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Discussion Starter #1
I've got two kid goats who I've neglected to wean yet and I'm ready to dry up their doe for the year.

How long do I need to keep the kids separated from their mother in order for her to dry up? And is there anything I need to do in order to make it a less difficult experience for her?
 

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Why do you feel that you need to wean them? Letting them nurse will not hurt anythign if you don't need or want the milk.

I let mine nurse for 6, 7, even 8 months. They grow better that way, and the doe weans them herself when she gets bred back.
 

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From personal experience: Not all does will wean their own kids when its time to dry off in preparation of the next kidding.
Some kids take longer than others to completely wean. Some its just a matter of a few weeks, some it can be a year, literally, before they don't try to nurse every chance they get. Its a big help if Mom decides not to let them nurse when they are re-introduced.....but some does fall right back into motherhood even if the kid is as tall as they are! :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't have a good answer as to why I think they should be weaned. Maybe because Storey's guide tells me too. :) I've been worried about the mother being too thin, but she's getting plenty of hay/grain/forage so I don't think they're going to nurse her to death. (Can they?)

This is her first batch, and she's getting pretty tired of letting them nurse. I had intended to milk her but just can't seem to fit it into the farm schedule very well. It wouldn't hurt my feelings any to let them go about another month and then try milking again and see if my life hasn't settled down enough to make that work out.

I guess overall I'm just worried about the mother.
 

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It won't hurt the dam for them to nurse unless they're big strapping bucklings with orns that are bruising her udder and lifting her rear end up off the ground when they nurse. In that case, I would eat them!

If they are does, I'd let them nurse, they will grow out better. If one or both are bucklings, butcher the bucklings. They will be tender and tasty from being milk fed. :)

I have heard of doelings nursing their dams after they themselves have kidded as yearlings, but have never yet seen it in my herd. I don't know what I would do in that case. My general experience is that trying to seperate and wean them often produces anxiety and causes the kid to want to nurse even more, especially if they're only 2-3 months old.

Hey, how old are these kids, anyway? ;)
 
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