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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is not a solid cast iron, free standing oven. it will be a built-in, installed by a mason.

we are building our off-grid "dream house" on our newly purchased 10 acre homestead. some of you have probably seen my construction posts about the basement and foundation work.

we are still many months away from anything that looks like a house. We have several large purchases that will not be included in the home construction loan. examples include this oven, a second propane oven, two wood heating stoves, a propane tank, dishwasher, mini-split HVAC and built-in microwave.

and now some photos:

Cabinetry Handle Sleeve Door Rectangle


Furniture Table Interior design Shelf Shelving
Rectangle Wood Floor Fixture Flooring
 
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As pictured - how in the world does it meet code?
 
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I'm on lifetime homesteading project number 5, all in Indiana and Michigan.
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Looks great! What brand is it? Do I assume correctly that you're in the US? From my experience with cooking with wood ranges, the entire secret is having consistent, dependable fuel. You'll need good kindling, of course, that will catch easily and burn hot enough to ignite your main fuel. Depending on your area, you'll probably want to find a source of dense wood like maple, hickory, oak, or beech. Other, less common species work well, too, like ironwood and osage orange. You'll want this stove fuel to be a good length for feeding the fire box, and small enough so you can put several sticks or a layer of sticks on top of coals and embers to keep the temperature even. Because the fuel will be relatively thin, it will take a very good quantity of it to meet your needs whenever you want to use the range/oven. Proper firewood is cured, that is, dried out of the rain long enough for the pieces to check on the ends and have some ring to them. Strike two pieces of damp wood together and they go 'thud.' Strike two pieces of cured hardwood together, and they almost ring. If you have mixed species and can't tell them apart, the results of fires with them will vary. Curing thin wood can vary, but even if finely split, expect it to take six months or more. The time of year it's cut matters, too.
On the range top, you can cook a little longer (if you don't mind waiting) if the fire doesn't come up or stay up well. In the oven, things like pot roasts and stewed chicken can be extended, but it's when you bake or roast things that require a steady, high temperature that you'll earn your bars.
I don't consider it wrong to have an alternate means to heat small quantities of things quickly. A gas or propane laundry stove or even camp stove for heating tea water or making some breakfast is perfectly fine. When you want high heat for something like coffee, that means heating up the entire range/oven to do it, and that puts more heat into the house, too. That's a good thing in the winter time and on the shoulders of winter, but somebody has to get up way before the others to get it done. Cooking with wood or coal will bring a whole new perspective.
You'll want to get in the habit of emptying the ash drawer regularly. What's going to happen to the fire when you pull the ash drawer out and go to the back door with it? Don't let the ashes build up enough so that the grates in the firebox rest in the hot coals. That's how grates get warped.
Please keep us informed! May your learning curve be favorable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As pictured - how in the world does it meet code?
not entirely certain about your question, but I assume you are referencing the "lack" of a chimney.

it does have a chimney. it is hidden inside the wall. that black, iron square you see above the oven, on the wall, to the right side, is some sort of chimney baffle, or flow control.

also, to be clear, the photos are not of our install, in our house. our house is still in the earliest stages of construction.
 

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I've never seen, or heard of, a woodburning appliance that had zero clearance to combustibles.
It looks like ceramic tile on the surrounding cabinetry, and I suppose the tile could be laid on a cement board. One would presume that the cement board would be screwed to wooden structural members, but maybe the structure is masonry?
 

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Cooking tip. My Grandmother always kept what she called "Pancake wood" on hand. It was hardwood, cut almost to the size of kindling. It lit up fast, and burned hot. She would remove two of the stove lids, and place the griddle over the openings. Her pancake wood, got the griddle hot enough for perfect pancakes. And after breakfast she would add larger splits of wood to hold the heat for the oven. She made pancakes, and then baked something every day.

She raised fourteen kids, and fed them all with a Home Comfort cook stove. Then she fed a wagon load of grandkids with that same stove.
 

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For baking in the wood cookstove, I have three suggestions:

1.) Practice

2.) Practice

3.) Practice

It is so different from electric or gas ranges, and requires more attention. Turn your baked goods frequently, and keep a watchful eye.

You will learn the "hot" and "cold" spots of the cook top, as well as the oven.

It took me about a year to get to the point where I could bake butter cookies without incinerating them, but just a few months to figure out how to move things around on the top to utilize the wide range of temperatures.

I wish you all the best in your adventures with your wood cookstove!
 
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anytime you are trying to control your heat , lots of kindling and small wood is handy also very dry wood

when a fire box is 16 inches far to many people make the mistake of cutting the wood 16 inches

12-14 will let you load easier
also have some cut 2-4 inches shorter than your fire box is wide

as well as some 1/2 the length of your fire box

variety is good I know it doesn't stack as well but it gives you options and gets going better than too much big wood
 

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The only thing I know about cooking on a wood stove is that you move your pan around on the top to find the right heat for whatever you happen to be cooking.. I've only cooked on my wood stove that was for heating the house. If you have a real cook stove, then the round lids come off and heavy cast iron pots fit down into the hole in the top of the stove.

That looks like a glass top stove, which means it is electric and not wood fired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The only thing I know about cooking on a wood stove is that you move your pan around on the top to find the right heat for whatever you happen to be cooking.. I've only cooked on my wood stove that was for heating the house. If you have a real cook stove, then the round lids come off and heavy cast iron pots fit down into the hole in the top of the stove.

That looks like a glass top stove, which means it is electric and not wood fired.
ummmm... we bought it, so we know what it is. it IS a WOOD fired stove. it is not a glass top.
 
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I was recently reminded of something that is very helpful when you're using a wood cookstove: Corn cobs.

Dry, or soaked in fat or parafin, they're good for firestarters or quick heat.

A few years back, we had a decent corn crop. After we shelled the corn, we kept the cobs in a couple of feed sacks. Some, I soaked in melted sheep fat; left the rest dry. They were so useful!
 
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I'm on lifetime homesteading project number 5, all in Indiana and Michigan.
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I was recently reminded of something that is very helpful when you're using a wood cookstove: Corn cobs.

Dry, or soaked in fat or parafin, they're good for firestarters or quick heat.

A few years back, we had a decent corn crop. After we shelled the corn, we kept the cobs in a couple of feed sacks. Some, I soaked in melted sheep fat; left the rest dry. They were so useful!
That's the good stuff. Use what you have at hand and use it well. We'd all be a lot better off if everyone thought your way.
 

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That's the good stuff. Use what you have at hand and use it well. We'd all be a lot better off if everyone thought your way.
My ex-almost-DIL (man, I miss her!) used to love corn cob jelly.
 
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