wetland uses?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mustard, Nov 23, 2006.

  1. mustard

    mustard Active Member

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    Up with a cold, not usually online this time of the a.m.....

    I have a chance to buy 2 acres, good price, but 1 acre is classified "wetlands"...the other acre slopes up, and is high and dry...the wetland area looks like it's got good grazing potential, at least for waterfowl...

    I already have one high and dry acre in the immediate area, about 1/4 mile away, but it's going to take a lot of work and time to get some pasture grasses growing on this parcel...

    Question is: can I graze animals on wetlands?...I know that it is done in some cases, but can't find anything online that addresses when it's allowed...

    I have ducks and geese and hope to get goats and a pony...

    And I've lived for years in swampy areas, so the mosquitoes don't bother me that much...

    Mustard
     
  2. shellyr44

    shellyr44 Well-Known Member

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    The question first to ask, is if the wetlands are deamed protected wetlands. We have 9 acreas of state protected wetlands which means we cannot do much with them. Are there beaver in this area or a large group of trees? Ours started out a small area, but because the beaver have moved in several times and past rainny summers it more like a 9 acre lake now. Wet lands are a delicate thing. They are a world of their own. We have not only waterfowl in ours but there are linx and bobcat up in the swamp and a bear up there. Is your wetlands part of any county water table? If so farm animal manure wll not be allowed. I know that grasses around wetlands are very rich in nutrients. How big is your wetland area actually? Do some research. Contact your local DEC. They can tell you if if it is a protected wetland and what you can do with it. We love ours. In the spring the frogs and peepers come out by the thousands. The water fowl have their babies and the swamp merigolds and swamp iris come out. I hope this has helped a little.
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Call the nearest Government FSA office, and they can either tell you , or put you in touch with the Soil and Water Conservation District office, who can tell you exactly what is allowed and what isn't.
    It's very possible to get yourself into a peck of trouble without even trying.
    I could give you my opinion, but it wouldn't count for much in court.
     
  4. nana-san

    nana-san Well-Known Member

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    The posters offer good advice. Contact DEC in your area ask to speak to someome from natural resources. We are also looking at parcel with river frontage and creek frontage. The folks I have dealt with at DEC in NY and the Soil and Water Dept have been fantastic. return emails within hours of my phone call, copies of wetland maps etc. Part of the creek is federally protected but no matter because we do not intend on changing anything.

    If you are in the NY area I can pass along info that poster MWHIT has sent me.

    We have done extensive research for the last 90 days plus family have gone up and walked the parcels for us.
    Good luck
     
  5. Pink_Carnation

    Pink_Carnation Well-Known Member

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    Knowing what your state laws are is important...most exceed federal. You might not be able to even have animals within 100ft. If it is in Washington I would run the other way.
     
  6. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    DUCK RANCH! or maybe frogs? just outa curiosity why would live stock manure be a bigger deal than wildlife manure?
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    If it's a wetland that is under regulation, one would not likely be able to have a domestic duck 'ranch'. As for frogs, my guess is you would be limited by the game laws as to how many in that wetland you could harvest, and also not bring in any that aren't endemic to that wetland area.

    Why domestic stock manure is a 'bigger deal'?
    Best guess is that endemic wildlife in that wetland have endured eons with their wildlife manure and ecosystem. Domestic manure addition to that might transmit disease to wildlife, and in fact, some wildlife or life in that wetland might transmit disease to the domestic stock.
     
  8. jross

    jross swamper

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    Because there is more of it to pollute, whereas wildlife manure is less in volume?
     
  9. Pink_Carnation

    Pink_Carnation Well-Known Member

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    The wildlife has more lobyists in Washington DC :rolleyes:
     
  10. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like a great place for a jazz club.