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I think we're really getting our act together with our goats -- or at least, we are going to as soon as possible for sure. We're going out of town for a few weeks, but as soon as we come back -- bam. All of those things we've put off for later -- will be NOW.
What we're going to do:

Sell Bella, a doeling we postponed selling and is now six months old. It's TIME.

Sell Rocky, a 7 week buckling. We didn't postpone it, but it'll be time.

Deworm all of our goats. And dogs. They're looking a bit thin, so just in case.

De-cocci all our goats. Same reason as above.

De-worm and -cocci our dogs. Not goat chores, but still necessary.


That's a lot to do, but it'll be worth it in the long run! :)
 

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You shouldn't have to treat adults for cocci except in extremely unusual circumstances. It's expensive and futile - Adult goats will have a normal load of coccidia, and be totally unaffected by it. It is likely not the reason for any of your animals to be thin. They have an immune system to take care of it - kids do not develop immunity for around 6 months, which is why we do prevention. One thing you can do which is not really going to benefit the adults either way, but may help your kid crop (if dam raised) is to use a rumensin medicated feed in your does 4-6 weeks prior to kidding. This will lower the number the adults are shedding into the environment where the kids pick it up.

Please do worm fecals before randomly deworming goats, especially right as we enter fall/winter. Otherwise next spring the worms that survive in your goats (possibly resistant to your dewormer) will start to reproduce in spring right before your new goat kids are put on pasture. It's a quick way to have dewormer resistance. Deworm if some need it (based on egg number, famancha, fecal consistency, and body condition) but avoid deworming everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You shouldn't have to treat adults for cocci except in extremely unusual circumstances. It's expensive and futile - Adult goats will have a normal load of coccidia, and be totally unaffected by it. It is likely not the reason for any of your animals to be thin. They have an immune system to take care of it - kids do not develop immunity for around 6 months, which is why we do prevention. One thing you can do which is not really going to benefit the adults either way, but may help your kid crop (if dam raised) is to use a rumensin medicated feed in your does 4-6 weeks prior to kidding. This will lower the number the adults are shedding into the environment where the kids pick it up.

Please do worm fecals before randomly deworming goats, especially right as we enter fall/winter. Otherwise next spring the worms that survive in your goats (possibly resistant to your dewormer) will start to reproduce in spring right before your new goat kids are put on pasture. It's a quick way to have dewormer resistance. Deworm if some need it (based on egg number, famancha, fecal consistency, and body condition) but avoid deworming everything.
Wow, thanks for the info. That's really helpful! :) I never knew that.
 
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