Water Shut off bathroom sink

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Carol from Upto, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. Carol from Upto

    Carol from Upto Well-Known Member

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    The water shut off to my bathroom sink is frozen.
    I need to shut it off because the faucet is leaking.
    I can't afford a plumber right now and I don't need the faucet, there is a double sink in the bathroom.
    I am afraid I will break something if I force it.
    How can I free it up?
    Will WD-40 help?
    Thanks
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Yes or PB Blaster

    If you have a pair of channel lock pliers you can try turning it with that after the oil soaks a while

    It may help to turn off the main water to the house until you get it loose just in case something breaks
     

  3. ninny

    ninny Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes if you'll loosen the nut just a little where the handle stem goes into the valve body and then spray some lubricant on it, that will break it loose. Worth a try...

    .
     
  4. Eagle_and_hawk

    Eagle_and_hawk Active Member

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    If it still will not turn, another option is turn off the water at the main, disconnect the hose from the valve and buy a cap at the hardware store to close it off. Probably $1-2, but cheaper than a plumber and if the valve breaks off, you may have to bring in a plumber to replace the valve to turn the water back on.
     
  5. Studhauler

    Studhauler Well-Known Member

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    If the valve does break, take the valve off and cap the line.

    Or instead of even temping fate, turn off the water to the whole house, than take the line off from the valve to the sink. Then put a cap on the valve.
     
  6. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There is always an exception, BUT ... all of the oval valve handles I have had to "unstick" have eventually opened and closed again and not broken. I frequently had to gently but firmly use pliers or channel locks to convince the valve to move. Plumbers grease will lubricate the works if you get it off.

    Definitely turn off the water upstream to the sink valve as a precaution.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2011
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    In the past, I never had a shut off valve on the bathroom or kitchen sink supply lines. I would simply turn the water off to the house when repairing or replacing a fixture. No big deal. Swapping out a fixture or replacing the washers and seat on a faucet takes only a couple hours at the most.
     
  8. Harry Chickpea

    Harry Chickpea Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you have access to dry ice, make a poultice of dry ice and wrap it around the pipe for about six inches. You'll freeze the water into a plug and not need to bother with the valve.
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are turning the valve handle clockwise, right??
     
  10. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    Those valves are made cheaply. I wouldn't use one to turn the water on and off over a long time period. I'd let the faucet drip. You can catch the water and dump it into the toilet tank after you flush the toilet and before the tank completely refills if you don't want to waste the water.
     
  11. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Usually they dont break, they leak. Unless design has changed in last few years, all I've seen use the rubber washers. Well any rubber washer type faucet that hasnt been used in years and years, the washer gets brittle and doesnt seal well. You try to turn the handle and good chance it will give completely.

    I got so disgusted, that any I replaced for myself or anybody else, I told them their choices. I can replace with same thing and it will probably fail when you need it or I can use a less attractive high quality valve that wont fail, either brass or high quality pvc/cpvc. Watch out though, sure there is some rule in various building code where it mandates you use the official chrome plated pot metal piece of garbage that is used everywhere else. Once something stupid like that gets set down in stone in some regulation, forget trying to improve on it or do so at your own risk. Sure insurance companies look for any loophole to avoid paying if something isnt done exactly to code.

    But yea if you need it to work exactly like it exists now, forget the miracle sprays, just go out and buy new valve exactly like old one and new flex hose to connect valve to toilet. Turn off house water supply and replace the valve and hose. The new exact replacement valve and hose will cost less than a can of miracle spray. Then just replace the faulty leaky faucet with a new one. Yea you can fix an old faucet if its genuine brass, not plastic or pot metal. But usually just as easy to buy a completely new faucet to fit your sink. Better to get one with actual valve being brass, with outside decorative covering being whatever you desire. Faucets with plastic/pot metal valve dont have long life span.
     
  12. GoldenCityMuse

    GoldenCityMuse "Slick" Supporter

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    I'm with cabin fever. Don't even install individual shutoffs at sinks or tubs. Especially with the new PEX, you have a single manifold where you shut off each supply line.
     
  13. Carol from Upto

    Carol from Upto Well-Known Member

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    As always, lots of good advice from you all!
    I will let uou know the outcome.
    Many thanks!
     
  14. am1too

    am1too Well-Known Member

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    I turn my water off with the flip of a switch. Then let the pressure off.