What breed should we use to AI our jersey cow?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by jimandpj, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. jimandpj

    jimandpj Well-Known Member

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    I have a 5 year old, purebred jersey cow that we need to get AI'd. We need to decide which breed to use. If the calf is a boy, we are definitely going to eat it. If the calf is female, we will most likely eat it too, but there is always a chance we might want/need to replace the jersey cow with the heifer. This is our first cow, so we have no experience with this. I would love any advice and input on what breed bull you think we should use. This is also our first experience with AI, so any advice on that would be great as well. Thanks in advance,
    PJ
     
  2. lyceum

    lyceum Well-Known Member

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    If you want the calf for beef, I would have her AIed to a beef breed bull. If you wanted a heifer calf to replace her someday, I would breed her Jersey. You can eat dairy steers, but they are not going to be as well muscled as a beef breed. We have a heifer that is half beef (Belted Galloway) and half Jersey. She is not as well muscled as out full beef calves. She is more dairy built. If you were to go beef, go Angus.

    Is this the same cow that calved a few weeks ago? If so, she will not breed until at least 2 months after calving. So, you have time to make the decision.

    Lyceum
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    A hereford/jersey is a good combo. They don't come out super beefy, but they do beef up nicely if they are a male. Being the Jersey influence will be there, and if it is a heifer. It isn't easy to get a beefy calf. if it is a male, they all seem to beef up.


    Jeff
     
  4. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    You will have to make up your mind.

    If you breed her to a Jersey you will have a 50% chance of getting a heifer much more valuable than a half-jersey beef bull. You will also have a 50% chance of getting a jersey bull calf, less valuable in my mind than a beef/jersey crossbred.

    There are people who will argue with me that a jersey bull is a fine beef calf. If you accept that argument the case for breeding to a AI jersey bull is even stronger.
    Ox
     
  5. milkinpigs

    milkinpigs Dairy/Hog Farmer

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    Use an Angus bull with epd for the most milk you can find,if it's a bull calf it will be good beef and if it's a heifer you can milk her ...
     
  6. Kelle in MT

    Kelle in MT Well-Known Member

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    We have a Jersey and this year we bred her back(AIed) her to a Jersey, we of course are praying for a heifer. A year and a half ago she gave birth to a half Jersey half Brown Swiss(she came to us bred) She had a hard delivery, I think Brown Swiss was to big of a breed to bred a Jersey to, that's just my opinion though. She gave birth to a bull, which we made a steer and we butchered him in Oct at 1-1/2 yrs old. He netted us 576 lbs of the most tender beef we've ever eaten and his fat wasn't yellow, like is common with Jerseys. If you want a beef why not buy a calf to put on her after she freshens and sell the calf if it is a bull, you'd make more money this way too. If it's a heifer, you'd make even more, especially around here, Jerseys are hard to find.
     
  7. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Breeding a swiss to a Jersey (swiss being the bull), is like breeding a holstein to a Jersey. Swiss and Holsteins are about the same in size, have the same hip size, etc etc. Not sure why someone would do that. Using a Jersey bull on a swiss, or Holstein is normal, but not the other way around.



    Jeff
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Since you are going to AI the Jersey you have an opportunity to use the breed of bull of your choice. I suggest you consider a Murray Grey. Most people do not know what a Murray Grey breed is. I happen to have just a few of them. They are great animals. They do not get much larger than a Large Jersey. The calves are born small, 60 lbs. range. The cows give plenty of milk but thrive on lower quality forage. The bulls are docile and muscular. The best thing is the calves. As stated above they come into the world rather small so there is no calving problem. With the cows milk that weight soon changes to where they catch up and often exceed the Angus. As they grow they remind me of a Caterpilar bulldozer as they are so compact and strong. The only reason that I do not have more of them is I have not been able to access a bull that will throw black calves.
     
  9. arcticow

    arcticow Well-Known Member

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  10. arcticow

    arcticow Well-Known Member

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    Right, agmantoo. Take a little time to decide, it's for a whole year. It's your cow & any medium breed bull w/average or above calving ease should be safe for a Jersey cow. Advice is ok, but don't let anybody tell you like they have it all figured out. Read the words under agmantoo's name.
     
  11. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi PJ,
    After many years of mucking around with various breeds and cross-breeds, I've come to the conclusion there is only two choices when it comes to the Jersey - either put her back to a Jersey or give the Angus a go.

    A Jersey steer won't have the size or muscleing of a beef breed but hey, your not sending him to the works and wanting big money. Your wanting some nice meat in your freezer and he will certainly give you that. The fat will be yellow but so what. By choice I keep Jersey for our freezer and feel that it's a vastly under rated meat.

    I bought an Angus bull at the end of last year and the first of his progeny hit the ground just over a month ago. They were to Jersey and Jersey cross cows. Every one popped out like peas out of a pod and are developing into beautiful looking calves. From now on all my bulls will be Angus.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  12. Jennifer L.

    Jennifer L. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want to milk the calf, don't use Angus. Angus are good milkers, but they are short season cows, and their milk really drops off after 5 months (when the calf would normally be weaned) next to dairy animals. This DOES show up in the cross! Ask me how I know. :) Go with Jersey. You can eat a Jersey bull just like anyone else and the heifer calf will be worth more (even if it is a Jersey it will be at least purebred).

    I would not be afraid at all to AI a Jersey cow to a Holstein bull if the cow has freshened a few times AND you use a bull high on calving ease index, which you will be able to do by using AI. I'd never do it natural service, though, since you wouldn't know what you'd get for a calf.

    Jennifer
     
  13. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Ronney, not to hijack the thread but do you have Murray Greys in your area? I know they originate out of Australia and thought you may be able to share more information as they are nearer yourself. TIA
     
  14. Rick Allen

    Rick Allen Well-Known Member

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    You can buy sexed semen and be about 90% sure of what sex you will get.

    If you want a cow, in my opinion, the extra expense of sexed semen is worth the extra cost because a purebred jersey steer won't give you as much meat or be as valuble at the sale barn as an Angus cross steer.

    As far as a replacement cow goes:
    for more milk with high fat content AI her to a Guersey
    for more milk with lower fat and high protien content AI her to an Ayrshire
    for less milk and more beef AI to Milking Devon
    for less milk and a beefy duel purpose but smaller animal AI to a Dexter
    for the best resale value for a cow AI back to a Jersey.
    If she's registered definately breed back with sexed semen to a Jersey. A registered heffer will bring a very high resale price. You could sell the heffer and buy 2 or 3 beef steers./RA
     
  15. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    My vote is still with a hereford. Many many farmers I know of, have used herefords to breed to Jerseys. They will be beefy, and will have a good temperament to go along with it too. With the one angus we had, I would never buy another angus bull again. Not saying angus are all nuts, but anyone who I have talked with around here, all agrees, angus can be tricky.


    Jeff
     
  16. jimandpj

    jimandpj Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your input! You've given us the kind of advice I was hoping for. I now feel like we have some information to make something of an informed decision.

    PJ
     
  17. DJ in WA

    DJ in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Jennifer,
    I wish my half angus cow had read the book. I had a hard time drying her up at 10 months. I've decided this lactation to start earlier to milk less frequently so her production will drop earlier. Granted one cow may be an exception.

    PJ, another thought to throw in the mix is angus bull should throw polled calves. Messing with horns or horn buds is one chore many newbies would rather avoid.

    Black color of black angus is dominant gene. If you want to keep some color, try red angus.

    If you want a smaller replacement with less milk than Jersey, try lowline angus. Of course, depends on how much milk you want. Do you need all the milk a purebred Jersey gives?

    Of course
     
  18. Kelle in MT

    Kelle in MT Well-Known Member

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    The people who we bought her from thought, because they were told she was a Brown Swiss by the person they'd gotten her from. I'm in full agreement and we were sweating bullets as she delivered. We did end up helping pull the calf with each of her last contractions. The calf(bull) weighed about 85# at birth. We gave her a year off and she is now AI'ed to a Jersey bull, so we pray fro a heifer and that the birth will be easier, which I'm sure it will be.
     
  19. crowinghen

    crowinghen Well-Known Member

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    I second the Murray Gray! My first-time calver ( Hereford) had a 60 lb MG heifer calf- that is a TANK! She's about the stockiest calf i've ever seen- her sire was Tuorong Park Igor ,I think... Easy birth ( which is what I wanted for her first time) but such a great grower that I would chose that combo again.

    IF you decide you want to go for beef, that is.

    Good luck with your decision- isn't AI great?!

    Susie
     
  20. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Agman,
    To the best of my knowledge there are no Murray Gray herds in my immediate area but I belong to a NZ based website that has a member who breeds them. I've contacted her to ask if she has a website of her own and failing that, would she be happy about you contacting her via email. She posts photos now and again and her cattle are something else again.

    Apart from that, I know about as much as you - they orginated in the Murray Gray River area of Australia and (I think) were a cross with and Angus and something else. Hardly informative :shrug: The only one I have ever owned was crossed with a Friesian but he grew well, was mild in temperament and an altogether nice beast. If I were to ever go into beef cattle it would be a toss up between the Angus and MG.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie