What do you all think about this?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by QBVII, Apr 26, 2006.

  1. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty close to what I have in mind. I want a woodlot, though, and I want to sell goat milk rather than bread. But I think they are on the right track.

    Kathleen
     

  3. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    I agree.
    The only thing I would change....before I gave up work I would probably get the money to build a larger cabin.
    I would also probably want electric...I have to have internet....
     
  4. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    Can easily do the internet with solar/battery/laptop! :)
     
  5. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    I made a concious choice years ago to need less so I would be able to enjoy the lifestyle I wanted. It was not as hard as one might think. I am probanbly no different than many of you. But folks are shocked to hear things like- I only own one pair of casual shoes. I do have muck boots and sandles but that's it. I will not buy another pair till the ones I am wearing fall apert. The same goes for clothes and cars and everything. I live comfortably on less than $10,000 a yr. That's myself and two teenagers. I do have a rent free situation.
    I think most people get into a rut thinking that one must'go to work' just because it is what you are supposed to do. If everyone would lokk deep into themselves they would find the thing that they love to do. For some it is teaching for some it is animals for some it might even be cleaning houses. Whatever it is that is your special gift or talent. that is what you will be the best at. Once you find it create a way to live off it . I have and It creates a fufillment that you can not find anywhere.
    Steff
     
  6. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    That's a thought.
    Except we use a lot of hard drive space that would probably require a PC.
    And our 'puter is pretty much on 24/7....hubby says that would use a ton of batteries! LOL
     
  7. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    Steff, I do agree..I think people these days think they "have to have" X amount of money to live on.

    That's why I liked what this couple (in the original post) did.
     
  8. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    That is super, they found something unique to support their lifestyle. All I keep thinking it, they must not have health insurance. They would need at least two or three times more money every month if they did carry it.
     
  9. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    No, they don't have health insurance. But a lot of regular working people don't, either.

    What they did is make an "emergency stash" of $1,000 that they keep for emergency medical bills.
     
  10. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There's only one thing I don't like about this, and it's a big dislike: If you are selling bread for $4.50 a loaf, you're selling to the rich people. You can't do it unless the wealthy folks are there to sell to. It's not that I dislike rich people, but I dislike having to cater to their needs for a luxury. You know it's a luxury because that person who makes $40,000 a year isn't going to buy this bread, they might make it themselves, but they aren't going to fork over that kind of money on a regular basis.

    I'm probably living in the wrong century.

    Jennifer
     
  11. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Thinking Small (and Simple) is a key to freedom from obligation.

    More space requires more money to acquire and more effort to maintain and heat -- and fill with "stuff". A large family may require space (to maintain sanity), but two people should be able to live happily in limited space used efficiency.

    “Stuff” can be stored in outbuildings that are far more economical to construct than housing. A garage is very expensive junk storage area or “protection” for vehicles that need no protection (except cosmetically perhaps).

    Our trailer is a model of space efficiency, particularly after we made a few modifications. In less than 300 square feet inside (32' x 8' with 16' x 4' slide-out) we are perfectly comfortable. That amount of square footage is the same as a building 17’ x 17’. Many people “require” a bedroom larger than that, and typically must have a job to heat, cool, maintain and pay mortgage and taxes on their spacious abode.

    Part of our comfort is that we truly enjoy each other’s company and we don’t need “sulking space”. Also, we naturally prefer outside activities and an active life. Perhaps more sedentary people would need greater inside space to be comfortable???? (and those who don’t get along may need separate residences).

    If we ever decide to build a modest home or cabin (we’ve come close a couple times) our objective will be to build as much comfort as possible into as small a space as possible – probably less than 600 square feet (24’ x 24’). We will, of course, incorporate many space-efficient ideas from the trailer but will provide for wood heat and a bit more food storage area.

    To evaluate space efficiency, look at any RV – or look at ours if you will be at the Buffalo River gathering.
     
  12. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it would be rich people who would be buying their bread.
    It's probably just "normal", middle-class people who like good bread.
    Really rich people live in gated communities.

    Besides, I wouldn't care who bought my bread --- just that someone DID.
     
  13. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    LOL....yes, just having storage for your "stuff" makes a lot of sense.
    I also saw these little cabins online --- they're constructed of wood and you can get all the upgrades you want; you only put $250 down to get it delivered.
    People could theoretically start off in one of those things to keep costs down and add onto it. You could always order one and add your own insulation, drywall, wiring....or whatever else.
    Knock out a wall and add on; or add a screened-in porch.
    The hubby and I would do very well with something like that.
    Like you all, we don't require "sulking space."
    :p
    We have the two children with us, though....but the cogs are turning!
     
  14. nogreaterjoy8

    nogreaterjoy8 Well-Known Member

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    We have friends who lived non-electric for a few years. He somehow rigged up car batteries to his computer, then he would just change out the car battery and let the alternator charge it. I have no idea what he used (transformer, converter??) but it can be done. DH isn't here or I'd ask him.

    They had 3 or 4 car batteries - one ran lights in their kitchen, one ran the computer, etc. The only thing they ever complained about was having to switch out the battery in the car.
     
  15. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    I read about them in HST or was it MEN? Anyway, they don't have children depending on them. So for those of us that do, I think the terms would be a bit different. IE:

    Bigger house
    Bigger land
    Production of more food
    More than one commodity to sell

    Kids need clothing a lot more often than do adults that are not growing any longer, they need education, there is a need for transportation( and we all know how expensive that is getting).
    I would wounder how much this couple has had to go up on the price of their bread to cover the vast increase of gas to deliver the bread.
    I guess this is just one more reason to consider a community. Much of the needs would be closer at hand and many people working together to produce different items will serve more people than if you tried doing it all yourself.
    (sorry to revert back to the community topic, it is just so thick on my mind.)
     
  16. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    I think that part of their success lies in where they are.."thirty-five miles away from the city". City people will pay $4.50 for a loaf of home-made bread..they are accustomed to paying more than that for a cup of coffee and a donut. That's well within commuting distance..so people who work in the city, make the good money but live in the outlying areas make very good customers for folks who sell bread, honey, eggs, crafts, farm-stand produce, etc.

    It's not quite the same as trying to do this farther out in the country where there are more folks who are accustomed to making their own bread, have bee hives, etc..you get the picture. Not to say that it cannot be done, but it's a much smaller customer base and you'd have to be selling something that is fairly unique to that area..e.g. be the ONLY goat dairy around..or have the ONLY portable saw mill in the area.

    If I did this right now where I am, I'd end up feeding that bread to the wild birds..but if I bought land 50 miles North of here and marketed to St. Louis commuters, chances are I'd do pretty well..yet then I'd be faced with paying quite a bit of land taxes on those 2 1/2 acres..
    Great idea IMHO..all depends upon if you want to be that close to a city.
    35 miles isn't that far away...OR... if whatever you do is unique enough to allow you to have enough buyers in a more rural area.
     
  17. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    I don't think they deliver it --- they just sell it to people nearby.

    Yes, I would have to have a larger home because of our children.

    Don't apologize for referring back to the community. It doesn't bother me....it might bother Boleyz, though!
    BWAHAHAHA

    Actually, YES, this is *yet another reason* to consider community living. I totally agree. What with the "extreme commuting* and gas prices, I can't think of better reasons!
     
  18. simplegirl

    simplegirl Well-Known Member

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    I agree- there are lots of people out there who still have no clue. I think that even people around here would give that if the bread was really good. Sad but true... I wouldn't, because I am willing to make my own if I need it.
     
  19. peacebaker

    peacebaker Well-Known Member

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    I know what you mean. I started baking bread because I wanted the $4.50 loaves but was too cheap to buy them! When I think about teaching or selling my stuff, the market is often the wealthy, and I don't like (being around) rich people very much either!

    I do think "middle" income folks do value quality products. Everything costs more these days, so you might as well pay a little extra to get the good stuff, and to support sustainable and local businesses. I'm relatively poor, but I just have to choose wisely what to blow my money on :)
     
  20. terrythetaod

    terrythetaod Well-Known Member

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    When I first read that article, I thought "A thousand bucks for medical emergencies!? That's crazy!". A thousand bucks wouldn't pay begin to pay for a real emergency. But, then I thought, "So what?" If one of them ran up a 100,000 dollar hospital bill, what would it mean to them? They have little to lose. And that's not such a bad place to be.