What grows good in poor drainage area?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ravenlost, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have about three acres between the county road and our front drainage ditch that needs to be productive. Unfortunately, it doesn't drain well and, depending on the weather, will hold water for months at a time. Any idea on what I can plant successfully in that area?

    Only thing I can think of is rice, but I'm not set up to irrigate it when the weather is dry.
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    We've got the same thing. I hope you get lots of suggestions!
     

  3. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not even a hint of a suggestion yet suelandress!
     
  4. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    :(
    How about frogs....nice delicacy :haha: :haha: :haha:
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...I have plenty of those to get started with!
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Canary grass will grow in swampy ground. It will come up very early in the spring even if there is a foot of water standing there. An acre of it will pasture at least two cows from early spring to fall freeze. It will get about three feet tall and put on seed heads. To make good pasture, it should be mowed when it gets up around two feet tall. It will make 2 cuttings of hay that cattle eat pretty well. When it gets established the root system will support a tractor even when it is standing in water. It can be planted whenever the ground can be worked up. It will spread into the wetland if you can't work the ground anytime. It will grow well on highground, but not a well as in wampy ground.
     
  7. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hmmm...how does it do during dry spells? This area isn't exactly "swampy", it just has poor drainage during rainy spells. Right now it's dry as a bone.
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Bamboo? There are about a bazillion varieties. Many are very useful. You could grow the really big stuff and use for building material. Some of the smaller diameter makes good fish poles. Lots of the shoots are edible. Prob find a market for some of it.
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It has roots that go down about 7 feet. There is a few patches of it here on high and dry ground, but it never quits growing, and always stays very green. Te first I planted any was in the sixtys. I had a 3.5 acre wet place in the corner of a row crop field. When the ground (Muck) dried out in the middle of summer I plowed and harrowed it. Then I used the old drill to plant the REEDS CANARY GRASS. After the next year I built a fence around it and put 15 yearling beef heifers in it. The grass was above their bellys when I put the in in May, and they stayed there until fall, but never did get it eaten down. I learned later that it makes better pasture if it is kept from getting to tall. I never fertilize or lime the ground. It will make you more money with cattle than any other thing you could plant. Once is all you ever need to plant it.
     
  10. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow...that sounds good to me uncle Will! I'll definitely have to look into canary grass.

    NO BAMBOO!!! LOL...that stuff is as bad as the kudzu.
     
  11. patches like that in my parts are just baren they alternate between wetlands drawing wild mallards to dry bare spots during dry spells no crop here works on them the only cure i know of is soil levaling to facilitate draining off excess water and bring it up higher than the surounding dirt and ditches i live on plains flat as a pankake here.
     
  12. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Do cranberries grow in Mississippi? They grow in bogs. Cypress trees grow in swamps. I don't know how long they take to mature, but it's used for lumber.
     
  13. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    You're in Mississippi...raise alligators. Buy hatchlings and sell them to the meat/leather market when the water dries up. Build a pond and keep several of them for breeding stock.
     
  14. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...I'm in NORTH Mississippi. No alligators here, but I probably have a good crop of water moccasins.

    Not sure what we'll do with this space. I told hubby I was going to start a Christmas tree farm there.

    It does need some soil brought in to build it up. On one side part of the topsoil has been scrapped away (I had a fit last year when I found out the builder was using our topsoil to build our 1/2 mile driveway. We'd told them to haul in dirt.).

    I really wanted to use the space for crop rotation. Not sure now.
     
  15. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    How about a pond? Everyone needs another one. You could use the dirt as fill to level off the rest of the area. If it stays full year round you could raise catfish. That'd be cool. If it didn't hold water year round, plant the banks with moisture loving natives like willow and cattails. Mother Earth News had an article about this a couple of months ago, as a way of handling storm runoff. If the topsoil is gone already, you could certainly use this as fill dirt and have topsoil brought in to put ontop of the rest of the area.
     
  16. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Hey! You could raise some fresh water shrimp!!!! And invite everyone here to come down for a fry!!
     
  17. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    If it's wet anyway, making it into several ponds & growing fish comes to mind... or can you tile it? What about blueberries? They like damp areas, don't they? Could you pasture raise geese on it, if you had grass that would do well there? Maybe geese AND berries?
     
  18. horses43

    horses43 Member

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    Is Canary Grass good for horses too? I have a swampy area that it should do fine in if it grows well in Georgia.
     
  19. poorme

    poorme Well-Known Member

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  20. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Lots of smaller ponds. One for shrimp. One for catfish. One for tilapia in the summer.

    I can turn right on Hwy 78 and be in Mississippi in about an hour. When's the fish fry? My wife mixes up the best batter for fried catfish. Cornmeal, paprika and garlic salt. We'll come over early and help you clean the fish.