What are babysavers?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by jdnetone, Jun 11, 2004.

  1. jdnetone

    jdnetone Member

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    What does a babysaver do and how do you build them? I will soon build some cages for my new rabbits that I plan on breeding. My plan was to use ½” X 1” hardware cloth on the floor of the doe cages is this size ok to use? I am new to raising rabbits and would appreciate any information.
     
  2. Pat Lamar

    Pat Lamar Well-Known Member Supporter

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    "Babysaver" wire prevents the errant kit from falling through the sides of the cage, especially newborns born outside the nest box, as they will creep to try to find the mother doe and other kits. Sometimes, a nursing kit will hang onto the teat too long and is drug out of the nest box when the doe leaves.

    Babysaver wire is usually a strip of wire with smaller hole dimensions and about two to 3 inches high which runs around all sides of the wire cage. Babysaver wire is very expensive and most commercial breeders don't use it, preferring instead to make regular and often barn checks when does are kindling to find these errant kits early and pop them into the nest box. Although the 1/2" x 1" is the preferred size for bottom wire, it is also more expensive than the 1" x 2". Most breeders prefer to use the 1" x 2" for the sides and top. Of course, the kits can fall through the 1" x 2", which is what generated the idea for "babysaver wire." So, the answer to your question is basically dependent upon how much you're willing to spend on making your cages, and how much time you wish to spend on making barn checks.

    Pat Lamar
    President
    Professional Rabbit Meat Association
    http://www.prma.org/
     

  3. dlwelch

    dlwelch Well-Known Member

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    I would not recommend using hardware cloth at all. I'm sure most
    rabbit producers would suggest that you use welded wire for your
    cage floors. We use 1/2" x 1" welded wire for our cage floors as do most of
    the breeders I know.

    Most commercial breeders that I know do use the "baby saver" wire.
    Even the ones who don't use the "baby saver" will purchase wider
    floor wire and bend up the wire to extend several inches up the sides of
    the cages. The baby saver wire (in our area) is not that much more
    expensive so we prefer to use it. It adds about $1.50 to the cost
    of the cage.

    If you only have a few cages to build, it may not be worthwhile to
    follow any of my suggestions. :p

    Good luck with your new project.

    Linda Welch
    Texas
     
  4. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    Another 'tip' on the 1/2" x 1" 'babysaver' wire...... It is useful to put BETWEEN hutches/holes/cages if they are in a 'length' to prevent fur loss, biting between cages. Those bunny teeth can still rip and tear the next door neighbor through 1" x 2". (This is mostly a 'show bunny' feature! They NEED their fur and skin intact!:):)
     
  5. jessandcody

    jessandcody Well-Known Member

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    Since we are new breeders on a tight budget was this...

    We had bought some cages for a really cheap price, but they needed some work. While we were repairing holes, etc...we went ahead and wrapped 1/2" x 1/2" hardware cloth on the bottom of the cages. We also covered about 5-6 inches up each side. Clipped it all in place. It seems to be working great.

    - Jess
     
  6. jdnetone

    jdnetone Member

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    Tennessee
    Thank you for the information I understand now what a baby saver is.

    I was going to make all of my cage out of 1” X ½” welded wire. I can’t seem to fine the 1” X 2” wire to build the top and sides of the cage, but I am still looking.
     
  7. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    I see no problem with that at all! Especially if you have it on hand or are not building very many cages. The cost factor really only matters if you're gonna have LOTS of bunny cages!! (and just wait.... it's only a matter of time....) :D