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What does 'Survival and Emergency Prep" mean to you?

At it's most basic it means self-reliance. Long-term, short-term, any-term it's about as being self-reliant and self-capable as you care to be. Not having to be dependent on the government, charity, whatever for lack of any choice.

In the context of this sub-forum of a hometeading board in here it has more to do with shorter-term emergencies than what is generally thought of as "homesteading." But there are some prep aspects of homesteading that we discuss here that are not often discussed in the other boards so there is some over lap.

Self-reliance is where it's at. Surviving ordinary day-to-day life to get to TEOTWAWKI then surviving that if and when it happens.

.....Alan.
 
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Homesteading=sustainability=survival and emergency prep=sustainability=homesteading.

(For me)

As I said, "self-sufficient" is an idea I am trying to move away from. I don't think it's attainable, desirable or healthy to try to be "self-sufficient".

Much of this thinking started spiritually for me.

We are not made to be "Self-sufficient".

In fact, in perfection, in the Garden, the only thing God pronounced that was "not good" was for man to be alone.

Furthermore, Satan's temptation to Eve (and Adam who was beside her at the time), was really, in a lot of respects, to be more self-sufficient.

God created Adam and Eve to be God-sufficient.

They (and we I would argue) were to work together with our family and to ultimately understand that it's God who was supplying their needs. They worked the Garden (even in perfection there was work) together, but God created the Garden, the sun, the mist to water the garden and gave the increase.

When I began to seek "self-sufficiency", I began to forget the real things the God has given us that are eternal (our souls and the souls of those around us) are much more important than the carnal, passing items and pleasures that we really heap around us.

THOSE things are given to us solely for the purpose of securing the eternal things. Man's purpose is to bring Glory to God and all the stuff he created and gave us is for that purpose.
I like that whole post Bob. Very interesting thoughts
 

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When I say, "self-sufficient" I mean "not being a wage slave". Not trading hours of your life for a paycheck.

Try as I may, I can't bake. So I'm perfectly willing to trade things I can make myself for fresh baked bread. To be truly self-sufficient I would need to do all of those things myself, but in my case that would mean doing without in many cases. I'm good at the organic aspects of farming. I can grow stuff. I tend to fail at many of the other aspects, such as engineering and maintenance of equipment. I've been blessed with some neighbors who are good at those aspects, so we have achieved a measure of self-sufficiency through community. I think that was the way it was supposed to be.
 

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Survival is not a situation that I look forward to so I Prepare so that on those days that I have worked so hard around the homestead that I'm too tired to want to eat...I can just open a jar of home canned/home grown food eat a bit and fall asleep.

Serious I'm in crunch time with the 10 cord of wood and snow flying....my husband is away at hunting camp and I have worked so hard that going to bed was ALL I wanted to do. I'm pooped, I'm sore and I'm off to do more #$%^ing wood....my husband will be liking the new trimmer version of me when he gets home...but I'll just want to sleep!

It's not so charming.... survival and preparing and homesteading.
 

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Originally, I was preparing for power outages, then Peak Oil. Now I am trying to get us braced for the building economic storm.
 

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Yes self sufficient isn't the right definition. I would have to rephrase that to mean work towards and close to that, but not quite there. It would be good to be able to live that way for a period of time in case needed, and maybe have some sort of back up plan to be able to survive longer without help. I do need to heat my house, so need fuel for the chainsaw. I need fuel for the car/tractor. If one breaks down I will need parts. I also realize to grow all the food needed for my 2 kids and I would take time. Quite a large mountain to climb alone. Instead I would choose the luxury of buying some supplies, and grow others. Cooking spices is another luxury. Gosh I almost forgot clothing.
After visiting my father in the hospital today I also realized it can be important to have a partner working toward the same goal. If you get sick or break something you will probably need some help.
 

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I'm a pretty self sufficient guy as it is, gardening, hunting, cooking, food preservation, etc. I've learned how to be self reliant because I had to be as I lived an isolated life in a remote area of AK. However, the toughest part of being in that situation was trying to stay mentally focused regardless of how many preps I had taken care of. As an example I can tell you that going through 4 months of harsh winter conditions is no picnic in and of its self let alone not hearing another human voice in that amount of time. So that said, I believe being prepared mentally is as important as any prep you might grow, buy or procure. JMO
 

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I will post first, then read responses.

To me it means to be ready for the worst and by preparing, live the best. We live this way because to us it is the best way to rase our children. Out here we connect with people, and each other. To be ready to survive the big stuff means that when the small stuff hits (job loss last summer) or the wind blows (blizzard last week, only one 85 mph gust and 2-3 feet of snow here) you don't worry, life just goes on and you can let it happen. You get to enjoy the extra time together and you get to work together as a family for the sustaining things of life.

I don't come here and get depressed, I get inspired to try new things and face the future with courage. Life can't be any harder for us than it was for my grandparents. They started out in a soddy with the things that would fit in one wagon pulled behind a team of horses. If they could do it, so can we and the great thing is that we (right now) don't have to.
 

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Semper Fidelis
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Let's See -

For me it means being prepared for "Seismic Events" from living in Earthquake Country!! They can occur at any time with no forewarning, unlike other natural disasters like hurricanes, winter storms, tornadoes, floods, etc... I have been a card carrying Certifed Disaster Worker in Communications for almost 20 years now. So I do training in large scale exercises for many possible very scarry disaster scenarios at the State level, at least twice a year.

I am ready to be snowed in/ survive severe rain storms for several days at a time, without going hungry, being cold, or sitting here in the dark.. Many times I have heated my dinner or hot water on the woodstove, when the commerical power goes away! My parents were children during the Great Depression, and taught us kids to make sure that we could take care of ourselves. My grandparents (dad's parents) showed us youngsters how to do lots of things, when we went to visit the farm in Oklahoma during the summers.

My only bummer is that my oven is electric, instead of propane or natural gas. So no baking bread or goodies when the power is out, like I could at the old place down the hill.. I haven't tried a reflector oven in front of the firewood stove open door yet.... Or my small Coleman oven on top of the woodstove. Ah, an experiment for the next power outage - Brownies baked on top of the wood stove, in the collapseable oven!!!!

If I feel the need to talk to someone else, I can turn on my amateur radios and possibly talk around the world. I have smaller solar power panels and a battery bank (240 Amp Hours), dedicated to my radio equipment.

The weapons and ammunition part comes from being a "Gun Happy Marine" (as my neighbor's jokingly call me) for many years, long before it became fashionable. The U.S. Marine Corps ingrained the need for weapons and ammunition, from when I was a Marine Rifleman.

Also knowing my neighbors and assisting each other, is an important part of prepping. The closest neighbors on the private road and myself have had firewood parties, every couple of weeks to lighten the work load for everyone. Even though I primarily grow trees up here on the hilltop (timber production zone), I know that I will not be cold this coming winter - from a lack of firewood.
 

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It's the way we grew up, our famlies always preped during the summer and fall for the following winter and spring til the new crops came. there was always a couple thousand jars of fruit,vegtables,meat,hams and bacon hanging, a bin full of potatoes,beets and carrots packed in sand, parsnips left in the garden to dig as needed.Animals in the barn that we prepped for also.
we got a little lazy in the 60s-70s due to lack of time but have come back to reallity ful time now.
 
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