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Budding homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What exactly is timothy hay? My feed store doesn't carry it, although they do carry alfalfa hay. I can get timothy hay at TSC in little bitty bags but not bales.
 

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Budding homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Timothy is considered a cool/temperate grass, so it is possible that it is not commonly grown in your area, Trinityoaks. Just a guess.
Thanks for the link, Maggie! After reading that, I'm thinking that it's not the temperatures that keep it from growing here (at least in the spring and fall) but the dryness. Timothy grass seems to need a lot more humidity than we have here.

On the other hand, they DO grow ****** corn here, but I can't get that at the feed store, either. :shrug:
 

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Any Orchard grass hay in your area?

I was lucky enough to get good bales from my high school science teacher, his wife boards horses. got some alfalfa (phasing out pellets), and timothy/grass mix. $3 a bale.

It breaks my heart that the "nice" plastic pet food bags are $5ish, and a whole bale is less if you can find it.
 

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Budding homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Any Orchard grass hay in your area?
I'm not sure what that is, either. And I didn't see anything by that name at the feed store. Certainly no orchards around here! There is also coastal hay and prairie hay. Any relation to either timothy hay or orchard grass hay?

I'm trying to learn these things as fast as I can, but I'm a country girl at heart who has been stuck in the city all her life.
 

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Budding homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
prairie hay might be....coastal hay I have no clue...you'd probably have to google it. Prairie grass though is a specific type of grass.
Hmmmm. . . From the pages I brought up by googling "prairie hay", it seems to be a hay of whatever wild grasses grow in a particular area, which could vary widely from one area to another.

"Coastal hay" seems to be a bermuda grass hay. It appears to be a Southeast U.S. thing. Bermuda is also a popular lawn grass here.

I also ran across "brome hay", which seems to be a particular type of grass hay. This is getting more bewildering by the moment.

What other grass hays are there? What other legume hays are there besides alfalfa? Do I understand correctly that legume hays are higher in protein than grass hays? What category does clover hay fall under?
 

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Clover hay is a legume hay, comparable to alfalfa in protein and nutrients.

Just for fun, I googled hay Texas Panhandle. Looks pretty rough with the wildfires and drought. Hay must be more expensive and harder to find than usual for you this winter.

I found hay to be very confusing at first. I still cannot identify all the grasses around here. I had a country but not farm childhood... and then years in the city. A good basic agriculture book - preferably an older one - is a good place to start. They keep it simple, which helps a lot.
 

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Budding homesteader
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just for fun, I googled hay Texas Panhandle. Looks pretty rough with the wildfires and drought. Hay must be more expensive and harder to find than usual for you this winter.
Our area is finally recovering from the wildfires (the really bad, extensive ones were in the spring of 2006), but it's been really dry here. I've only just begun to check on alfalfa prices and availablity, but I have noticed that people in other parts of the U.S. are paying about $3-4 for a bale that costs me $7.50. The larger round bales are less expensive per pound, but I have nowhere to store one nor equipment to move it.

I found hay to be very confusing at first. I still cannot identify all the grasses around here.
I'm certainly getting an education! I just found a wiki article that helps explain the basics. It would have been easier and less confusing for me if I'd started here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hay
 

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That looks like a very good article and it's nice that you can go directly to anything in it that you need to understand, via the links. I read some of it but the rest will have to wait. :zzz:
 

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I feed my rabbits Coastal ( bermuda grass ) hay along with pellets. It is also great to use for nest boxes. It runs $4.00 for a square bale.
 

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Duchess of Cynicism
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"coastal" hay will uasuaLLY BE 'SALTIER' IN NATURE THAN THE 'NORMAL' TYPES OF HAY, GIVEN THE REGIONns it grows in, Timothy hay is lower in proteins than alfalfa or clover-- just about ANY grass can be hayed-- Any crop grown for grain can be 'hayed' as well-- like oats or rye-- just a matter of harvestinig method...
'orchard' grass is a specific species of grass--
if it is any consolation-- even for someone in my position--- who has tons of field guides-- the "grasses" are extremely hard to find field guides for, and it is not easy to identify the 'non regular' crop varieties (I paid over 200 bucks for a field guide to grasses-- it is TWO large volumes, with NO photographic pics-- just pen/ink line drawings!!!! It is considered to be a 'bible' among Environmental science people)
 

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In Remembrance
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Coastal is a burmuda grass. I have it growing here along with the native Texas Crabgrass. I feed both to the buns. If it is fertilized it is fairly high in protein. Crabgrass is similar to alfalfa nutritionally.
 

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Fergusons Family Farm
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I know that I have no where near the type of weather that someone in Texas has, but I feed my rabbits any type of hay that we have available. Since we grow our own I don't buy hay, and we are lucky enough that way!

WE don't grow alfalfa but there is some mixed in, along with clover. I think as long as the diet is balanced else wise, hay can be added as they eat it!

I would assume allowing them to have access to grass hay at all times, and limit the amount to the legume type hay, if thats what you have to do! Good luck in your searches.

Just wondering, but why go to the feed stores to buy your hay? Try local farmers they will have better prices and normally great hay...and if you work out a deal, he/she will hold hay for you!

Melissa
 
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