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The bad thing about big standing dead trees is that they will sometimes hold fire for a long time and then emit embers that will restart a forest fire. No they don't burn as hot as pine sap, which does not burn as hot as eucalyptus sap, but they are good for starting fires and restarting fires.

Big timber is old timber. Young timber is better at resisting disease and pests. Young timber will produce more mast crops, which feed more herbivores to keep the understory clean. Insect pests like old trees with deep bark grooves and dead limbs and injuries/rot here and there. Big timber is not a problem when it is wisely turned into building materials, furniture, fuel, mulch or paper. But when it just stands there, because some people foolishly think that we live in a world that no longer exists, it is a threat.

Forests can't be managed based on what was, they have to be managed based on what is.
 

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Looks like either the county or the power company is being more proactive this year. Tree trimming service out in force on the country roads the last few days. We were out working on our irrigation and counting trees we need to take out at the new property and they stopped by asking if they could take down some palm trees on the property where the power line runs to the house. Absolutely, said we (don't need no stinkin' palm tree torches and those things are scary to try to take out yourelf).
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Nothing can stop a crown fire. If wildfires had categories like hurricane's a crown fire would be a cat 7.

Eliminating the underbrush will most of the time keep it from getting too the tree tops.
I understand the under brush thing.

Would thinning trees make it less likely to have a "crown fire"?
 

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Discussion Starter #107
I already answered that question.
It us useless trying to have a discussion with you. It always quickly devolves into your dogmatic approach.
 

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Tree huggers don't allow economical harvest of timber.

Nothing to do with that. First there are not enough logging contractors to harvest the billions of cubic metres of bug killed wood. There are not enough mills to process it. And if you did the glut on the market would bankrupt the logging companies.
 

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@keenataz,
We spoke before once upon a time (when I was someone else here) about forestry and bark beetles. I've come to respect what you have to say.
Anyway. I'm curious as to your thoughts on the beetle populations in relation to the disrupted natural wildfire cycle in the PNW. My personal thoughts are that it's possible the bark beetle population has exploded because it has not been kept in check by the natural fire cycle in the West. A vicious cycle so to speak. Some species of beetle are native and some are not. Maybe the fire suppression has caused the beetle populations to explode, which kills trees and creates even more fuel for fires. What's your opinion here?
I think the chief cause is two fold. The warmer winters not killing the beetles. And yes the old growth forest which is their primary target.

This infestation was different however, it also attacked immature timber, which it had not done before. By doing this it not only killed trees for this harvest rotation, but for the next 50 years.

So yes I agree
 

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Would proper forest management thin the trees via logging?
Again not economical. Would it work? It might. But when a big forest fire gets going, it can send sparks a couple of kilometres to spread.
 

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I think the chief cause is two fold. The warmer winters not killing the beetles. And yes the old growth forest which is their primary target.

This infestation was different however, it also attacked immature timber, which it had not done before. By doing this it not only killed trees for this harvest rotation, but for the next 50 years.

So yes I agree
The cycle of drought and not enough winter cold is what has stressed the trees enough to allow the increased ingestion here. Is it the same there?
 
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