Wedding rose cuttings?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Sarah K., Jun 2, 2005.

  1. Sarah K.

    Sarah K. Well-Known Member

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    Central NYS
    Hi Everyone,
    I'm getting married in a couple weeks and I'm wondering about the viability of trying to make a cutting from a rose from my bouquet (or possibly a graft onto another rosebush?) The lady we're getting the flowers from says it won't be possible but I thought I'd heard of such things being done so I thought I'd check here first. Does anyone know if it's worth a try and if so, what's the best way?
    Thanks,
    Sarah K. (who isn't going to be Sarah "K." anymore in a few weeks!) :)
     
  2. kentuckyhippie

    kentuckyhippie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have rooted rose cuttings by cutting off the flower head at the first joint then cutting the bottom of the stem just above the last joint at an angle. stick the bottom into a small irish potato and plant it in a partly sunny spot in the yard. Put a glass jar over it to act as a kind of mini greenhouse. keep it watered and keep the jar over it until it begins sprouting new leaves. I have had good luck doing this Usually at least two thirds of my cuttings root.
     

  3. Becky H.

    Becky H. Well-Known Member

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    Mississippi
    Congrats to you on your marriage and what a sweet sentimental thing to do with the rose.

    Yes, it's possible. My mother-in-law did one as well. Has a beautiful red rose bush from a singular rose.

    This is how my gardening book (Organic Gardening/Rodale 1978) says to do it:

    "Start in protected place where they will receive morning sun only. After taking off bottom leaves leaving 2 nodes (joints) put in soil and firm soil around them. Put peat moss around soil at their base then cover with glass jar firmly in place. Then water well with a light spray from the hose. It is rarely necessary to water them because the moisture which condenses in the jar will keep them sufficiently wet. New shoots will appear in 3-4 weeks. Jars are not removed until the cuttings have sufficient roots to supply moisture to the leaves, this may not be until the following spring."

    I wouldn't recommend moving it from it's "morning sun only" spot until it has substantial growth and would do it early spring 2007 not spring 2006. Good luck.
     
  4. rannie

    rannie Well-Known Member

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    Congrats! and what a beautiful idea! And yes it can be done my mother-in-law has so many rose bushes and they all come from the roses that her children give her for all the different occassions. She just finds a good spot in the yard works the ground alittle and cuts the bottom of the stem at an angle waters it and says leave it alone next year it will sprout. she says even if it looks dead leave it alone. I always just thought she has the greenest thumb in the world. her yard is awesome. Rannie
     
  5. momanto

    momanto SW FLORIDA HAPPYLAND

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    I Used This Method With The Glass Over The Rose Cutting. After Several Months It Was Still Growing. A Friend From Town Came Over One Day With Her Dd's And They And My Dd Had A Great Time Out In The Yard Playing. Several Days Later I Noticed Someone Had Removed The Glass From The Cutting And It Was Dead. Dd Told Me Which Little Impy Girl Did It. As I Had Found The Glass Out With Their Yard Toy-stuff. The Cutting Was The Rose On The Communion Table At Church Honoring The Recent Birth Of Our Ds. Since, Of Course, I Was In The Hospital And Didnt Get To See It In Church, A Great Aunt Had Brought It To Me.

    Was Greatly Ticked Off At That Kid. But Ds In Alive And Well At 39, & Has Always Been A Joy.
     
  6. Sarah K.

    Sarah K. Well-Known Member

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    Central NYS
    Thanks, everyone, for your responses! I'm really glad to hear this is a possiblity. We'll be trying this in SE PA- will the rosebushes be able to survive long-term? My understanding is that commercially grown rosebushes are usually grafted onto hardy rootstock and I think my parents did have one rosebush die all the way back to the ground during a really bad winter (I forget if it came up again as the rootstock type or the graft type). Should we consider maybe grafting it onto something else when the plant is established enough to make a good cutting, or giving it extra protection in the winter?
     
  7. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    This is so neat, I was coming on here to post a question and clicked on to this topic, because, today I'm putting the rose under a jar in the yard that my son handed me at his graduation. :cool: What a special way to remember those we love.