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I can't help you with the breeds - there are not a lot of breeds in this neck of the woods, so I have no experience with anything other than Boer, LaMancha, and Kiko - but the first one looks to be pretty young - maybe somewhere around 8 months old, maybe a little older. It's hard to tell exactly because she is so thin and that will affect her growth. The 2nd one is in better condition - so he could be somewhere around a year, maybe 18 months. I would hazard a guess that the 2nd one is maybe a Pygmy or possibly a Nigerian Dwarf, but I could be wrong on that because I have no depth perception so it's hard for me to tell size. I'm going more on coloring. I don't think that the first one is Kiko - horns aren't right, and it's probably not Boer - coloring isn't right, definitely not a LaMancha - ears aren't right. Maybe a Sanaan?

ETA: If these were my goats, I would be drawing blood and testing for CAE and CL immediately! If either one comes up positive, send them back to the sale barn. You really don't want either one in your herd. Although CL is more of a nuisance thing, it is very, very difficult to get rid of once an abscess has burst and it gets in the ground, and causes long term problems. CAE, on the other hand, can kill kids, cause hard udders, milking issues, is passed through colostrum and milk thus infecting the does kids, shorten a does productive life, and can cause long term health issues in the doe.
 

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First one's not a Saanen... Saanens have upright ears. My first thought is some kind of Boer cross.
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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Oh, dear. There is so much to learn for someone new to goats. Those are Mutt Cross brush goats. If you are wanting dairy goats, take them back to the sale. Auction barn goats are notoriously diseased.
 

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1: from the forehead, the width and sweep of the horns and the tilt and length of the ears I'm going to guess part Boer. There is no roman nose that would indicate Nubian.That refined and dished nose makes me think Nigerian, but possibly Saanen or LaManch. The predominant white also points to Saanen. Looks 4-5 months old, maybe older by length of horns.

2: Ticking(freckle type spots) and airplane ears look Nubian. Color pattern and muzzle look Alpine. 10-12 months?

As suggested, testing is advisable, and quarantine from other goats. Get a fecal exam done. The first looks like he could be having some cocci/worm issues and weaning/separation could cause a big bloom. Check some of the threads on worming, don't just use what the feedstore gives you.

If you don't know what they were being fed, its best to start them out with quality hay and add the grain and/or browse in slowly. I'm assuming they're both wethers? Don't over do the grain. The first one is thin from parasite issues, get them under control and he will pick up weight in due time.

We're always happy to answer questions. Goats have a big learning curve but are a pleasure to raise. Success depends on getting informed and solving little problems before they become big ones.
 

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First thing that popped in my head ... they have ear tags which leads me to believe they came from a meat breeding herd since dairy don't ear tag, least none that I know. 2nd the blue roan hit me as a maybe a kinder.. just has a pygmy Nubian look. first one with the dominant white, sweep of the horns and dished face makes me think there is saanen in there but the droop of the ears...that one almost looks kiko or spanish but you shouldn't find too many of those at auctions. Age is hard to tell without truly knowing the breed mix given standard size or cross mix. I don't see boer in either of them.
You didn't state if these were bucks or doe's.
 

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They have to be scrapies tagged to go through auction. Good chance they were tagged right before sale, dairy or no. Technically auctions can use either scrapies or registration tattoos instead of scrapies tags to ID, but nobody wants to read tattoos in a dark sale barn, and you can't ID from far away.

Agree, if you want to raise goats for a purpose, I wouldn't suggest using these for anything but meat. Most people who jump into goats aren't successful and it's mostly because of starting out with poor quality animals and not doing enough research.Even if they were perfectly healthy when they went TO the sale, diseases are everywhere in sale barns. Sale barns are not a place to buy breeding quality animals, IMO. Testing now wouldn't even tell you if they picked up anything at the barn, as it can take weeks/months for diseases to show up on a test. If they were positive before the sale, that would show up on a test.

White one my guess is boer cross, or saanen/nubian.

Dark one my guess is alpine/nubian. Swiss marked but roaned, slightly crimped ears.

Both look young to me.

Could be totally wrong on either of those. Crossbreds can do funny things with phenotypes. :)
 

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Hopefully you have healthy goats, but coming from auction it's a crapshoot and a risk I would never take. Check their gums and particularly the eyelid membranes for color. It should be a healthy deep pink/red. If pale or even worse, white they require worming. And yes, have blood drawn to test for the major diseases. They will need regular hoof trims as well. You will find this forum very helpful as you go along and learn in this wonderful world of goaties. Best of luck.
 

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I'm new to goats and my wife picked these up at the auction.
What was your wife's goal for these goats? She must have been there for a reason. Auction sheep and goats are typically not breeding quality animals except for butchering for your freezer, and that's without thinking of the health issues. Meat? Milk? Brush control? Or?

Do the scrapie ear tags have the same flock number and consecutive individual numbers? If so, they were probably applied at the sale barn and won't help with tracing. Sale barns around here mostly require them even for baby meat lambs and kids. Their business so their rules if you want to sell through them. Lots of dairy goat farms around here and it can be a good outlet for young bucklings.

Don't be discouraged and use this as a learning experience for both of you.

Peg
 

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Hey! Welcome to the addiction of GOATS!

You got a couple of cute scrub babies there. But don't beat yourself up. I'd venture a guess that those two are going to enjoy a nicer life with you than what they had in store otherwise.

We don't know your Goat Goals, and we could answer your questions a bit better if you'd share what you're dreaming of doing with your caprine cuties. ;)

All of us were/are/continue to be learning about goats. We help each other, and most of us are supportive and kind.

Tell us where you're headed, so we can join you on your journey!
 
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