What Do You Feed?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by 6e, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    We're picking up some more pigs and now it's starting to get expensive and so I was wondering, what do you feed your pigs? How much does it cost? Do you free feed or limit feed? What is the most economical way to feed pigs?
     
  2. bricned

    bricned Well-Known Member

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    We buy bulk corn { 55 gal barrels} from a local farmer. This cost app.seven
    dollars a hundred. We feed this along with a soy bean meal supplement,vitmans
    and minerals. The corn is always soaked for at lest 48 hrs. The soy bean meal
    is added in different amount to get the desired protien level for the type of
    pigs being fed. This system has produced the best results at the lowest cost
    in the long run.
     

  3. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

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    Hello,

    I bought an order of bulk pig feed, mixed at the local feed store to my order. One ton cost me $239.00 I also feed that to my meat chickens.

    As a supplemental feed, I pick up the overripe produce from a local farm stand. I generally get two to three full wheelbarrows each day, of tomatoes, melons, squash, cucumbers, sweet peppers, sweet corn. I offer about a half wheelbarrow to my two pigs each day. Some days they eat it all, some days not. And they are fed grain (two huge shovelfuls twice a day). Not much science to it, and my pigs are thriving and growing like crazy!

    I also feed excess eggs. Generally 6-12 a day; shells and all.
     
  4. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    Last time I fed some out I did it with the bags of commercial pellets - Hello! Very expensive!

    Now I have access to free spent grain and am feeding spent grain, corn, hay, weeds, and kitchen and garden scraps, with a bit of DE too. They eat pretty much whatever and they are thriving!

    I free feed my butcher hogs. Grow quicker that way.

    kids
     
  5. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    mostly commercial feed (yeah, $$$) but they have had lots of goat milk (when we had alot--sigh--its breeding time so things are trickling along now), eggs, alfalfa, grass hay, table scraps, soaked corn, garden left-overs--you name it and they eat it!

    I wish:

    1. I had gotten pigs in March through May when we had mucho milk
    2. we had some source of more free produce.

    Vanessa
     
  6. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    I have a question, why do you soak the corn?
     
  7. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    We're just starting out... what we've done so far.
    We have some commercial hog feed, 16% protein, that we pay about $6 a 50 lb. bag. They also get about 2 - 3 gallons of goat milk a day (between 3 pigs), and leftovers, past-ripe produce, etc. We have a chance to get a couple of hundred pounds of potatoes, so we may use that too. Not sure if we need to cook them or not?
     
  8. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    I don't think you have to cook them as I've heard of people that pasture their pigs and actually plant potatoes for the pigs to find.
     
  9. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    I feed anything I can get my hands on. I get slop from local restaurants, old oil from deep fryers, apple peelings from local orchards, lots of fresh pasture and hay, and the odd bucket of corn when I have nothing else to feed and the pigs have had a day to clean up the pasture. This is what I produce.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    for digestibility.

    Vanessa
    near Nashville
     
  11. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Our pigs get all of our waste milk from the dairy. Then it depends on what we have. My MIL cooks at a restaurant and brings home fresh scraps pretty regular. When we have no scraps to feed them they get corn along with their milk. Then they always have access to greens or hay depending on what time of year it is. We had some leftover (non treated) seed oats and found out our pigs really like those.

    Heather
     
  12. Jamaican stead

    Jamaican stead New Member

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    cassava root chunks, water hyacinths, and some corn.
     
  13. Argent Farms

    Argent Farms Pig farmer

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    Hey kidsngarden, glad to hear the spent grain is working out for you.

    My hogs get spent grain and cracked corn as well, I used to supplement that with a cup or 2 of soy meal, but haven't bothered to in a while. Right now they are getting a bunch of apples and pears and grapes from our orchard as well.
     
  14. PlowGirl

    PlowGirl Well-Known Member

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    I buy bulk cracked corn by the ton, and mix it with soybean oil and soy meal. Fed free choice. The pigs are also on small paddocks that are rotated after they've been thoroughly rooted up, so they have access to roots, nuts, etc and room to exercise. BTW, I have somewhere in the vicinity of 60ish head. Breeding boars/sows, first parity gilts and weaners, feeders, and butchers. I buy ALOT of cracked corn. lol

    I very rarely have kitchen scraps, but give them what I can scrounge. They think it's a treat to eat MY garbage.
     
  15. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    Plowgirl: With that many head, do you find that you make any money off of them? I'm curious because they cost so much to feed that I wonder if you ever get that back out of them to make a profit. While I'm on the subject, what is the best way, meaning, how big are the pigs you sell and how much do you sell them for to make a profit?
     
  16. PlowGirl

    PlowGirl Well-Known Member

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    It is possible to turn a profit. There are a number of different markets available, and now with agri-terrorism being spotlighted in the national media, that provides a new angle to another niche.

    I can sell as weanlings. What doesn't sell as a weanling, gets a few more pounds, and sells as a feeder. What doesn't sell as a feeder, can be sold as breeding stock, (if quality) or finished out to butcher.

    When selling to a consumer, there are the usual variety of options. Half, whole, quarters. Then there's BBQ, luau, Ren Faire. In addition, the ethnic market is another viable alternative. Thus, I keep a lot of irons in the fire, trying not to burn myself. lol It's a lot of work, but a lot of fun as well.

    What I don't do, is sell at the livestock barn. The prices that most of those pigs go for is pathetic. OTOH, my ideal consumer very likely will never frequent a sale barn. This consumer cares how is food is raised, wants to put a face to the farmer, is concerned about the animal's welfare and feeding, cares about the quality and purity of the food they eat. I also provide transportation of the hog to the processor's, so that the consumer has only to deal with picking up the butchered cuts.

    All of the above, is the long way of saying, it can be done.
     
  17. PlowGirl

    PlowGirl Well-Known Member

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    I neglected to tell you how I price them.

    Purebred/crossbred weanlings are $40.
    Breeding quality weanlings $75/gilts $50/boars

    Feeders $60
    Bred gilts $150 to $200

    Finished hogs: includes transport, but not processing. I don't market my finished hogs until close to or over 300#s, unless the buyer just wants one smaller.
    $300/whole
    $175/half

    BBQ pigs are priced according to age^
     
  18. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    That is very interesting and I want to thank you and all of you for your information.
    I'm sorry, but I have one more question Plowgirl. If you take a pig into be processed for someone and they don't pick it up, are you stuck with the meat plus the processing fee? If they only want half a pig, how do you work out the processing fee?
     
  19. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    We use a mix for all of our animals, cracked corn, soybean meal and oats. We have it mixed and buy it by the ton. It's fed to our chickens, ducks, guineas, horses, sheep, and pigs.. Each animal then gets added nutrients, scraps, etc. depending on the animal.
    The feed costs around $8.00 per 100 lbs.. It changes but has never been over $9.00.
    You might check with your county AG agent, he should be able to recommend a recipe AND let you know what is readily available in your area.
    Good luck! :)
     
  20. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Not plowgirl, but I can tell you how we will avoid this. No animal gets killed until I have the money in hand. If the buyer then doesn't show up, I'd only be out the butchering fee and I still have the meat.