What do you do to milk after it comes out of the cow?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Laura Workman, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Stonefly 71 asked in another thread:

    You strain it, chill it quickly and put it in the fridge. Depending on how good a job you do, it can keep up to two weeks in the fridge, but we prefer to drink it within a few days, mostly because with milk coming in every day, there's no reason not to drink the freshest milk. We make cheese with the rest or feed it to the pigs.
     
  2. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    What would you strain it with, cheesecloth? And is their some method of chilling it quickly other than the freezer?
     

  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    For straining, I use milk filters, purchases in boxes of one hundred at the feed store. I have a strainer that they fit in -- you can find one at one of the goat supply houses, or Nasco livestock catalog. Probably some others, too, but those are the ones I know about. The strainer fits on top of a jar and you pour the milk through.

    I don't chill all of my milk. Some goes straight into kefir. But the rest goes into the refrigerator. If I didn't have a frig, I would work out some other way to cool the milk quickly. Perhaps a spring house, or something like that. Even just a bucket of cold water would help. But for quality milk, you really need to cool the milk as much and as quickly as possible.

    Kathleen
     
  4. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I used one of the gold coffee filters to filter my milk. I put what I wanted to pasturize warm from the cow straight into the pasturizer. The rest went in the fridg marked which bottles were raw and which were pasturized. I used the raw to make cheese or yogurt. I won't get into the pasturization debate other than to say that it lasts longer pasturized.
     
  5. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've known some people who put a ziplock baggie or a small tupperware type bowl filled with water and frozen into the bottom of the cbucket. Then as the milk hits the bucket it's chilled automatically. From what I hear, it works out well. The milk still has to be strainned and refridgerated, but it takes out some of the haste in getting it back to the kitchen and in the refridgerator.
     
  6. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I use 6 1/2 in KenAg milk filters but no special strainer- I just fold them to fit in the canning funnel and pour the milk through that into quart jars. I've tried coffee filters but they are so much slower than milk filters. Also, I notice there's often some sludge in the coffee pot that those filters let through- I don't want that in the milk!

    There's also a big feed component in quality milk. A cow or goat fed really good, nutritious hay makes more butterfat than the same animal fed so-so hay and good grain. And, having goats, I've learned that what they eat will come out in the milk. I can usually tell when they're eating something odd-
    Pea hay = old, big, tough pea flavored milk
    white sage = cough syrup flavored milk
    cabbage = milk that smells like the old sock at the bottom of a clothes hamper
    Yum!
     
  7. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I strain my milk through a milk filter purchased from a goat supply house, directly into a very, very clean canning jar. Then I immediately plunge the canning jar neck deep into a bucket of ice water, with plenty of ice still in it to cool the water as the milk gives off heat. I do all this in the milking room, by the way, not in the kitchen. I don't want to wait long enough to get to the kitchen.