence the whole place (1.67 acres).

    Is it what I would have bought, nope. But am I thankful I have it, YOU BET. I will be putting it up as soon as the ground thaws.

    Cheryl