What is it? (with pictures)

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by CountryGoalie, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    We have this tree in our pasture. Today I glanced up and realized that there were berries beginning to ripen on it. I have absolutely no clue what kind of tree it is, nor whether or not the berries are edible. If they are, I'd like to begin gathering them - but I don't want to do so if they're something that might make me sick. Here are some shots of the leaves and berries, as well as of the tree itself.

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    Oh, and we're located in central NY. Zone three, I think? I'm not sure, I haven't begun researching gardening too deeply yet, although I hope to start an herb garden next year. :shrug:
     
  2. tillandsia

    tillandsia Well-Known Member

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    It's a Mulberry! Perfectly safe for you and your animals to eat. They are in the same family as figs. Hope you enjoy them.
     

  3. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    They are delicious too. A late freeze killed every berry I had on four trees. I am very jealous now.
     
  4. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Gettin hungry. I've got a weeping mulberry that I have to wrap to keep the deer away from. Summer isn't summer without mulberries.
     
  5. BeeFree

    BeeFree Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's a mulberry and its loaded. When they turn black purple eat away.
     
  6. ShortSheep

    ShortSheep Well-Known Member

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    I've got a bunch of these back by the creek. I've been gathering quite a few of them.
    Any opinions on how well they freeze?
     
  7. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    They freeze real well. Also great for jelly and wine.
     
  8. chuckhole

    chuckhole Born city, love country

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    We have made both mullberry jelly and wine. Good stuff. We even forced some of the wine to go to vinegar. It is ironic that the "gourmet" vinegars cost more than the "country" wines when vinegar is really a winemaking mistake.

    Crush the berries, strain the juice and bring it to a boil before you freeze it. This will stop the natural fermentation.
     
  9. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    i alwasy liked them when they still had some pink on them, the all the way ripe is a little over done for me,
    BUT if you mix in some Rubbarb its an AWSOME jelly.
     
  10. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow, that tree is loaded! Our everbearer is still producing but only a couple a day (all of ours are very young trees). Can't wait til they get to be the size of yours.
     
  11. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    Always the one to throw a monkey wrench in a perfectly good conversation...I'll also say keep your car away from birds who dine on this particular fruit. I absolutely LOVE mulberries but never appreciated the purple bird-splats on my white car!

    BTW...does anyone know if there are 'male' and 'female' mulberry trees? We have on the farm that has classic mulberry leaves, it produces 'fruit' that looks identical to mulberry but whereas true fruit are juicy and fleshy these are green, broccoli-like flowerettes of some type.
     
  12. bee

    bee WV , hilltop dweller Supporter

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    the unripe fruits contain hallucinogens....
    I planted a mulbery close to my cherry trees as a "trap" crop for the birds so they would leave my cherries alone.