What is the best flooring in the goat barn?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Marsha, Jun 23, 2004.

  1. Marsha

    Marsha Well-Known Member

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    We are in the process of building a new barn for our pgymy goats. What do you consider the best flooring? Would it be:

    dirt
    concrete
    gravel
    wood

    Thanks, :)

    Marsha
     
  2. MC nli

    MC nli Guest

    For the floor I would say dirt since it will absorb the pee ext where as the other stuff won't. I would put like straw or something on top of the dirt though.

    MotherClucker
     

  3. I also like dirt with bedding. It's nice to have concrete in the feed/hay storage room, but you don't want little goaties jumping on it. You'd be surprised how easily they can break their little legs. (I had a kid break a leg once when it bounced onto the feed can and back down onto a concrete floor.) Wood would absorb bacteria and be nasty, imo.
    Gravel sounds good, but how would you keep it clean? No, I'd go with dirt.
    mary
     
  4. ForMyACDs

    ForMyACDs Well-Known Member

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    I have concrete, but I put rubber stall mats over any area the goats reside for cushion. It's SO darn easy to clean!
     
  5. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    DIRT for warmth in cold climates and drainage.

    Mine strew enough hay to make a nice bedding for themselves. I clean 2 times a year if they are lucky!

    A little slope is also a plus for good drainage. In the summer my girls like to paw and roll in the kids sandpile and driveway....they get all frisky about 4-5pm every day and play in the sandpile...Its quite a sight!
     
  6. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I had dirt floors and wasn't happy with the drainage. Once the dirt got compacted, it was pretty well waterproof. So when we moved, I put wooden floors into the goat pen, figuring the urine would drain between the boards into the dirt below, and the dirt wouldn't get compacted because the goats weren't standing on it. I got those cheap cedar fence boards and laid them side by side on two-by-fours laid on their sides. Because the fence boards are only about 1/2 inch thick, I spaced the two-by-fours about a foot apart for good support. Then just used the drill driver to screw the cedar to the two-by-fours. It was easy and inexpensive, and it's worked out really well for keeping the bedding drier. It's also easy to clean.
     
  7. jim/se kansas

    jim/se kansas Well-Known Member

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    I have dirt with six inchs of rock in my barn. It works good and drains well.
    Hope this helps.
    Jim
     
  8. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wooden floors = RATS just remember that ,I would use wood over concrete if theres money for it.
     
  9. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I have dirt floors and put wood chips on it in the summer and straw in the winter for added warmth. BUT!

    I have learned from the ladies I trust to know, that dirt base with sand on it is the best! In the winter you just don't clean up the spilled hay and it builds up for warmth. I can see how that would be soooooo much easier to clean. In the Spring when you get those big thick chunks of old bedding, it would be much easier to pick them up off of a sand base. It is supposed to be easier to rake goat berries from in the summer. Also cooler.Makes good since to me. :)

    Now my problem is how to get enough sand here to do the job.
     
  10. Galloping Goats

    Galloping Goats Active Member

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    We used the plain old ground with a couple of inches of crushed gravel then plenty of straw. I tried the rubber mats and hated them because they didn't let the urine drain out. I guess if you clean every week like some people do it wouldn't be too bad but we only clean about once a month or so. Depends on time and weather. I like the sand idea though. We are building a barn as soon as my contracter reappears :( . I think I'll try gravel then sand maybe.
     
  11. havenberryfarm

    havenberryfarm Well-Known Member

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    We're building a barn soon too. I like the gravel and sand idea too. Seems like the gravel would also deter animals that burrow. Gravel isn't too comfie to dig under. Maybe it would help keep mice out???? We are also thinking about using a concrete block foundation to keep mice and rats from digging through. We are going to use deep litter in the stalls. We might incorporate red worms in with the chicken litter too. Don't know if it would work for goats, tho. A deep litter system produces compost right there in the stall and the extra decomposition helps keep the animals warm. The trick is to keep drainage good so that there is not too much ammonia, and to keep litter fine and easily broken down. You also have to stir it every week and add more fresh on the top. It has to be at least 6 inches thick at all times. I hope it works. I am not terribly worried if it doesn't. We are just starting out and will have extra stalls if we need to do a little cleaning out.
     
  12. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have used the deep bedding system for years over dirt and it work fine for me. I just keep adding straw in the winter and clean it out in the Spring and Late Fall. My chickens run in the barn all the time and do the "stiring" for me so when I clean it out it's almost completely composted. Letting the chicken have the run of the goat barn relly cuts down on parasites and flies as those chickens have a good eye for anything in the straw/dirt that's edible. In 11 years I have not had any problem with ammonia odor or sickness in the herd. After each semi annual cleaning I cover the dirt real well with diamatous earth and/or gardner's lime before starting with the fresh bedding. Seems to freshen things up and gets rid of any residual bugs in the dirt. Havenberry, if you put worms in the chicken coop bedding you will not have any left in a day or 2. Outstanding protein for the chickens and they will eat every one immediately. I have trouble keeping worm in the compost pile as the chickens get in that also, but since they keep it turned over for me and eat all the weed/missed grain seeds I end up with really good weed free compost.
     
  13. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    we use dirt. In the winter, we just keep adding straw. works really well. then we haul in all out in the spring. I spray the goat house down with a bleach mixture. and then in the fall, we start adding lots of straw again. Now my vet, says to put down concrete. But we live in the north, [michigan], and our winters are cold. and IT is very hard to warm up a concrete floor, so we use dirt. the girls are happy, and that is what counts. :D :D :D :D
     
  14. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    I had dirt in the barn but decided to put down rock dust. Biggest mistake I made. It turns as hard as concrete with no drainage. My goats are so dirty right now. I just started cleaning every week, putting down shavings.

    I like that idea of the cedar panel fence. Think I will try that.

    Something I found out. Wood cinders work really great, like lime. Works great on smells. All the cinders I have left over from the woodburning stove came in handy.
     
  15. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    do you mean the ashes out of your wood stove? is that what you mean by cinders?
     
  16. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that is exactly what I mean. The charcoal absorbs the odor. It really does work.
     
  17. mysticokra

    mysticokra Well-Known Member

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    What happens when the pile of ashes gets wet? Does it become caustic? I thought leaching ashes was the first step in making lye soap.
     
  18. Galloping Goats

    Galloping Goats Active Member

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    What is rock dust? Sand?
     
  19. I worked at a walking horse breeding facility where we had Million $ studs used for stud service. The farm always bedded the stalls with quarterdown (finely crushed stone) and then cedar shavings on top. Easy to clean and keeps pests away. I do the same thing for my goats. In the summer use the cedar shavings, in the winter, bed with hay. The key is the quarterdown. It allows the urine to drain and makes it easier to clean.
     
  20. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the tip. I will try that. is the quarterdown, finer than gravel?