What is crazy to me...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Hip_Shot_Hanna, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    What is crazy to me is going out and buying tasteless tomatoes, heavily fertilized and sprayed produce that has been rushed to maturity and market, (devoid of not only flavor, but minerals and vitamins), beef that has been fed hormones, and antibiotics, and milk that has hormones in it that cause precocious puberty in our children. Do I buy such things? Only because we have only begun our venture into homesteading in the past six months.

    BUT - we had a small garden with the time we had to put it in, and harvested tomatoes, green beans, peas, squash, garlic, and corn. I'm still canning surplus tomatoes. I bought a grain mill and am grinding wheat to make whole wheat bread, from grain that is not treated with pesticides. Bread that is made with goat milk, honey, molasses, whole wheat, olive oil, and no white flour. (Yeah, I love white bread, but I know it isn't the best choice, and this whole wheat bread is darn good)

    We just bought chickens so we can have our own eggs - goodness knows there are enough grasshoppers around here to feed an army of hens. Just waiting for these girls to grow up - then they will have all the bugs they can eat, plus some scratch grain at night.

    We also just bought a milking doe and a young doeling so we have fresh goat milk - surplus of which either goes to my daughter to feed her one year old, or the dogs and chickens get the surplus, which cuts down on their feed bill. And we have at least 10 acres for those two goats to clear up if times get hard and we can't buy alfalfa hay.

    I"ve already managed to stop going to the store for bread or milk in the past six months. In another six months, I won't have to go to the store for eggs either. And hopefully next year, I won't have to go to the store for vegetables either. We WILL go to the feed store occasionally I'm sure.

    I give my dogs their vaccinations, which I order from a vet supply that delivers them packed in ice - and the cost of those 25 shots that I bought covers TWO puppy shots. I have three dogs that are all puppies, so I've come out ahead even if some of the shots expire. And they are good until late next year.

    The one thing I haven't figured out how to produce is butter from goat's milk, and I suspect I might not care for it as much as cow butter. I am not going to buy a cream separator for one or two goats, so we just drink it or cook with it.

    This fall we are putting in more fruit trees, and planning a BIG garden for next spring. We are planning to put in a solar powered water pump for the well, so if electric goes belly up we still have water. And we plan to put in a small wood stove for heating the house. If possible, we'd like to put in enough solar/wind power to at least keep the fridge, freezer, washer and lights going. (And maybe this computer :nerd: )

    Oh yeah.. I forgot to mention - we are having the time of our life.

    So - what is crazy to you?
     
  2. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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    You're living my dream, darlin!
     

  3. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think you answered your own question. If you aren't capable of growing your own, you buy. Consider that there is a whole generation of people who have never tasted pastured meat or fresh from the garden vegetables. They don't know what they're missing. Most people don't do any research into how their food is produced; most people don't do any research into anything, medical, nutritional, or sociological. If someone tries to inform them, they don't want to know because it would mean they'd have to think about what they are doing and make major lifestyle changes.

    Why not put your goats on pasture now instead of feeding them hay? Goats are very thrifty and do very well on poor pasture. You can use portable electric fencing if you are not prepared to put up electric wire. You can seperate the cream from the milk by just letting it sit and naturally seperate. I'm sure the butter will be delicious.

    I think it's wonderful that you and your family are making the break from the commercial food chain. Have fun :dance:
     
  4. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    Maura, actually the goats are in a two acre section that contains loads of scrub for them to eat, briars, young tender trees, bushes. However, as one of them is being milked, I like to give them some alfalfa hay.

    These goats must have been somebodies pets. All they do all day long so far (we've only had them since Tuesday) is stand at the fence, look at the house and cry. They aren't doing much foraging for themselves yet, it seems they don't know HOW... never thought I'd have to teach a goat to eat browse :rolleyes:
     
  5. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    :shrug: I don't understand the problem other tha Solar Power,and worrying about Electric.Lived most my life without Electric.Got it and a Phone 10 years ago love it.

    Funny me and my wife was just talking if Electric goes up like Gas,just start getting rid of stuff,pull our Pump from the Well,and buy more Canning Jars.

    big rockpile
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Ain't that just THE most totally irritating thing? I had a pair of goats like that once. They lasted about 2 wks then I carted them back where I got them! I'm willing to supplement with alfalfa pellets for poor browse, but expect the goats to eat something else other than pellets and not beller constantly about it either! LOL I like my little LaMancha doe. She is a sweetie. Her bud moved next door, at my insistance, they have a higher tolerance than I do, and I replaced her with a wether who is MUCH more laid back.
     
  7. Sherrynboo

    Sherrynboo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    HipshotHannah, that is exactly what we are doing! We have not had to buy eggs for a couple of years now. We finally have a milking goat and the milk is wonderful! We have to share with the baby right now but soon enough, she will be weaned. I am looking forward to making cheese, yogurt and butter. I have noticed that the cream separates after being in the frige for a couple of hours. The garden did beautifully this year and everyone has raved about the tomatoes! I just tell them the flavor is from the goat and chicken dung, haha! I have canned salsa and tomato soup so far and still have more to go. I am about ready to get started with the fall garden now so the tomatoes will be gone soon. I love this life and would not trade it for anything! If I could just stay home all the time instead of work, my life would be complete. At least I don't have to do the 9-5 routine so I am grateful for that!

    Sherry in GA
     
  8. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Please cite proof. Thank you.
     
  9. myheaven

    myheaven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whats weird to me is "modren day" stuff. I live like you. Im normal everyone else is weird. When you let the goat milk sit overnight in the fridge does it seperate?? If so skimm off the cream and put it into a canning jar and shake. You then have butter.
     
  10. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    http://www.preventcancer.com/consumers/general/milk.htm

    American dairy products are banned in Europe because of the hormones in them.

    Can Hormones in Food Harm Kids?

    http://www.checnet.org/healthehouse/education/articles-detail.asp?Main_ID=127

    Ok, my mistake. It's not been proven - it is a possible cause for concern. However, these hormones are banned from use by the European Union for their own dairy farmers. One thing you cannot claim is that it is "natural" to inject a cow with a synthetic man made hormone that will increase milk production at the expense of the cow's health. Just another Franken Food, brought to you by Monsanto.
     
  11. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    I did that when mine were pups. Do be aware though that a vet usually has to give them their rabies vaccine. At least here it needs to be on record that the vet gave the dog it's rabies vaccine for it to "count". Just in case your dog ever bites anyone.

    We are also trying to grow most everything we eat or at least get it from local farmers that do not use all the hormones, etc. Isn't it great to see your own jars of canned goods lined up on a shelf??
     
  12. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    You go, girl! There is NO comparison between home grown meat, eggs, veggies, fruit and raw milk products!!!

    Everyone should read "The Untold Story of Milk" by Ron Schmidt. It is excellent!

    Our eggs are sooo fresh---and with all the insects and weeds my hens eat, their yolks are deep orange and huge! I just don't know why everyone pauses, and says "Thanks, Jill!" so sarcastically when I mention that! The bugs are converted to protien, minerals and vitamins, after all!

    When I bought some meat from a home raised pig, I realized that I had been missing the taste of real meat as much as the taste of real veggies. I hadn't realized that meat has been as bland and tastless and lacking in nutrition as supermarket veggies and fruit. Until now!


    Willow, honey, PLEASE don't hijack this thread into a pasteurized, store bought vs. raw milk thread...it is about enjoying the products of your own homestead. I know plenty of dairy farmers in our heavily dairy producing area who CLAIM not to use hormones, but buy it black market and use them anyway. I personally know one with over 3,000 cows, a big supplier. His place and his milk is so filthy that when the inspectors come, he puts some bleach IN THE MILK in the bulk tank, as they don't test for that. To lower the somatic cell count.

    I just don't think you are going to convince anyone who prefers their own homegrown raw milk about the safety and purity of Monsanto milk. So leave us alone, 'kay? Please?

    BTW, Hanna, you could always get a mini-cow if you want to make your own butter. You can also make a lot of cheese, enough to give some away. You can make goat cheese, cow cheese, and a combination of both. It will mean adjusting the temps, times and watching the time of renneting, but it is all good!

    Blessings on you, girl! Keep on keeping on!
     
  13. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Wendy - it's the same here, rabies vaccination must be given by the vet. I didn't make that clear. All other vaccinations can be given by anyone. My vet accepts my dog records - I just peel off the label on the little vial and date when it was given, so that's kind of nice.

    And yes! It does give a nice feeling of satisfaction to see your own jars of home canned foods. :)