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Retired Coastie
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.easywean.com.au/cattle.htm

I realize there are many similar products on the market, but do they really work? Here's my problem, my nurse cow is so good at her profession that she is more than happy to let any and all calves nurse on her. She's dry, I have four willing calves. They have been separated for months, each time I re-unite she rings the dinner bell. Separating the cow from the calves doubles my chores and many other complications with 17 goats to manage. So enough talking will the device work and will it work on 300 pound plus calves? Thanks for any input and if you could mention the one you have used sucessfully (which company)....Thanks again.....Topside
 

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Retired Coastie
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good read Agman....one more thing I should have added to my thread, this cow did not act as a nurse cow with the mentioned calves. She is just a natural nurse cow who is trying to feed the world....love her....Topside.
 

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We put weaning rings on all my step-dad's calves because he had a cow that wanted to adopt them all. They figured out how to nurse around them. She let them. They were the type that had a large flap that hung from the nose - not the crown type
 

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Retired Coastie
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input farmmom, just got to ask though. I'm guessing crown type have spikes and your step dad just tried large flat plate type, without spikes? Topside
 

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We used one like that on a 1 yr old hereford heifer that thought the jersey was her mother, and being the jersey let her she thought it was okay.

Just make sure you get it tight enough so they can't pull them out but loose enough so that if they flip it up in the air, it will not stay there and will fall back down on it's own.

With some calves it helps to put the spikes outward so it pokes the cow so she'll kick them off.
 

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I have never used a weaning ring, but I do use nurse cows and if you have a good one, I don't think I would put weaning rings on the calves if they are going to poke on her udder and make her think twice about taking more calves when she freshens.
 

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We tried those weaning rings years ago. Every calf eventually learned to get around it. We decided they were a waste of time.
 

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I put two of those in a couple of the Beef cross heifers calves that were sucking the other heifers. They worked great...until they came out. I replaced one but again, I didn't put it in tight enough and it came out again. The other one was lost the first time it came out. I purchased some cheaper ones that are similar but not as many spikes and a bit smaller. They go in the noses of the original two and the other two I spotted who are nursing each other.
I'll be a bit tougher this time and make sure they are tight enough to stay in. They worked for what we needed.
There are those that have success with the weaning rings and nurse cows...and there are those that don't.
I figure the things are cheap enough it is worth a shot.
 

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Thanks for the input farmmom, just got to ask though. I'm guessing crown type have spikes and your step dad just tried large flat plate type, without spikes? Topside
That is correct. He couldn't stand the way the spiked ones looked. I thought they might work better, but he wanted to try the others. We also had trouble keeping them on, no matter how tight they were, within a day or so, they would be off. We'd catch them and put them back on. I did see them nursing with them on though.
 

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Retired Coastie
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes it is a cheap experiment, thanks for all the input....the solution to most of my problems are to drop off some at the dairy auction. My remaining problem is my freezer steer who will be watching sunsets for another year. The cow is dry however I'm worried about udder damage/infection. Roseanna do you remember the name brand of the ones you tried? Thanks
 

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The two yellow 0nes in the picture are the exact ones you posted, but I ordered them from Jeffers. The green ones that I have not put in their noses yet, I ordered from Valey Vet. They are slightly smaller so I hope they will work better for these heifers. I just happened to be placing an order with Valley Vet instead of Jeffers so ordered the ones they carry.
 

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Udderly Happy!
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http://www.easywean.com.au/cattle.htm

I realize there are many similar products on the market, but do they really work? Here's my problem, my nurse cow is so good at her profession that she is more than happy to let any and all calves nurse on her. She's dry, I have four willing calves. They have been separated for months, each time I re-unite she rings the dinner bell. Separating the cow from the calves doubles my chores and many other complications with 17 goats to manage. So enough talking will the device work and will it work on 300 pound plus calves? Thanks for any input and if you could mention the one you have used sucessfully (which company)....Thanks again.....Topside
Topside! I'm glad to know that someone else out there has one of those "world feeders". I have a four year old nurse cow that has fed and is still feeding most of the cows and calves in the pasture. She is gentle and motherly. She does milk off her back though. I hope you get the feeder rings figured out. I may have to try some.
 

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For the sake of me just wean the calf, take its mother away , have it eating grain, hay ect and the weaning process is over in a couple of days of bawling. I have raised beef and dairy cattle all my life since I was raised on a real working farm.
You are just wasteing your time and $ buying them weaning rigs, use the $ for more important things
 

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Retired Coastie
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gregg, these calves are seperated, they have been for 6 months. The cow is dry and has been for nearly a year. Each time I unite them into the same paddock the younger/older calves are invited to nurse. So I just separate them again, it's getting old and doubles chores...It's not even the cows calves, the cow is dry. These calves have never sucked a drop of milk from her. As Francis mention she's trying to feed the world.....I'm trying to avoid damage to her udder...Do you have any advice?.....Topside
 
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