What Breed is Healthiest

Discussion in 'Goats' started by tduerson, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. tduerson

    tduerson Well-Known Member

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    I was just reading the post about "Gotta Love Nubians" it mentioned that Nubians where considered to not be a very healthy breed and tend to get sick alot. I was wondering in everyones opinion "What is the healthiest Breed that tends to not get sick and catch every thing going around. Which ones are the easiest to take care of." I jsut have pets 1 Boer Doe and 2 Pygmy Does. I use to have another Boer Doe as well. In the past year I have dealt with and over came 2 bouts of Listeriosis/Polio with the 2 Boer Does - 1 time each. My Pygmy's have been just fine thus far.
    Tina
     
  2. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    what i dont understand- is that as long as nubians have been around- why havent they been bred for vigor and health?
    there are swiss breeds atha have been raised as livestock (including culling) and they seem so much less trouble. yes, i handled a pet swiss alpine.
    seems a shame, i can think of two reasons for this right off, but what- im not a goat raiser.
     

  3. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    I raise Nubians & Pygmies & haven't found much difference with any. I have also had Lamanchas. The only goat that I think is hardier is a cross-bred one. There you have the best of both kinds & they seem to be hardier all the way around. A lot of people do not like "mutt" goats though. I do feel some are breeding more for show than for vigor. They want a goat that will win ribbons. I want a goat that will be a great homestead milker. She may not win in a showring, but she will put milk on the table which is what a goat should be doing. :D

    **Before all of you people that show start throwing punches, I did not say "all" show goats are that way.**
     
  4. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In my barn, they have to show AND milk <G> My girls earn their living feeding calves. My best milker can feed 2 holstein calves completely by herself, and she won a GCH leg and BOB this year. :)

    I haven't really had any problems with mine -- mostly Alpines, but the doe above is a Snubian. I like that cross so much, I am thinking of buying another, even though I really shouldn't, lol.

    Tracy
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Founder (laminitis), Mastitis, Entertoxemia, Polio, hypocalcemia, worms, cocci, pasturella pnemonia, chemical pnemonia, poisioning, failure to thrive in kids (inclduing nearly all infant mortality caused by ecoli etc), White muscle disease, perceived Ketosis, Tetanus, Listerosis, the transmission of CAE, Johnnes, CL, Q fever etc....are all caused by us and with our neglect cause death in our goats.

    Anyone who can put their name on any of the above as causing death or illness in their herd should not be blaming the breed of goat but putting the blame squarly on their management or lack there of.

    When your criteria for picking your goats come because they have long floppy ears, have spots, are cheap or free and there are thousands more Nubians than any other breed of goats in the US...yep some of you will start, like I did with the worst goats in the world! In some cases their immunity/health/feet/udder is such that mercifully the best place for them to go after they leave your farm is your freezer or the ground. Add to this the way goats become sentimental pets instead of the livestock they are and you have people who further keep every buck, every doe on the place just because they are cute, even if it takes lifesaving procedures to just get them breathing when born.

    I would venture to say that there is no other livestock that is purchased on a whim, my first goat came home before I had a barn or one fence, no other livestock could you do this with. And if the barn isn't ready it means nothing is ready. You couple any of this with the fact that there are few books and fewer vets who give any correct information on the health of this livestock, and of course there are horrid goats out there.

    I don't know anyone who shows who could afford to have glamore girls who where ill, who didn't fill their udders daily..rememeber we have to have full udders to show, how could you then get her to a show with no milk, or poor feet, or a ruined udder? Our goats have to make money to afford us to show, so that means selling milk and breeding stock. There's a preceived elitest attitude from us who show, when actually the opposite is true. Our girls go out there and prove their worth all show season long, you can't fake that udder full of milk. Even the largest show herds that have Natioanl Champions have does who milk for a living.

    I have milked every breed and cross thereof excpet oberhasli (they are too small and have on a whole very poor udder conformation to live in the woods and milk) I do think LaMancha's and the crosses of them are spectacular animals, the biggest thing Lamancha's have going for them (least wise the ones around here) are the utilty of their udder even when they aren't well bred, they have a will to milk unsurpassed by any other breed in our heat and humidity. But then most of you have heard me say that before.

    Any breeder can tell you about their 12 year old Nubian, Saanen, Togg, Oberhasli, Alpine etc., and that does 14 year old mother. So obviously there are healthy specimens of each breed.

    I choose Nubians because they have the potential to make you money, if I did not have to make money off my farm I would have LaMancha's. Well and honestly a few of my favorite Nubians. Vicki
     
  6. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    "The only goat that I think is hardier is a cross-bred one"

    however it is quite nice to hear from a nubian breeder who grows out enough stock and has the knowlege to select for vigor!

    well as you all must know, the generic form of nubian is the one showing up here as teh goat that has something. if i may make a suggestion-
    if all that is said about kinder goats is true, then they have the alleged hardiness of the pygmy goat.
    i lookd at thier picuters and they are breeding for essentially mini nubian type plus a bit of muscle.i would say in a few generations they would have it down pat.
    isnt it true that a goat that is 7/8 or more blood considered registratable as purebred?
    perhaps all can look to the mini varieties that are coming up to add a dash of vigor to the breeds....