What do you all think?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by dunroven, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We had a gentleman approach us regarding buying rabbit manure. He wants it by the pickup load. In doing some research on the net, I can't for sure come up with a really good price. Hubby decided $25 for a pickup load. What do you think of this?
     
  2. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    $25.00 a pickup load doesn't sound too bad. Who does the shoveling? :p

    We had neighbors ask us for rabbit manure, and we just let them take it away. They came back later on that summer with green beans, tomatoes, home made wine. What a swap, eh?

    NeHi Mama
     

  3. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Excellent trade! The gentleman that asked me this is a grower of giant pumpkins. Actually I don't really want a giant pumpkin........LOL :eek:
     
  4. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    Here we were told $20.00 a small pick up load and we do the shoveling. I now have all I need with my own rabbits.
     
  5. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are you talking a normal size pickup truck box? You're selling a ready made, easy to handle fertilizer/soil conditioner and $25 sounds pretty low to me. What's the guy going to use it for, do you know? If he wants a lot of it, I'd certainly give him a good price, but I'd set a per 100# price and do it that way. Maybe $5 a cwt.? And he does the shoveling or else you use a tractor bucket.

    Jennifer
     
  6. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, the gentleman has not contacted me back, but he grows giant pumpkins. I am talking a standard pickup, and he would have to shovel it for himself. We have no tractor. My husband has been power washing the rabbit house through the summer months and when it gets outside the building, he has been shoveling it into a wheelbarrow and dumping on our garden. We told the gentleman that we wouldn't have enough for a pickup load now until spring, since all we had is on our garden. We do have 90 rabbits, so we will be building up quite a bit in a short time, although that still isn't a lot. We have several litters on the way, and are going to raise some of those for meat for ourselves and to sell, but I'm not sure we would have a pickup load very often, guess we'll just have to wait and see. I kind of like the idea, and hubby does too, of getting 5 gallon buckets, put a plastic bag in them, scoop it in and sell those for $5 each, with a $2 deposit on the bucket. Want more manure? Bring back the bucket and we'll load you up for $5, or your own bucket for $5. That's how we used to buy slip when we did ceramics and you had to bring the bucket back, or it was yours for $2 (which most people bring them back since they aren't that expensive to buy).

    Anyway, I'm kind of anxious to see if we can make some sales with this. Sounds like a pretty easy way to turn a buck, since we already have it coming anyway!
     
  7. Rachel K.

    Rachel K. Well-Known Member

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    So you can actually make money off of manure? I have a large Goat stall that is going to be needing cleaning out this spring. Two Goats currently living in it. Poop, Straw, Hay, its all in there. I don't know what I will be doing with all of the waste... I think that it would be great if I could make some money off of it. I need to clean it out anyway so the Shoveling and cleaning isn't a problem. I also have Rabbit manure that I could add to it and even Chicken manure. I otherwise would just be dumping it somewhere on our land.

    How do you go about selling Manure? Ads in the feed stores?
     
  8. Tucker

    Tucker Well-Known Member

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    What me n hubby ,,, "well actually hub does most of the shovel work" ,,, do is ,, we created a big compost area ,,,

    since the straw and hay takes a lot longer to rot well ,, unless we spread out on the beds and till in imediately ,, we will pile everything in one place and let mother nature take its course ,,

    if you have a place ,, I would go ahead and clean out the goat stall now ,, rabbit area and the chicken area ,, pile it all together and let it 'cook' ... :)

    once its all composted ,, next spring you could advertise at local stores where they sell transplants at n such ,, that you have composted manure for adding to anyones garden ,,

    the one bad thing about adding the poop n 'stuff' 'straight' is the hay and straw sprouts ,, unless its well rotted ,, you will have to either till a few times to kill the stuff that sprouts or 'know' that you'll have weeding to do ,,
     
  9. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

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    Our manure business is quite profitable.

    Our manure is loaded onto a trailer as it comes from the barn. We
    have two trailers that we use depending upon the size of the order.
    One trailer is 16 ft. long and has 18" high sideboards. We have someone
    who buys all those. All we do is deliver it 35 miles and they unload
    it. We have a smaller one for delivery to local gardeners. It is
    4' x 8' with 12" high sideboards. It is delivered and unloaded for $85.00.

    I do sell bags IF people call me and make arrangements in advance.
    Because rabbits are a business for me, I don't like people dropping
    in to my farm unannounced. Nor are people allowed to load the
    manure. We do not allow visitors inside the barn area.

    We don't routinely feed hay so the manure is quite clean. Any that
    falls from the nests is easily raked from the manure.

    It seems the price of the product would be determined by the law of
    supply and demand. $25 for a 1/2 ton pickup load is
    quite common across the country. Prices rise for larger trucks.

    **************************************
    Linda Welch
    http://www.texasrabbitconnection.com
    http://www.texasrabbitconnection.com/forums/
     
  10. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We also don't allow anyone in where our rabbits are, but when hubby washes out the barns, everything runs out to a wall on the south half of the building. Our rabbits are housed in what was going to be a hog confinement building, has 8 bays in it and we have hung cages in 3 of those bays right now and are getting ready for a fourth. Anyway, the south side is open; however, it is covered with corrugated tin in the winter, and we have chain link panels across it in the summer. The whole building slants to the south with a concrete wall about 40 feet from the entrance to the rabbit house. Anyway, he power washes from the north to the south, so the manure goes down against the concrete wall and stays there until he loads it into the wheelbarrows and moves it to wherever he wants it, so it would not be a bad thing for someone to back the pickup up to the cement pad and just scoop it in.