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Should be an economical light duty hauler. Light weight is good for milage but not for traction. I have a 07 ram 1500 and i think it is already too light. The older trucks ive drove seemed to do much better in the snow.
 

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Should be an economical light duty hauler. Light weight is good for milage but not for traction. I have a 07 ram 1500 and i think it is already too light. The older trucks ive drove seemed to do much better in the snow.
I was thinking the same not Good on snow and ice. I do like Fords though.

big rockpile
 

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I don't get it...does this save them money...or is it just for the people who just drive their trucks in the city? So you would accomplish better gas mileage, and more delays (by virtue of being stuck) if you used it like a real truck.
 

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Less rust in the north :sing: Ever here of a load of fire wood in the rear :D
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only it will cost so much MORE to replace the damage!:buds::yuck:

Note: Exchange the word rust for "salt" above.

It's long past my bedtime and guess I'm a bit tired.
 
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Actually, the composite recipe they're using for the aluminum is supposed to be harder to dent than the super-thin steel they're currently using.
Mine is so cheezy thin metal, that it bends, flexes, and dents like crazy.

I have a 2012 F150 and it feels paper thin. My previous pickup was much more study of a skin as the 1995 metal recipe. I had it 20 years almost, and it didn't look too bad. This new one is going to look horrid in No Time!

My EcoBeast got 28.6 mpg on nice flat OK driving... And also has something like 380 ft lbs of torque, so it isn't a shrinking violet in the power department.

As for light weight... All pickups have poor traction if there is nothing in the bed over the drive axle. Carry a couple bags of sand over the back axle if you're worried about getting stuck in snow. Dual purpose: additional weight, or traction by the shovelful.

I was leery of this new pickup because it peels out quite easily because of its power and the foot pedal is electronic and sensitive... But there is computerized traction control that can be turned off in two stages. When it is running, I have yet to lose grip due to rain. Although I have had fun a few times with the skinny pedal on purpose. :)
 

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Aerated high strength structural aluminum is simply the next development in automotive frames that originally started with wood then progressed to steel and now have progressed to this alloy. Carbon nanotube composite will probably be the next progression.

Weight related traction issues when needed to be addressed will be addressed with adding extra weight in the bed same as folks have done for decades.

My favorite means of adding weight when needed for traction on snow and ice was to use the shovel I keep in my pickup to simply shovel extra snow into the bed.

When the snow and ice on the roads melted so did the ballast weight snow in the pick up bed.
 

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It should rust less too though.... but losing 800lbs in weight can't be good for traction and trailering control... I'll stick with the Pre-97 models for now ;)
 

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How many days does the average driver need extra weight for snow? I would think that it would be well down there list of problems to solve with a new design.
Where do you live Wanda?
Here I need it four months of the year.
I use sand bags and at least two buckets of dry sand.
The dry sand is also used for traction under the tires.
 

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I think the aluminum body for the new F-150 could be a very good seller for Ford.

I believe that buyers will gravitate to the new F-150, especially if the MPG are as good as they are claiming.

Personally, I think that all aluminum bodies are going to become very popular. Manufacturers have been producing body panels, namely hoods and trunk lids, for many years, to save weight and improve fuel economy, and the average person doesn't even know it.
 

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Heck, my '99 needs weight in the bed to make it up a gravel driveway in the summer. It's an F-150 with the triton V8, but is sprung like an F-250.
Keep the bed steel, just make front end and cab aluminum.

Matt
 

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I think the aluminum body for the new F-150 could be a very good seller for Ford.

I believe that buyers will gravitate to the new F-150, especially if the MPG are as good as they are claiming.

Personally, I think that all aluminum bodies are going to become very popular. Manufacturers have been producing body panels, namely hoods and trunk lids, for many years, to save weight and improve fuel economy, and the average person doesn't even know it.
I do too. And for the most part many drivers these days drive on nice plowed winter roads. Heck I have not put on snow tires on either of my vehicles for the last 30+ years. Don't need em.
And as far as adding weight to my PU a couple of bags of sand over the wheel wells works great.
I remember back when I had my police car it ha a special tranny in it. A auto one back you could not shift it into 1st gear manually You Could ONLY manually shift it into 2nd gear so all that power was Not transferred to the tires as you started out in 2nd. Using it as in auto it would start out in 1st gear, Manually you only had 2nd. And that was a Ford too. LOL
And with todays computer controlled trannies and such, I am sure get going in snow isn't that big a problem. ~!
And the way I read things on this PU from FORD it is just the sides, the Box, that is aluminum. Not the frame~!
 
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