We may have found our Jersey Milk Cow!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by BertaBurtonLake, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    I am trying not to get too excited here, but we may have found our long sought after Jersy. I called a man who had a Jersey in the paper 2 weeks ago and just missed the cow he had listed. Apparently, he liked me and felt my desire for a milk cow, so he called a few minutes ago with another cow he had found. This cow has (according to him) negative Johnnes and brucellocis. She is not quite 4 years old being born July 8, 2002. She has a jersey heifer (not her own) at side and has been bred back to a black angus bull. At first blush, I am REALLY excited about this! He is asking $1050 for the bred back cow in milk with the calf at side. He says she hand milks beautifully and comes to him when he sits on his porch. I have yet to see this cow and calf, but we are going early tomorrow morning to see her and the calf. He is planning to milk her while we are there.

    Besides substantiation of negative Johnnes and Brucellisis, what other things do I need to know?

    Is a woven wire fence adequate for now? We plan to fence additional acreage in the next month with board fencing with woven wire.

    We have 3 mature Katadhins with lambs. Would there be a problem running the sheep and lambs together with the cow and calf? I have read and heard that they can be run together as they have different grazing patterns, but I just want to be sure.

    Thanks for any advice and help with any or all of my questions. This board ROCKS with information!

    -(hopefully, soon to be milk cow owner) ~Berta
     
  2. mamalisa

    mamalisa Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    You may find that your cow becomes protective of your sheep.....I use dogs to move my sheep and instead of going where Hope tells them, they run and hide behind the cow, who then chases the dog.......very funny but kind of aggravating.

    My critters stay behind woven wire. A strand of barb wire on top will convince the young'uns not to try and walk over the fence.


    If you have free range chickens, be prepared for them to use the cows as a portable shelter when it rains.
     

  3. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

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    Berta, you are totally allowed to be excited! That is a great deal, I am so happy for you!

    Looking forward to hearing of their arrival!

    Melissa
     
  4. cowgirlracer

    cowgirlracer Well-Known Member

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  5. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    The Ultimate chicken tractor - moves to new grass on a regular basis, and comes back to the barn twice a day for feeding! LOL.