What eats hedge apples?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by zealot, Oct 6, 2006.

  1. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    I know that they are inedible to humans, and that they can be used as cockroach control, but in the animal world, does anyone eat hedge apples? I have seen the trees over a cattle field, and the cattle didn't seem to want anything to do with them. They don't seem edible, especially with their thick glue, but I don't know for sure if some critter doesn't eat them.
     
  2. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

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    squirrels love them! If you want some I have tons to give away if you want to pay postage! :)
     

  3. tillandsia

    tillandsia Well-Known Member

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    According to the Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osage-orange article on Osage orange (Maclura pomifera):
    These people sell them!
    http://www.osagehedgeballs.com/Default.htm
     
  4. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

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    My husband said deer will eat them when there is nothing else to eat in the winter.
     
  5. peacebaker

    peacebaker Well-Known Member

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    We have an over-priced "fruit stand" near my house that sells produce, cheese etc. They had a display of fall items, indian corn, etc. and had hedge apples for THREE DOLLARS each! (and a sign that said inedible, ha ha).

    I thought it was pretty funny since you can pick them up off the ground all over town. I'm sure somebody bought them though!
     
  6. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    I have heard that you can place them under and in your home and pest like fleas don't like them and will leave. Anyone else heard that?
     
  7. moodcouple

    moodcouple Well-Known Member

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    We had a German Shepherd who chewed them (they looked like the yellow tennis balls he was used to playing with) and it killed him. Made his throat swell shut.
     
  8. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    Yep, people swear they keep spiders and insects OUT of your house.

    I used to work in a greenhouse, and the owners knew where there was a tree and picked all they could. They brought them to the greenhouse and sold them as hedge apples that were to keep spiders and insects out of a house. They sold them for about $1.00 each, and sold out of them EVERY time!

    holleegee is going to send me some! I just like the looks of them and YES, we do keep them around the house to repel spiders and such!
     
  9. littlebitfarm

    littlebitfarm Scotties rule! Supporter

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    My horses love them. They even pick them off the tree!

    Kathie
     
  10. kenuchelover

    kenuchelover Well-Known Member

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    Some cows DO eat them, some don't. It seems to be a roughly 50/50 thing. And yes, squirrels love them..... I think turkeys do as well. Some insects just love them to death, as well.

    They contain latex (natural rubber, just like Rubber Trees & Guayale plants do) in fairly high levels. Commercial extraction of it has occasionally been looked into.
     
  11. holleegee

    holleegee Well-Known Member

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  12. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    I cut them in half and put them all under the house. We hardly evere see a spider or bug. Now if I could get something put there to git the mice out.
     
  13. tweety

    tweety Tweety

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    When I had a Camp Fire Girls troop we would cut hedge apples into slices and let them dry a bit, they look like big daisies, then we would stick them on wires and make bouquets. They don't last forever but they are big and pretty and have a nice fragrance.
     
  14. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    How do you get the squirrels to stay in the envelope? :shrug:
     
  15. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Osage Orange wood is some of the most beautiful I've ever seen. I've heard that you can still find old fence post that were made from Osage Orange wood that are still in great shape. It's a very hard wood, so I'm thinking if you plan some of those "hedge apples" now...your great-grandchildren might have enough to make fence post later?

    Hugs
    marlene
     
  16. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Osage orange is also one of the best bow woods -- but you all knew that already, didn't you?

    Kathleen
     
  17. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    with a large sling shot, you can use them as artillery ammo to attack the neighbors.

    they will think they are being attacked by aliens.
     
  18. RandB

    RandB Well-Known Member

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    I had a horse who considered them a great delicacy. There was an old hedgerow near his pasture, he would hang out there in the fall, waiting for them to fall so he could gobble them up!
     
  19. kenuchelover

    kenuchelover Well-Known Member

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    Plant them now, and YOU will have enough to make fence posts. It's a fast growing wood. (The "hedge" part of the name refers to just that, it's use in managed hedges..... where you'd go in and cut the regrowth every 5 or so years for use as fenceposts).
     
  20. kenuchelover

    kenuchelover Well-Known Member

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    That gives me a great idea.... make a cannon to fire them out of. The only problem might be if the latex starts fouling the barrel..... or will the burning powder scour it clean?

    This way, if revenuers or ravaging hordes from the city ever show up, you'll be prepared! Works on tax collectors, salesmen, and scientologists as well!