What kind of Fencing?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by WatchMeFly, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. WatchMeFly

    WatchMeFly Member

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    what kind of fencing do you all suggest for keeping a bull? what has worked and what has not? i have a young jersey bull that i want to use for breeding. thanks :)
     
  2. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would use a stout, five-foot woven wire fence with an electric wire running around the inside. Jersey bulls can be notoriously dangerous when they reach a certain age. You don't want to take any chances with him getting out and never turn your back on him.
     

  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Since your are keeping this animal as a bull have you already dehorned him? Additionally have you given any thought to putting a ring in his nose and breaking him to lead?
     
  4. WatchMeFly

    WatchMeFly Member

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    he is hornless and is broke to lead. i taught him to lead pretty much since he was born, and once he got the idea, hasnt given me trouble since. he is only 2 months old, so hopefully his cheerful attitude will continue (fingers crossed) :)
     
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Jerseys bulls and cheerfullness wont last. Our neighbor has a Jersey bull, not that big, has horns (only thing that bothers me with him, his size doesn't bother me). He growls at times, not at a person, at animals opposite side of the road. What holds him in? One strand of electric fence, never saw him out, or have I seen any of his past Jersey bulls out. I see his heifers out, but never saw his bulls. Now that is him, what I would do with a bull such as a Jersey bull. Is have a sturdy fence, electric fence that carries a nice strong shock would be nice. I would go with one strand of CABLE. Cable carries a strong current, due to its thickness. Remember, thicker wire carries power further. Cable isn't expensive. QC Supply had theirs @ .07 a foot, for 2000lb test cable. I used cable, and that stuff is nasty (got shocked by it), it is quite a ways away from the fencer. For a subfence (well, id but the cable at a height above his brisket). Page wire fence will work, just make sure its tight and use good posts, or pound T-posts in nice and deep. As long as you keep something there, such as that cable electric fence at the level I mentioned, he will respect the fence. They wont get out unless a heifer is opposite side of the fence going, WASSAAAAP! :). Keep the cows and heifers in heat away from him, and you should be fine.


    Jeff
     
  6. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    Your name boggles my mind. I have visions of you standing on a cliff edge .... :D

    Anyway, back to your question. Much of our conventional fencing over here is what is called wire, post and batten i.e. posts every 3m or so, strung with tightened 7 or 8 wires and battens stappled on to the wires. Probably no more expensive to erect but will last 40 years plus, and will keep sheep and cattle confined to where they are supposed to be. For bulls of any breed, an electric wire on an out-rigger is strung along the top of the fence.

    Jersey bulls! While the cow of the breed is recognised as one of the easiest and most mild mannered to own, the bull is a different kettle of fish. Your two month old bull will be a kitty cat right now simply because he is still a baby but in another 15 months or so he's going to be feeling his oats and letting you know. I've reared Jersey bulls and from day one they have been in a halter and the only dominant factor has been me! Without exception, they hated my husband and one turned him into a hurdler. Bug-a-lugs lowered his head and charged. Kevin took off and literally cleared the fence with room to spare. Starting as of now, treat your bull with care and respect and let him know who is boss. I use my voice with a stout stick for reinforcement if needed but start off as you mean to go on.

    None of my bulls are dehorned and although I have what I consider to be a very good rapport with them, I still watch them like a hawk and give them the respect that they deserve.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie