What are your favorite potato varieties?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Cyngbaeld, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I was looking at seed potatoes online and there is a really amazing selection. Can't make up my mind! What kinds do you all like and why?
     
  2. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like King Edwards for baking and french fries, Maris Pipers for mash and Desiree as a red skinned variety. Can't find any of them here in the US, but those are my favorites.
     

  3. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    Rose Gold & Yukon Gold are my current favorites. Good flavor and eye appeal
     
  4. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    Yukon Gold for flavor and appearance. I think the russet varieties we grew were Idaho or Kennebec. They were extremely prolific. Last year we planted 3 20' rows and got over 200 lb of potatoes. Those were mostly russets, but half a row of a red variety (which don't do as well) and half a row of Yukon Gold. The Yukon's didn't produce as many either, but are beautiful and delicious.

    The secret, of course, was in the hilling. The first hilling was done when the plants were about a foot high. We hilled until only the very tip tops of the plants were visible to light. We may or may not have hilled again. No, I don't think we did hill a second time. Boy, did we ever get a mountain of big beautiful potatoes. Of course, this year, I let the potato hiller choose his own method (because I wasn't helping this time) and the hills only went a third of the way up the plant. Between that and the drought, we had measly potato harvest this year. He doesn't remember us doing the foot high hilling last year so . . . it was all my imagination, you know. :rolleyes:

    I guess it helps to know that potatoes are produced along the stem of the plant, not the rootzone. You live and you learn. :shrug:
     
  5. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    I love Yukon Gold's. The flavour is great and I don't find the flesh to be mealy like the Idahos or the Whites.
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I like the yukon gold too. But I prefer something mealy for baking or mashing. The yukons do well for potato salad or frying or in stews. They don't fall apart like the mealy ones do.

    Have any of you grown the purples, blues or reds (flesh colored red, not just the skin)?
     
  7. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    We get lots of really cool old potatoes in this country. Lots of them are purple or at least part purple & date back from when the whalers were here. I've got several varieties that were discovered feral at the sites of old whaling stations. I doubt you can get them where you are unfortunately. Or, if you can, I doubt they'd have the same names. But I would recommend you try some of the older old varieties. Vastly better flavour than the desiree type potatoes.

    How not to be heaps of use! But I was here & thought I would say hi :)
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Hi, Liselle! Wish I could try some of the old ones. email me a few, why doncha?
     
  9. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We grew some purple ones this year - they were very nice as new potatoes, but as they matured the skins became very tough. We like to eat our spuds skin and all, but not these skins. The flowers were blue too which was pretty neat.
     
  10. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Purple potatoes are really cool to grow, but they didn't get very big here. A girlfriend told me she found purple sweet potatoes at the grocery store.
    Our fav's are always Yukon Gold, we haven't had much luck growing pot's here (except for Kanabeks) the soil is really funny w. root crops (working on it). We have to be really careful at the stores here, they label bags as "yellow fleshed potatoes" but they aren't the REAL Yukon Golds, they are sandy and gritty :grump: Bluckkkk!!!
     
  11. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    Here's a site all of you looking for different potatoes might like:

    http://www.woodprairie.com/catalog/index.html

    You can order red, white and blue potatoes - organic even.

    I like this company. A bit pricey but you can save your own seed next year. A word of warning though. Some of the varieties sell out early so order early.
     
  12. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    mistletoad, I know Ronniger's has Desiree, we grew them this year. I think they also have Maris Piper.

    http://www.ronnigers.com/

    We grew Red Gold from Ronnigers this year. They were the best potato I've ever eaten. We got a variety pack from them, including a couple kinds of fingerlings. Hated the fingerlings, and wasn't really impressed with any of the others. Part of it may be that we get pretty hot and humid weather so some of the varieties carried by northern potato seed companies don't do well here. We realized that except for the Red Gold we like best the red, cobbler and russet potato varieties that our local farmers co-op carries the seed potatoes for. They are really cheap too - I don't remember exactly but I know they weren't more than 39 cents a pound.
     
  13. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    mistletoad, I just looked on ronniger's site and they also carry King Edward.
     
  14. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I, too, love the Yukon Gold. Tasty, nice texture, and good lookin'.

    For our "regular" spuds, I grow Kennebec and Red Norlands. But seeing all the different types available, I think I may give a couple more a try next year.

    Pony!
     
  15. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    From one Paula to another, thanks, I will have to check that out.
     
  16. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    brahmaMama check out the no dig method here

    www.soil-health.org.nz/pastissues/mayjun02/organic_potaotes.htm

    I am using it with a bull kelp base instead of newspaper with some of my potatoes. The rest I planted in my old horse poo piles which are a mix of horse poo & soiled hay. I made furrows in there. Added compost straight out of my chook run & seaweed off the beach. Planted the potatoes & covered them in more compost & mulched up with soiled hay. They are all looking very good!

    Cyngbaeld the article I linked to mentions growing potatoes from seed. I am sure you must be able to as there are literally thousands of potato varieties & they must have come from somewhere. I just wonder why all the old potatoes we had rediscovered growing feral in this country are still true to type & there aren't any rogues. I am planning to see if I can collect any seed of mine & see if it grows so I will send you some if I can.
     
  17. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    I raise Kennebecs...even though,I didn't realize that was how it's spelled. I just think now,how many times have I handed over my list to the workers at the feed and seed store...."50 lbs. Kenny Back potatoes....". Haha,they probably laugh once I'm gone.
     
  18. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Seaweed, that would be lovely. If you want it to come true you will need to pollinate the flower from the same variety potato. Many of the new varieties are crosses and they have to be grown from actual seeds to hybridize. The reason your old varieties continue to breed true is that they are grown from tubers rather than seeds.

    I wonder if the old purple varieties have more vitamin C than the white and yellows? I know the seamen would sometimes eat raw potatoes to keep scurvey at bay.
     
  19. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    I've read that the purple varieties have a much higher anti-oxidant content. They taste better too. The husband is a north islander & misses his kumara a lot. I made him some mashed purple potatoes with lots of butter the other day & he reckoned they were as tasty as kumara.

    With the old varieties being feral, I would have expected them to have formed seed as they literally grew wild probably for over a hundred years. Yet we have the same variety which was found in several places. As they were wild, no one was collecting them so they would have set seed. I would have expected variations there as well. Unless, of course, they just pollinated themselves. Then, in the lack of any other potato sepcies around to cross pollinate with, they have remained pure.

    I will need to investigate potato pollination :)
     
  20. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the Link! :) I put it in my Fav's list beacause I'm :sleep: I'll check it out Tommorow.