What IS the attraction of having fainting goats?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by bare, Apr 29, 2005.

  1. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    I've been meaning to ask this for some time now, but seeing yet another request for fainting goats drives me to ask. Why would anyone want to perpetuate a pretty obvious genetic problem?

    I have to believe that these poor creatures are more inclined to have folks sneaking up on them yelling BOO!!, in hopes of seeing thm keel over than the average goat.

    I can't help but envision in my mind, every time I hear of someone wanting to acquire goats with this trait, a vision of a group of rednecks, swilling beer on a porch, each trying to out BOO each other and laughing hysterically at their results. :no:

    There must be more to it than this isn't there?
     
  2. MMyers1

    MMyers1 Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that due to this trait, they tend to be much meatier than the average meat goat. The trait is not unlike if someone were to walk up behind you and yell boo... you would likely be startled and jerk. The goats do the same thing, but it causes their muscles to contract so severely that they fall over. They do not actually faint...

    Here is a good website:

    http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/
     

  3. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Huh.

    Well heck, if it ain't considered cruel to scare the bejeepers out of a goat, maybe I ought to start a "virtual shootin' range", and stock the field with fainting goats. Load up an assortment of shootin' irons with blanks and let folks get their jollies. Every so often I could sneak a live round in and reward the lucky shooter with a really meaty goat.
     
  4. Jack_IA

    Jack_IA Active Member

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    Originally they were set up that way to be with sheep and other critters more valuable. when a predator comes by the goats faint and make a tasty meal ,while the more expensive stock has a chance to get away.
     
  5. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Wait, wait! How about a "Fainting Goat" petting farm? Invite the humor impaired to stop out and yell BOO at your goats, but unbeknown to them, your goats are really Boer goats trained to attack on the shouted command, BOO.

    Might be able to make extra cash by setting up a video camera and sending the results to one of the funniest video shows.
     
  6. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    I am not sure which is funnier.....

    Watching the goats faint or watching the person running around with arms flailing in the air trying to make them faint.
     
  7. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    Bringing a long unused idiom back into play,

    ScapeGoat
     
  8. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    http://www.compfused.com/directlink/765/

    Is this funny or is it cruel? I honestly don't know what effect this has on the goats but I think cruel is more appropriate even though it is funny as heck.
     
  9. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    They also have a harder time scaling fences than their more nimble counterparts.
     
  10. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    well who doesnt like sneeking up on small children with epilepsy and yelling boo?

    lol
     
  11. Farmer K

    Farmer K Homesteader-@-Heart

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    It looks cruel to me. Reminds me of when my horse was sick with botulism and couldn't get up off the ground...the paniced look on his face. :(

    Kelly
     
  12. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    It might make it easier to trim hoofies. :stars:

    Lynda
     
  13. HeatherDriskill

    HeatherDriskill Well-Known Member

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    I think it's funny. If I had these goats, I wouldn't be out there terroizing them every day, but it is funny. It's not like it hurts them. But, there are those who think that rodeos are cruel, too, so.....to each his own.
     
  14. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    We have them. 6 at the moment, 2 have been sold already. They are smaller than our lamanchas, not prone to escaping, they have a natural resistance to diseases and worms, are personable and very cute. Out of the 3 adults, only 1 really collapses. The other 2 stiffen, but can stay upright and move. And no, we do not yell boo all the time. That would be assinine.

    You call it a genetic problem, I call it a genetic trait. Other then the fainting, they are hardier and healthier than other goats, forage well, and eat less grain. Makes them excellent pets, which is why we breed them.

    They have to be startled to faint, not necessarily scared. If they are already on edge, they will not faint. I have bumped into one unexpectedly and it went down. It is hard for strangers to make them faint because they are already tense and nervous.

    Have not eaten one yet, but they do seem quite meaty.

    Oh, the fainting does make it easy to catch some of them. but you have to be quick because it does not last long.

    Try one, you might like them.
     
  15. vegascowgirl

    vegascowgirl Try Me

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    I don't know about all the other stuff, but I do know that one of them taught my toddler not to chase goats anymore.

    It was about a year and a half ago. My daughter was two and into riding anything that had four legs (comes from her watching rodeo and mutton busting). We were at a friends ranch one day helping them out with a couple new horses. My daughter started chasing the goats(they had 3) in hopes of catching and riding one. I of course, was yelling at her "Don't chase the goats, they're nice goats" or something to that affect to try to keep her from running out of earshot or eyesight.. Well, I was busy with a horse in the roundpen, when suddenly my daughter rounds the corner of the tack shed bawling like crazy. I thought she had been hurt, so I leaped the fence and ran to her. When I asked what was wrong she whimpered "I'm bad girl , I sorry, I sorry"...I didn't know what in the world she had done, but figured it must have been bad to have her acting the way she was, so I asked her to show me. She took me by the hand and started leading me behind the tack shed Only to find nothing there. She started crying even harder. "goak dead, Goak gone aweady" she bawled. O.K., now I was really confused...because I couldn't figure out her problem, I just gave her a hug and told her it would all be fine and went back to working with the horse, daughter now right beside me at all times (by her choice). After a while, here came this goat trotting around happy as could be. My daughter spotted it and just had a fit, scared to death. We later figured out that she had tried to chase this goat and it had fainted. Daughter thought it had died and that she had caused it. She never chased that goat, or any other animal again...
     
  16. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Would they be easier to (catch to) do maintenacne on? Would that be a reason to breed this trait into them?
     
  17. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    Oh my goodness, that is such a cute story. I about peed my pants reading it. Thanls for sharing.

    Nikki
     
  18. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    No one knows for sure why they had this trait breed into them. Their origins are a bit of a mystery. They breed can be traced back to a single man who wandered into a town in Tennessee with some fainting goats and a cow he said was sacred, but no one knows exactly where he came from or where he got the goats. Sold the goats and left after a year of being there. No one knows where he went to. He did take the cow, tho.
     
  19. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    he of course took the cow so he could breed more fainting goats thats the key the cow was sacred remmember.
     
  20. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    I have a herd of fainters, most from Marshall County (origin) lines - they are definitely easier for the smaller farmer than any of the other 'brands' out there. They are meat goats, however they make excellent shrub clearers and milk well too.

    I thought they were 'dumb' at first before I researched why they have been bred/managed and the trait kept.

    If you want a goat that won't tear up your fences, jump up on your car, the myotonic goat is for you. They are our only landrace breed!

    There are varying ranges of the condition. I have several goats that go down when they eat a real tasty treat, and others who only go down when you chase them down. Several of mine can't step over fences, etc. It's actually caused by a chemical buildup, and it creates a goat with 40% more muscling. If you're worried about that being cruel - never eat a cornish X again or drink a doe's milk when the kid is getting cow - but to each it's own.

    As to the epilepsy comment. Since my Giant is epileptic I can say in full experience it's totally different.

    http://www.faintinggoat.com/ is one of the registries -

    here are a few of my fainters - and you'll see the appeal!


    Here's Amos one of my wether's frozen - he tried to climb up the porch - this is what keeps them in fences - http://a8.cpimg.com/image/70/98/51890288-0fcd-00800060-.jpg

    My blue buckling Waylon - http://a6.cpimg.com/image/D2/A3/51882706-4fb6-02000180-.jpg
    he's not going to get too much bigger, may even end up a mini. I have a great pic of him with my 2 yo daughter. He was bottle fed, and is a bit annoying but like a dog with hooves!


    Now as to the meat factor - check out Skunk - he's an example of how great these guys bulk up with the muscle contractions -
    http://www.freewebs.com/brassringfarm/SkunkBackLot.jpg He was just recently sold out west (was a father to one of the goats I have)

    And this is a Wells buck - Miss Mary Wells is one of those top names in Marshall Co goats - my black doe originally (http://a5.cpimg.com/image/BD/9A/51890365-c5b5-02000180-.jpg) came from Wells and was exposed to this guy -
    http://www.freewebs.com/brassringfarm/Burke.jpg - if all goes well I'm thinking about Nov/Dec I'll have some polled belted kids (another positive for fainters - they are known for multiple kids - 3-4 are not uncommon)

    Just look at that muscling on a goat that is about 1/2-3/4 size of a Boer!

    Stepping down from my pedestal now. I didn't get fainters for over a year because I was ignorant to the potential as a livestock animal for my small farm. If I had started earlier, I would already be on the profit side of things! I have five acres, and these guys are doing a great job at keeping things clean, and never wander too far - I use a 2 foot fence to protect my garden - no problems since I've put it up ;-p

    Interesting note on the guy who brought them - he did marry a local lol - left HER too!

    Andrea
    Shanghai Shaggies
    member IFGA, ALBC