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Discussion Starter #1
I have the option to get wet brewer's grain fresh from a local brewery to feed my broiler birds and feeder pigs. Should I do it? The brewer says it's only heirloom oats & barley. I imagine it would spoil quickly. Is this beneficial at all? I am currently feeding whey,apples,and swine mix grain that is 15% protein. I've heard of it being good for ruminants, but I don't know about pigs and poultry. Any advice/experience? Thanks!
 

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Well, I can finally give an opinion on here from real experience. We picked up 3-6 barrels every week all summer long. We feed it to broilers, layers, and feeder pigs. The broilers we started on starter feed for first 3-4 weeks and then feed brewers only. They did finish but it took about 12-14 weeks instead of 8. They also had fresh pasture everyday. The layers, we fed it only, they took 7-8 months to lay and still only got about 10-12 eggs out of 35 layers. The pigs were the animals we were trying to save the most on. We feed tons of it to them but we also gave 16% ration on top of it. They only liked it the first day or two but it was summer also. After we butchered them at 7 months and about 250lbs I decided to call the feed mill and see what are summer total was for the pig feed. We fed 3500 lbs to 5 pigs. That is almost right on what you should feed a pig to get to weight. Plus, we gave scraps. So, our opinion after driving all summer which cost us about 20 bucks a week, is that it is not worth it. Maybe if we did a better job of figures during the summer we would have known what we were doing. We are new to livestock so we are chalking that up to experience! haha. Also, since then we have switched our layers over to layer feed and egg production has shot up! We can buy feed cheaper than we were driving. That is our experience with it. Others on here will have the nutritional value and info that is above our heads at this point but the proof to us is trying it. Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! this helps a lot. I think we'll stick with the whey.
 

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The spent barley we get is good stuff. I wish I could get a whole lot more and regularly. Pigs and poultry both love it and it's go so fast it never spoils. It will spoil in hot weather if you leave it out. If you can't feed it out quickly, spread it to dry and it keeps better. I would suggest not going over 25% of their ration and if you see it coming out the back end, back off to less. it's high in protein, low in energy (calories), high in fiber, good minerals. The yeast is good too. We solve the transport issue by back hauling rather than going to get it - that is to say we pick it up at the end of our delivery route. Our truck gets about the same gas mileage empty or full. Run full.

-Walter

See:
http://www.sugarmtnfarm.com/?s=barley
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The spent barley we get is good stuff. I wish I could get a whole lot more and regularly. Pigs and poultry both love it and it's go so fast it never spoils. It will spoil in hot weather if you leave it out. If you can't feed it out quickly, spread it to dry and it keeps better. I would suggest not going over 25% of their ration and if you see it coming out the back end, back off to less. it's high in protein, low in energy (calories), high in fiber, good minerals. The yeast is good too. We solve the transport issue by back hauling rather than going to get it - that is to say we pick it up at the end of our delivery route. Our truck gets about the same gas mileage empty or full. Run full.

-Walter

See:
http://www.sugarmtnfarm.com/?s=barley
thank you Walter, always good advice. That's a good idea about drying it. We have been wanting to build a drying shack for the apple pommace we get from the local cidery. I am hoping to find an small,old metal storage shed paint it black and build drying racks in it. We have just been spreading the pommace on tarps in the sun. This is time intensive and ruined by rain though.
 

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I've been feeding it to my pigs...not sure if it helps them grow faster but its nice for the sows to be fed "more." 5 lbs grain feed is all they need a day, but they claim to still be hungry so they can eat more without getting fat. I also think it helps their digestion: fiber is a good thing. Poop breaks down faster, smells less.

i've switched back to feeding mash to my pigs so i mix the wet grain in with the mash. It seems the top layer molds if it sits. if it gets mixed twice a day it doesn't mold so quick. i go through 400 lbs a week.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've been feeding it to my pigs...not sure if it helps them grow faster but its nice for the sows to be fed "more." 5 lbs grain feed is all they need a day, but they claim to still be hungry so they can eat more without getting fat. I also think it helps their digestion: fiber is a good thing. Poop breaks down faster, smells less.

i've switched back to feeding mash to my pigs so i mix the wet grain in with the mash. It seems the top layer molds if it sits. if it gets mixed twice a day it doesn't mold so quick. i go through 400 lbs a week.
Thank you! How many pigs are going though 400lbs. per week?
 

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I just made a batch of feed with 7.5% of mix being dried distillers grains after reading a PDF file from U of Purdue, they recommend 10% or less due to such a fine particulate size causing ulcers.

As for the wet or spent brewers grains I don't believe I would bother seeing how much work and the quantity it would require and the low nutritional value for non ruminant livestock. But it apparently can be part of their diet.

Protein value

Brewers grain have a good protein value for ruminants and their protein is less ruminally degradable than that of other plant-derived feeds. Brewers grains are thus often used in ruminant productions with high requirements in by-pass protein, such as high-yielding dairy cows. The effective nitrogen degradability of brewers grains reported in feed tables and in the scientific literature is about-41-49% (Sauvant et al., 2004-;Batajoo et al., 1998-;-Nishiguchi et al., 2005-;-Volden, 2011-;-Promkot et al., 2007). These values are lower than those of soybean meal and cereal by-products (Sauvant et al., 2004;-Volden, 2011;-Nishiguchi et al., 2005), though in one case the protein of distillers dried grains was found less degradable (Batajoo et al., 1998). Nitrogen degradability depends on the amount of heat used during the drying process: in one experiment, the amount of protein by-pass doubled when temperature rose from 50° to 135°C (Pereira et al., 1998). Heating also decreases protein solubility while increasing the insoluble ADF-bound nitrogen fraction-(Enishi et al., 2005). Values for the intestinal digestibility of nitrogen range from 74% (Yue Qun et al., 2007) to 84% (Sauvant et al., 2004), which is much lower than the values reported by these authors for soybean meal, corn gluten meal and maize distillers grains (> 90%). As usual for cereal grains and their by-products, lysine is the first limiting amino acid in brewers grains used for high yielding ruminants, so it needs to be blended with sources of by-pass protein richer in lysine.

Pigs

Brewers grains can be fed to pigs, but their high fibre content and the low quality of the protein, which is deficient in lysine, threonine and tryptophan, make them more suitable to pigs with low energy requirements such as gestating sows and boars, rather than to growing pigs and lactating sows, particularly in intensive production systems (Holden et al., 1991;-Blair, 2007;-Boessinger et al., 2005). Brewers grains are usually fed dried to pigs, as they are easier to store and more stable (Blair, 2007;-Crawshaw, 2004), but they are also fed wet or ensiled (Boessinger et al., 2005).


All this info is found here.-- http://www.feedipedia.org/node/74
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was able to get the analysis from this specific brewers grain.

Here is the nutrient analysis of our Brewer's Grain please contact me asap if you are Interested in this as a feed possibility.
> 1. Protein 25.3%
> 2. soluble protein 3.6%
> 3. ADF protein 2.83%
> 4. NDF protein.64%
> 5. ADF fiber 24.3%
> 6. NDF fiber 45.2%
> 7.CHO sugar 3.3%
> 8. Water soluble sugar 4.2%
> 9. Crude Fat 3.49
> 10. TDN 74.4%
> 11. Net energy lactation mcal/lb 0.79


I am not an animal nutritionalist, so this doesn't mean much to me.

Woodsman, thank you for the info. Is distiller's grain different from brewer's?
 

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I'm not an expert on it, but yes, (whiskey etc.) distillers grains (mostly corn mash) is exposed to live yeast organisms and is fermented whereas (beer) spent brewers grains (oats, barley, wheat etc.) mash does not come in contact or ferment with the yeast. I believe fermentation changes the nutritional profile, think Vegemite which is popular in Australia on toast etc. The "lees" leftover from fermenting the beer wort is nutritional but not part of the spent brewers grains normally as the lees would contain the "house yeast" which may be what makes one beer special over others of the same type, so it may be protected from leaving the brewery.

Lazy J(?) on here is a feed consultant maybe he will share what he knows?
 

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I can't speak for everyone here in Alaska, but the worry Im hearing this winter is regarding how frozen it will get. It's generally regarded as low quality- high fiber mostly. But folks who get it are pondering how to keep it thawed enough to shovel. I'm not going to burn the gas to pick up a fiber ration I have to work at to feed.
 

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I wouldn't go out of my way for it either but if its on the way and could be easily mixed in with other feed I might do it on a tight budget. We all do what we need to get by sometimes.

I'm not sold on using dried distillers grain yet either, I'm paying close attention to this batch of feed and the condition of the pigs.
 

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400 lbs for 7 "adult" pigs and 9 piglets a week. techincally the adults should get 5or 6 lbs grain a day. that make my 700 lbers grumpy and hungry. My pasture is spent and frozen over, so thats not an option. I give then 5 lbs of the good stuff and 2 or 3 lbs of brewers grain in the morning, then alfalfa at night. hummm...life aint so bad for them.
 

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400 lbs for 7 "adult" pigs and 9 piglets a week. techincally the adults should get 5or 6 lbs grain a day. that make my 700 lbers grumpy and hungry. My pasture is spent and frozen over, so thats not an option. I give then 5 lbs of the good stuff and 2 or 3 lbs of brewers grain in the morning, then alfalfa at night. hummm...life aint so bad for them.
Sounds purdy good to me!
 

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Thanks for the links, Walter. I wondered how the nutrients jumped compared to the original grain they started with. I hadn't given mycotoxins a thought but now see they can be threefold also! I doubt I will use ddgs or sbg again considering that fact alone. The reward isn't worth the risk.
 
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