What do you think about buying this Jersey?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by FlipFlopFarmer, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    The lady that we are buying milk from gave me the contact info for a small dairy near me (which is where she bought her cow). I called to see if they had any weaned heifers or older cows that they are wanting to get rid of.

    It turns out that their daughter raised a cow for FFA and is ready to sell it. She was part of the commercial herd but was more of a "pet" than any of the others. She is a registered jersey with a complete medical history. She calved about 3 months ago.

    Here's the catch - she's 10. They haven't bred her back because they were thinking they were going to sell her and wanted to see what the situation was going to be prior to AI'ing her.
    They are willing to AI her before selling at no addt'l cost.

    The want $300 for her.

    Two concerns come to mind:
    1) Her age and the fact that she is not currently bred.

    2) The fact that she has only been milked by machine.

    What do you all think about this one? I am going to see her tomorrow.
     
  2. SHELBY

    SHELBY Well-Known Member

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    If it were me I would snatch her up in a heart beat.. :D ..She may be 10 but you are not going to find a milking cow for $300.00 without some age on her...At least around here anyway. She may have only been milked by machine but being a "pet" it may be to your advantage and she should have no problem being hand milked if you know what you are doing...Also another point for her is you know what she has had from the medical history... Just my opinion....
     

  3. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    I've never milked a cow before :eek: This worries me as she has probably never been hand milked before. We'd both be new to this. :)

    The complete medical history is a HUGE plus and the fact that the dairy is so close to me - I can always call with questions.

    Other people have indicated that she would probably bring more money if they sold her for hamburger than selling her to me. As this was their daughter's cow, they are really concerned about finding her a good home rather than the money.

    Carla
     
  4. cowman

    cowman Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a fairly good deal to me. The price is about right for a slaughter cow. Probably bring about 35 cents at auction depending on how big and fat she is. It is just now time to breed her back. I would go with an Angus bull. Even if she has been milked by machine that will be no problem because she is used to being washed and hooked up to the machine. I doubt if she will care at all.
     
  5. Carol K

    Carol K Well-Known Member

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    Carla, go get her NOW!!

    She will be great to learn with, she has the experience and will probably be patient. You have the dairy close by to call if you need help, and to use to get her bred. She sounds like a steal, tell them you will buy her but want her AI'd and you want them to show you how to hand milk her!
    If it's any help, I'd never milked either, and learnt on my cow, everyone has to learn sometime-go for it.

    Carol K
     
  6. I had a cow that I kept as a pet after my parents sold their dairy farm and she lived to be 15. She would have lived much longer, but she had complications from calving and we had the vet euthanize her. (It's a long story and I don't have time for it now). Her age had nothing to do with the calving problems. We have raiser her daughter and plan on breeding her this year. I wouldn't let the age of the Jersey cow stop you from buying her, with proper care cows can lead productive lives to 20 or older.
    Most older cows tend to be a little more mellow than younger cows and adapt quickly to changes in milking. Hand milking shouldn't be a problem even if she has been milked by machines her whole life.
    If the current owners are willing to AI her free of charge I think you're getting a great deal. Bull calves alone cost between $50 and $100 in my area and heifer calves go for $150-500 depending on the breed.
    Good luck if you decide to take this cow. At the very least she'll be a great learning experience.
     
  7. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    I agree that it sounds like a good deal!

    My cow had always been machine milked, and adjusted to hand milking with no problem. If she's in milk right now, you can always ask to try her out, and see how cooperative she is. The farmer can teach you how to hand milk at the same time. They sound like nice people, I'm sure they will be willing to help you out ...

    As far as her age, odds are 50-50 that her next calf will be a heifer. With any luck, you can replace her with her daughter in a couple years.

    Even if she doesn't give a whole lot of milk, even a gallon a day is probably as much or more than most people need for household use. Right?!
     
  8. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the input and the inspiration. I guess there's always a first for everything and everyone. :)

    I know the lifespan of a cow can be fairly high but what's the average age (provided they are healthy) that they can be bred to? I've heard of 18 y/o cows that are preggers and doing well. Is this normal or a rare?

    Her age did concern me a little at first but the more I think about it the more it's probably a benefit. She's very well trained. Atleast one of us would know what's going on and it'll probably be her!!! :D

    When you purchase a registered cow, what's the process? Do you as the buyer get all of their paperwork including medical history info at the time of purchase? I assume I would need to fill out paperwork to change the registration to my me. Anyone out there know the approx cost for registration? If she had a heifer we would keep her for a replacement and a steer we would raise for meat. Just wondering if it's really worth it to keep her registered. I guess if she had more than one heifer we would want to sell her.


    Carla :)
     
  9. Suzanne

    Suzanne Well-Known Member

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    Run don't walk to get her....they should fill out the paperwork and send it in. It is just a change in ownership if she is already registered. She is worth keeping records on. We also bought a cow, she was 3 at the time, only use to a milking machine. She is now 13 and still my favorite all time addition to the farm. Her teats were alittle small but that has changed. She has more then paid for herself, as we sell the registered heifer calves to the 4-H people for top dollar. But now have been keeping them, breeding them and selling them springing. We raise and butcher the steers. We also have her daughter, which is fresh now, she is 4. I really like the older cows, they do have better heads, not so crazy. We also have 3 other heifers from the 2 cows now, 2 yearlings, and a 3 month old, they are a delight. Jerseys are known for throwing more heifer calves, our reconds sure show that over the years.
    Also my vet told me he knows a man who has a 24 year old cow......I don't know what kind though......
     
  10. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    NO, NO, NO, don't, under any circumstances, buy that cow..... just send me the name and phone number of the sellers. Seriously, sounds like a can't lose deal to me. Since she came from a dairy she probably has very good genetics, and has been well cared for. If she is in good health she should be good for several more calves and you could raise a replacement cow. As a general rule Jerseys are some of the most laid back, gentle, and personable cows to be found, an ideal first time choice.
     
  11. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Ha Ha very funny! Too late! I'm already buying her =) We're very excited!
     
  12. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Yayy! I am happy for you. :D
     
  13. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    I know I'm posting a little late to this thread but I was just quoted $1000 for a 10 year old dexter that isn't pregnant ! He told me that he had had other dexter cows that lived to be around 19 and having calves until the end.

    Mel-
     
  14. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    So did you get her? How's it working out? :)
     
  15. Bullrunner

    Bullrunner Member

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    Wish I had seen this sooner. Please let us know what happens. At ten she is a small gamble. Not being bred back concerns me but I would take the risk. If you don't know how to milk her by hand please get help. She shouldn't be any problem, just give her a little time to get adjusted to you and her new evvironment. I have to disagree about breeding her back to an Angus. If she throws a heifer you could really take a step backward. Also don't worry about milk quantity in the genetics when picking out a bull, if your milking by hand it could be more than you want. Chose for good legs and udder especially udder support. Good luck with her. She could have a few good years left. If you have any questions about the AI let me know. I worked in the field for many years and have a lot of respect for it. Driving around with semen tanks in the back of my truck for all those years is why I have my screen name- Bullrunner. God Bless
     
  16. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    I did buy the cow. She's wonderful - very well mannered. Her name is Teensie. She was given lutalyse (not sure if I'm spelling that right?) and AI'd on 4/24 to a registered jersey. I don't think she took though. although I'm not certain yet. I've never owned a cow before but the signs indicate that she's in heat. She's been bellowing, a little more restless, milk production is down a little and at last nights milking, my husband and I noticed a clear string of mucus coming from her backside. No blood or anything but we're keeping an eye out.

    She was giving just under 5 gallons at the dairy being machine milked. The first two days we had her, she only gave about 1 - 1/2 gallons per milking but keep in mind she was used to being machine milked and we're not very good milkers yet. Anyway - We got her on Friday the 17th and by Tuesday or Wednesday we were feeling pretty good to be getting about 4 Gallons a day. Now since then she's been declining in production by about a quarter gallon at each milking. Our pasture isn't that great as it needs to be mowed off (broken tractor :waa: ) so we added alfalfa and increased her grain a little.

    So - I know I can call the dairy to see about getting her AI'd again $$$$ More money though $$$$ which stinks due to all of the start up costs associated with her.

    Bullrunner - know a AI tech in Oregon? :)

    Any thoughts on the decline in milk production? We're keeping a close eye on her. Temp is normal although she's acting a little tired or depressed or something.

    :) Carla
     
  17. sunnymeadows

    sunnymeadows New Member

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    [Hey- I know I am jumping in but I read your posts and think you have a great bargain in your cow. I have a jersey that AI'd to an angus last year and she gave me a beautiful little heifer. Rats! She was not worth very much- at least not as much as a purebred jersey,.
    Your Teensie sounds like she is in heat right now. My cow has a very small window of time for standing heat. I hope you don't miss hers (your cow's). Her milk production will drop and she will even get sassy and (in my cow's case, very PMS-ey) when in heat. I have to keep a loop on Buttercup's back leg AND tie up her middle to keep her from busting my arm when she is in heat.
    Your cow sounds like a dream. Enjoy!
     
  18. Hey if you're still around, do you mind sharing the name and location of the dairy you got your cow from?

    I'm just north of Vancouver, WA; looking for a second jersey....

    Thanks!
    anita
    spark@deecreekfarm.com
     
  19. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The change in diet and general disruption in her life could account for her drop in production, you don't need 35 gallons of milk a week anyway....lol
     
  20. FlipFlopFarmer

    FlipFlopFarmer Well-Known Member

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    I bought my jersey from Fallen Oak Jerseys in Molalla, OR. You can find them on jerseydirectory.com choosing Oregon as the state. They are such wonderful people. :D I spent atleast 2 -3 hours talking with them and looking around their dairy. I am very pleased with my cow. She's healthy, gentle and has been well taken care of. She's a little older and my thought was to breed her for a replacement - now that I have her, I can't even imagine starting all over with a heifer!

    Feel free to contact me if you need help finding Fallen Oak Jerseys on the web.

    :)
    Carla