What about corn?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Silvercreek Farmer, May 26, 2006.

  1. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

    Messages:
    2,198
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    Alright, I have never raised a pig, but plan to in the next 2-3 years, it seems like in the olden days all people fed their pigs was whole corn and scraps, A lot of people have been talking about 16-18% rations, and I know corn is only about 7-9%. Can I raise a pig on pasture (Also from reading that I guess will have to ring them (sadly) to keep them from just destroying the pasture) with nothing but whole corn, or perhaps some wheat? (Well, plus some scraps)
     
  2. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    851
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Location:
    Ky
    ours get corn, veg scraps and pasture
     

  3. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    353
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2003
    Location:
    Southern Tier NY.
    people fed corn forever before they figured out the specific formula's to grow a pig to a specific size in a given amount of time to get it ready to butcher. of course they did this to spend as little money as possible. less feed more profit.
    you can raise a hog on most anything if you choose.
    if you have a good breed for pasture type raising then you dont have to worry to much about protien levels & some kinds of minerals, but you will want to make sure it has the choice to get the other minerals they need to grow well.
    Our feed is a protien concentrate mixed with corn, the concentrate contains all the minerals a hog needs to thrive, the corn is a filler, & the pasture gives it all balance.
    Rick
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    The extra amount of corn needed to grow them is usualy enough to pay for the protien supplement needed to bring the percentage up to optimal levels best suited for good growth.
    I have seen test groups at Purdue that were feed differently, but all had access to alfalfa pasture. The lowest cost per pound of gain was with only corn and minerals and alfalfa to furnish he extra protien. This group of hogs weren't nearly as uniform in size when they got over 200 lb. as the other groups were but cost less to get there.
     
  5. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    My pigs do great on pasture, scraps and cracked corn. I only feed the corn when I have no scraps. Don't ring the pigs. Let them do their thing to the pasture. They will turn it up in some spots, but a years rest with another type of animal on it and a little seed will fix the pasture up just fine.

    Pete
     
  6. Jen South

    Jen South Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    423
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2006
    Location:
    Sandy, Oregon
    I have a couple of meat hogs that will need to be finished for slaughter in about 6 weeks or sooner. Do I finish them on corn? When do I worm? and when is it time to worm before sluaghter, and how long on corn? I have forgotten.... :help:

    Thanks, Jen
     
  7. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,386
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2005
    Location:
    Keene-Green-Bratt Triangle
    My pigs don't like corn! Last night I gave them corn mixed in with their feed and this morning the feed was gone and all the corn still in the bowl. What's up with that?!
     
  8. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,280
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Right Here
    Protein is what makes all livestock grow not corn, which is a fatten-er and high energy source.

    If all you have been giving your pigs is store bought feed, it has corn already in it.
    But when you dump corn into it you have change the taste and they are spoiled on one type of flavor.
    If you add more corn it will add more fat to the pigs, but you will have to add it in small amounts at first. They don't like the change, which is different to them.


    Corn is used to put on fat.
    Corn is not used to grow livestock.


    bumpus
    .
     
  9. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Arizona
    I have been told that rolled barley puts on more meat than fat - does anyone know if this is true or not? It was said that it is a better grain to feed once they are bigger (100lbs or so) to 'finish' them.

    niki
     
  10. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,280
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Right Here
  11. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    851
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Location:
    Ky
    Barley has a higher protein and fiber content than corn so theoretically would be "better" but availability is a problem. Our mill doesn't handle it because nobody around here grows it


     
  12. Mountain Mick

    Mountain Mick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    615
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2005
    Location:
    Baree, Mount Morgan, Queensland Australia
    I was taught by an old German guy that I first started working with on a large pig farm. Told me now sonny if you want nice lead pork you must feed your pigs mean to keep them lean, each pig get as must food that they can eat in ten minutes twice a day as the little pigies get bigger they get more food, the pig must be hungry when you feed in the morning and in the afternoon when you feed up. this feed goes up to the last week before d day for this last week I feed them a little extra in the form of fresh tomatoes & fruits this help in sweeting the meat, The feed mix that I feed for the first four week after weaning so up till they are ten weeks old is 40%bran 60% pollard [millrun] mix this is mixed up with boiling water to make a runny porridge consistency. at week ten I then start adding boiled [by boiling this help the pig to digest it easier] corn sorghum barley & rye [this is all hammer milled] this add to the Millrun mix at 50:50 and then add boiled water I try and feed this a no hotter than 39°C [102.2°F] and no colder than 37.5°C [99.5°F] the pigs will try and jump in to the feed bucket or toff. I have been feeding pig this way for well over twenty five years, We get a fat score of 11mm [less than 1/2"] Our butcher all ways said if we have got any spare one he buy then at top dollar as they make lovely lean bacon and hams. And the belly flaps are to die for cook up as Chinese spare ribs.

    :viking:
    Mad Mick