What kind of fencing is the best?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by holleegee, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

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    We just bought 9 acres and built a house. We will be fencing off about 8 acres. What type of fencing works well with goats? Part of our land is next to a highway and I want to make sure they don't get out of the fence. Thanks for your help!
     
  2. tinker-girl

    tinker-girl Member

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    Woven wire works good for us. Then we put 2 or 3 strands of barb wire on top to make it tall as we like. Once in a while you will get a goat that loves to jump fence. Or you could just run a strand of electric wire inside the woven to back them off from trying.
     

  3. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    I look at fencing the same way I look at constructing stuff: Build the best you can afford and if you have to skimp don't do it at the important parts of the project.

    If you can afford it I would put field fencing all around. If not, put the field fencing on the highway side with a strand of electric over the top then 3 to 5 strand electric every where else. The nice thing about electric is as long as the goats are happy and are trained to the fence you can turn the power off and they won't go near it. Ours has been off for 10 months now and won't go back on until the babies hit the dirt, then it will go off a few months after that.

    The thing to remember about goats is not only do they sometimes want to get out but bone head neighbors dogs love to get in. Keep the rifle sighted in and don't hesitate to shoot.

    Now if someone had more $$ than they can count; 10' high heavy guage chain link with cemented posts and concertina wire on top would be ideal to keep your goaties in and anything but a mountail lion or a government raid team out.
     
  4. NewlandNubians

    NewlandNubians Well-Known Member

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    buy the red top field fence if you can find it. It lasts pretty good but not like the old timey field fence on the farm here. New stuff will last more or less 20 yrs. if you do it right.

    posts: tee posts, treated posts from lumber store, or if you're lucky enough to live somewhere you can get locust posts, they are free (-;

    Put one strand of wire on top of fence above field fence. Does not need to be electrified as it will not shock them if they jump over and they hit it jumping over. This wire just keeps branches from crushing field fence should a big branch fall on it if your fence is near trees. Also adds a little more height to the fence. Use either barbed wire or if you're not a fan of barbed wire you can use smooth high tensile (not regular think electric fence wire but the heavy duty stuff).

    Put one electrified wire on inside (goat side) of field fence about 2 1/2 feet up (for standard size goats - maybe 2' for small breeds). This is essential to the long life of your field fence. If you don't do this, goats will attempt to eat through the fence and they will tear up the field fence much quicker than normal. This also keeps them from always sticking their head through and may stove off a dog attack from neighbor dogs.

    Just electric unless you do the nine strand high tensile will more than likely not work all the time. It depends mainly upon the soil in your area. My goats learn that in the winter with frozen ground and long hair they just walk through the division fences which are three strands of hot wire. You have to make sure it's grounded good (that's our main problem right now) and make sure it's hot all the time which means weed eating in the summer. Plus I like a physical barrier when it comes to dogs.

    Definitely do your perimeter fence with field fence and save the electric for division fences.
     
  5. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    "Put one electrified wire on inside (goat side) of field fence about 2 1/2 feet up (for standard size goats - maybe 2' for small breeds). This is essential to the long life of your field fence. If you don't do this, goats will attempt to eat through the fence and they will tear up the field fence much quicker than normal. This also keeps them from always sticking their head through and may stove off a dog attack from neighbor dogs."



    If it is at all possible you should also run a line of electric around 12" - 18" or so off the ground on the 4 " standoffs on the non goat side, that really helps with the predators
     
  6. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    i agree, woven field fence, with a strand of electric about chest high (to the goats) for perimeter fences.

    consider fencing smaller areas so you can rotate pastures, which will decrease any worm/parasite problems. run chickens to help take care of worms :)
     
  7. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    You can solve grounding problems and make a more effective fence by using seven strands of high tensile wire. From the bottom:
    First strand at 8" - hot
    Second strand at 18" - ground
    Third strand 28" - hot
    Fourth strand 34" - hot
    Fifth strand 40" - ground
    Sixth strand 44" - hot
    Seventh strand - 48" hot

    The advantage is that you don't have to rely on the conductivity of the soil to provide grounding. When an animal contacts a hot wire only, the earth ground will provide a shock. If it's a poor ground and the animal is not deterred, the second and fifth strand will provide a full shock when both are contacted. The configuration can be adjusted to suit the animals to be deterred, but you get the idea... You just want to be certain that the wires at nose height to the [goat] are set closest together so the shock occurs before they are able to get their head past the wire. If they are shocked in front of their eyes, they will back up - if behind their eyes they will be motivated to move forward and just crash through the fence. Goats are notorious for "taking a shock" if they know it's only a mild 'quickie', so be sure to use a charger that's a minimum of 2 joules (3-4 is better). One more thing that is an advantage of this type of system: The earthen ground can be enhanced by driving grounding rods 8-10 feet deep at intervals around the fence and wiring them to the second (grounded) strand. I don't have issues with grounding where I live (water table is normally at about 8-12" - I've seen electric arcs jump a full inch to a pig's snout!) but I've talked with folks in New Mexico and West Texas that have done this with success.

    I agree with rotating livestock through smaller paddocks - it's just good practice. Be cautious to keep the paddocks sufficiently large so as not to make the animals feel crowded - that's probably the number two motivation for livestock to try to breech a fence.
     
  8. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    our yard has always been fenced with "red brand" (the kind with a red wire along the top) and has lasted as long as our barn (built in 1909) it's more expensiive, but pays for itself in a few years. make sure you stablize corners and gates, and use wooden posts at stress points. use a single strand of electric wire to keep them from rubbing and tearing down the fence. do not get barbed wire because goats will scratch themselves on it, get tangled in it or try to jum over it and land on it. it's good enough for cattle, but too dangerous for goats. keep the posts at most 8 feet apart. make sure to have latches on gates that require more than one movement to open, such as lift and pull. make sure the spacing is no more than 4x4, so thier horns can't get stuck in it and kids cant wander out through the fence. Red brand sells a kind of fence called Goat Fence, which works wonderfully for us. also, you may want to make some sort of marker for the wild deer to see. many a fence has fallen from a scared deer running into it.
     
  9. Chinclub

    Chinclub Well-Known Member

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    "You can solve grounding problems and make a more effective fence by using seven strands of high tensile wire. From the bottom:
    First strand at 8" - hot
    Second strand at 18" - ground
    Third strand 28" - hot
    Fourth strand 34" - hot
    Fifth strand 40" - ground
    Sixth strand 44" - hot
    Seventh strand - 48" hot"

    This is by far the best fence in my experience. We have had our goats push at ground level until they break a chain link fence to escape, We have had them jump over fences, run right through any other electric fence, then even managed to get out of welded wire. The only thing that finally worked was an electric fence done like suggested above. And it is most embarrassing when someone knocks on your door to say your goats are stopping traffic!! Goats can be the most trying animals in the world..but you gotta love'em!!
     
  10. MimmyJ

    MimmyJ Member

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    I do like the way you think!! :D
     
  11. poppy

    poppy Guest

    This is your best bet for fencing in goats. I saw it posted somewhere, can't remember where. Build a solid wood fence 10 ft tall. No gates at all. Then move inside 3 ft and build another solid wood fence 10 ft tall. No gates. Then fill the space between the fences with concrete clear to the top. This should keep them in MOST of the time. :)