What is arnica?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by moopups, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

    Messages:
    7,102
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    Its been mentioned twice in my earlier thread about takeing a fall.
     
  2. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,030
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Hi! I missed the threads about the fall, but arnica can be used to treat bruises and sprains. It is normally used in a compress or ointment for those particular applications. It shouldn't be taken internally.
     

  3. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,030
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    I'm sorry. After going back I realized I didn't answer the original question. It's an alpine plant, botanical name Arnica montana. Sometimes a variety called Arnica fulgens is also used. Hope this helps!
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    15,598
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    I think it has something to do with the book, "The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe."
     
  5. Cheryl in SD

    Cheryl in SD Living in the Hills Supporter

    Messages:
    4,534
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    South Dakota
    You can take it homeopathically. When my kids get bumped and bruised (hey, they're kids!) I give them a dose. I have been amazed at the reduction of bruising since we started using it. It also helps with falls or accidents to reduce pain. You can get it at natural/health food stores.
     
  6. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    Arnica is a plant, a herb. (Arnica montana, A mollis). Herbaceous perennial, also known as Mountain Tobacco, Mountain Arnica, Leopard's Bane and Sneezewort. Grows close to the ground. The hairy-looking, oval leaves form a flat rosette, from the centre of which rises a flower stalk, 30-60cm high, bearing orange-yellow flowers. The rhizome is dark brown, cylindrical, usually curved, and bears brittle wiry rootlets on the under surface. Flowers appear in mid-summer.

    Not recommended for internal use, although it is used in homoeopathy for a range of conditions. Used internally, it is a heart tonic, improves circulation, reduces cholesterol and stimulates the central nervous system. Flowers are used in oil infusions, compresses and ointments to treat bruises, shingles, sprains and muscular pain, dislocations, abscesses, boils, ulcers, bursitis, chilblains, varicose ulcers, dislocations, swollen feet. Applied as a cream or ointment to affected areas or a well diluted tincture is used as a hair rinse to treat falling hair. Soak a cloth in the tea and use it as a compress to relieve headaches and visual disturbances following concussion.

    Mostly the flowers are used, but the root is also used.

    Warning: Do not use on broken skin. Can cause intestinal bleeding, abdominal cramping, increased blood pressure and even death when taken internally. Can cause contact dermatitis when used externally, especially by fair-haired persons. Avoid when pregnant.

    Some pix here:

    http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&q=arnica+montana&btnG=Search+Images
     
  7. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,108
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    Location:
    Washington State
    Okay, here's my arnica question; what percentage rate can it be used at, or can you use it straight on your skin? I bought some oil a year or two ago and never used it because no one seemed to know the answer, and I'd love to make a cream or ointment with it.
     
  8. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

    Messages:
    6,677
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Location:
    Near Charlotte NC
    I think most of the oil that is sold is safe to use on your skin. I've never seen it sold as an essential oil.
     
  9. ldc

    ldc Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,421
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Location:
    S. Louisiana
    Moopups, All the health food stores in my town sell Arnica cream for bruises and skin problems. Most of it is from Germany, where it is still routinely used for all manner of skin problems. Works, too! ANY health food store will have it! ldc
     
  10. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    Harvesting: Collect flowers when fully opened and use fresh or dried. Root is taken in autumn after the leaves have died down. The entire plant can be dried and then powdered; it can then be mixed with equal portions of petroleum jelly or mineral oil for external use.
     
  11. Karen

    Karen Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,537
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2002
    Location:
    Beautiful SW Mountains of Virginia
    You can take Arnica internally as a tincture. In fact, there are several studies that show it can aid in regulating blood sugar in diabetics. You just have to be careful and not go crazy with it because it is toxic to some people; but just about anyone can take Arnica tincture by the drops.

    I make Anrica tincture and my husband has been using it for his diabetes. He does 3 drops 3 times a day in a tad of water. No dramatic results yet, but it does take several weeks to kick in.