What does Rural Lifestyle mean to you?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by kesoaps, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Recently there was an article in the local paper about a guy who'd like to 'develop' his property. He's got, oh, I dunno...about six hundred acres on the top of a mountain. Okay, big hill, but for some geographic regions it's a mountain. He'd like to have a cluster of homes at the top, with one or two acre parcels, then leave the rest 'forested'.

    Now, several of the homeowners in the area (those at the bottom of the really big hill) are complaining. They don't want him to build homes, saying it doesn't fit with the 'rural lifestyle' that the area is designated as. They would prefer he sell 20 acre parcels.

    So I'm left wondering...does someone need acreage to live a rural lifestyle? Is a lifestyle dependant on how much acreage a person owns?
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    No, not really. One could live on a small lot with a house in a rural zone away from a town or subdivision. Even a village away from any big town would be considered rural. Putting a big subdivision of houses anywhere may be rural by technical address if it's not within, or next to a city. :shrug:
     

  3. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What Moonwolf said, but I would add that for me personally, the more wide open the spaces and the less crowded the horizon is with human built structures, the better I like it.
     
  4. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    Well, by definition, rural means 'open spaces' (i.e. country as opposed to urban or suburban). Now, you don't need acreage to live a 'homesteading' lifestyle; that can be done on a suburban lot. So to answer your question, I'd say yes, you would need acreage to live a 'rural lifestyle'.
     
  5. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea what a rural lifestyle is any more than I know what homesteading is. What in the world is a lifestyle? Do people in other countries have lifestyles or need to define or put a title on whatever it is they do?
     
  6. Txsteader

    Txsteader Well-Known Member

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    Well, my name ain't Webster, but here goes:

    Homesteading, in today's culture, is defined as a 'back to the land' or self sufficient lifestyle. Homesteaders, for example, might raise crops & livestock, preserve their own food, etc. A suburban lot can support a vegetable garden, some fruit trees and a few chickens.

    There are many people who don't fit into the homesteader concept, but simply enjoy 'breathing room' and open vistas, so they buy rural properties that are away from cities and suburbs.
     
  7. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    for me it means being able to do what I want on my land .
    I couldnt stand having neighbors tryig to tell me what color I can paint my house ,or whether i could have chickens or not . And I sure dont need them calling the cops if I happen to take a wizz off my deck they have every right to if I do so on their deck though :rolleyes:
     
  8. Horselover

    Horselover Joyce

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    Here in our area where it is becoming increasingly more developed--I get a little angry about these people who just love the country life. They think they have two acres and a big house and are in a development and they are in the country. Just love it here. Then, they want police protection, garbage collection, lights etc and run everything they can.

    You are in a rural lifestyle in my book if you have a few acres, have maybe a vegetable garden or herb garden, have some chickens or whatever, goats, a horse and enjoy outdoor activities with your family. Then you are in a rural lifestyle. ( I don't mean all the animals I mentioned--just my idea though)

    I love country life. I love walking out my door and going whereever I want on ,my property.

    Just my two cents worth--hope I did not get off the subject.
     
  9. hoofinitnorth

    hoofinitnorth Well-Known Member

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    I like the now famous story about the city folks that kept migrating out to the country because they liked the farm setting but then when they moved in they all complained of the smell of horse/cow manure and the early hours the farmers kept next door! There's something about that story where the local govt. agencies involved with planning & development or something or other created a "Scratch & Sniff" brochure with the smell of manure billed as the REAL smell of the country. ;)
     
  10. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It means that when I get up in the morning and the bathroom is full........................I go outside
     
  11. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    That is about rual life is around here. :(

    Sadly achiving rual life is tougher and tougher, show me a DIRT road, heck show me a gravel road! The country already has "city" water, the internet, a city folk can still live like a city folk.

    When you live in the country, you can breathe and somtimes you will get fresh air, somtimes you would get the stinch of a hog lagoon. :p

    ...and when you see the "new neighbors" purchase 80 acres and within three years they got a log cabin, a two acer lake, a long drive and all sorts of machinery.....and they have three security lights around the house. :rolleyes:
     
  12. Helena

    Helena Well-Known Member

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    Our county is now going through a "zoning" plan. It had to come sooner or later I suppose. They came and explained it all to our township meeting the other week. I can see the good and bad of both sides but for us we will get to decide what we want to be zoned. Farm, commerical, residential. I would think our little bit of heaven will stay with the farm zoning. And also it will be written somewhere that if you buy in a certain "zone" and you smell and see the farm life...you can't complain about it after you buy !! I man that also had acres of land up on the mountain stated he had bought the land to eventually build a couple of homes there. If it goes farm land or whatever they call it he will not because of the septic water etc considerations. I understand that. We don't own the land we pay our mortgages on...?? With that land getting built on more and more we have to think ahead .. Are they zoned for anything there ?? Also, it was also mentioned that ...we don't own the view...That's right but I'll tell you this..when you go to sell or better yet buy a place if you have one heck of a glorious view..as we are lucky to have..the real estate agent loves to play that up when showing the house. The world seems to be getting smaller and they stopped making land..?? :rolleyes:
     
  13. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Our county in the country is still zone free, no house inspections, etc. minimal 911, IT'S GREAT.

    The thing I really miss about the country is the ability to get LOST, we can't do that anymore, GPS, 911 road signs with the cute names, it is really cool just going for a drive thru the country, and not know wear your going! :)
     
  14. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    We had the perfect place at our last house, until the 10 acres next to us sold (we couldn't afford that too). Then the buyer build a house, real close to our property line instead of further back on their property - but that was their right. Sigh.

    Then the neighbors on the other side of us (perfect neighbors) were transferred to Chicago by their jobs and they sold that house. The buyers moved in and brought all their junk, which they decided was best situated next to our property line... so we could keep an eye on it. Sigh.

    The old farmer across the road died and his kids were wanting $money$ so we knew the beautiful view we currently had of the city was about to disappear if anyone built there - a good likelihood.

    The last straw was the neighbors with the 10 acres decided to allow a local company film a movie on their property. Now every weekend, our serene country home was innundated with hundreds of people swarming around. No more going out in the early mornings for prayer and contemplation in total peace. No more nice view of the city because hundreds of cars were lined up along the country road on both sides. Trash littering the land... it turned a beautiful life into a miserable summer and fall. It even made me feel uncomfortable to go out onto our back patio or back yard, since there were people everywhere within earshot, leaning on our fence.

    Our neighbors didn't ask if this was ok - and they didn't have to - it was their land. We were smart enough to know this. They were also talking about building 3 more houses on their property for their kids. Sigh.

    I realized the beautiful country place had changed and was becoming a lot like the city. Then the city started to try and involuntarily annex us in. They came right out and announced our taxes would go up about 2 1/2 times what it was and we'd have to abide by all their rules. That was the last straw. We decided it was time to move further away from the city and buy enough land that we could have a house in the middle of it and no matter what others were doing around us, it wouldn't affect us.

    We were lucky to find 40 acres with a house built right in the middle, with the property lines surrounded by heavy timberland. Awww the serenity! We have been fortunate to have good neighbors all around us, but 2 families are moving away, so who knows what that will bring. An elderly neighbor who farms out here and whose land adjoins ours, just died so we don't know what will happen with their land, but we've let the family know we'd be interested in the adjoining land. Our pastor bought the land on the other side of us for hunting purposes and has promised if he ever sells, we'd get first option. We already purchased the 80 acres adjoining the north side of our property, so no one can encroach from that direction.

    Some company could come in and offer neighbors a great deal of money for their land, and put up commercial hog lots - and there's probably nothing we could do about it but complain.

    I don't blame that guy for buying 600 acres - if I could afford it, I'd do that too. And I might even build a few homes around it to ensure I got to pick who my neighbors were, but... there's still no guarantees.

    I guess to me - the perfect rural lifestyle is to find a place in the country unaffected by city ordinances, rules, regulations, where I can raise the animals I want, grow the crops I want, my neighbors can do the same - and neither of us would intrude on each other's lives in a negative manner.

    Dream on. :)
     
  15. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Until you realize that we need to get along with our neighbors regardless of our differences you will never really understand rural culture (and certainly not be a part of it). Thats the difference, tolerence, not homogenity.
     
  16. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    LOL...so my neighbors who are complaining because they don't think the property being sold will be rural, would be breaking one of the rural 'rules' by complaining about what their neighbor was doing with his property! :p
     
  17. shellyr44

    shellyr44 Well-Known Member

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    We live three miles from the nearest village, yet we are very rural out here. We still have lots of big farms in the neighborhood and lots of little hobby farms popping up everywhere. When I started raising chickens almost four years ago, I was the only one on my road. Now there are three other families raising chickens, two goat farms and two sheep farms. My husband and I own a few acreas and have a garden and green house to grow a lot of our own food. We have good neighbors but are not crowded. Fields separate all of us. As for that mountain top development, that is very sad. Where will the wild life go?
     
  18. chris30523

    chris30523 Well-Known Member

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    Thats a good idea but our planning and development government agencies are the ones getting rich on luring the wealthy city folks out to the country.I have had complaints from my neighbors about the smell of chickens.They built a million dollar home on my doorstep (I informed them before they bought that I had chickens).They liked the look of my horses and goats grazing in the pastures??Go figure??Wait till they get loose and destroy their expensive landscaping..(hopefully that won't happen)
    Rural to me is an area where farming and large tracts of land are the norm..Not so crowded..What my area used to be..We are within an hour of a large city so now rural is where the wealthy surbabanites come to build their big homes and commute to the city...
     
  19. roadless

    roadless Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We built a home on the edge of town in the country 20 years ago. Since then 42!!! homes have been built on our short (one mile) road. My property taxes went way up and my privacy went way down....its not rural anymore to my way of thinking. That is why I love going to our new (to us) offgrid cabin, 53 beautiful acres...now that is rural!
     
  20. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Ah, but farming is defined as agricultural, not rural, living. I am attempting to live an agricultural lifestyle in a rural setting; we're not zoned for agriculture here.