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Hello, I'm new to this forum but have been doing some reading...how have i never seen this forum?!?!

I recently purchased 40 acres in the country. I want to build a house on it and get out of the city...desperately.

Well water- I have spoken with some of the local well diggers who say some well water is available but there is a chance if they drill they may not find water. In the even they dont find water I still have to pay up for their services.

Rural water district- They tell me the water line running near my property is at capacity and it would cost me 40 grand to put in a new line.....plus around 5 grand for the meter.......

Stream- i have a fairly large stream/creek running right through my property, I have been out there during all seasons and have never seen it dry or running continuously. Is there a way to convert this stream to a water source for my home?

The well drilling companies tell me that just because there is a year round stream doesnt mean there will be well water available.....cant i just dig a trench and a huge hole near the stream, fill it with sand and use this for a well? I have not yet had the water tested and still do not know if the stream is spring fed or just run off.....about a mile down stream it runs into and is a tributary to a significant river.

Any imput from you water experts would be much appreciated......
 

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Where in the world are you?
 

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Could you give us some idea of what part of what state or province you live in?
 

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My ranch has gravity fed water lines from the creek but we also have established water rights. I think you need to do research to see if there are restrictions on creek water there.

Then you will need a delivery system, storage system and purfication.
 

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sorry, i live in northeast kansas between topeka and kansas city..........
.................Look into a Sling pump . No motor , no electicity , it's pumping capacity depends upon the velocity of the water in the stream . , fordy:cowboy:
 

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If you have a creek on your property - there is a very good chance that your water table is pretty high. It's always best to have your very own, independent water source and a well takes care of that. So, drill and put in a pump and a hand pump too. You will be better off in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you have a creek on your property - there is a very good chance that your water table is pretty high. It's always best to have your very own, independent water source and a well takes care of that. So, drill and put in a pump and a hand pump too. You will be better off in the long run.
that is what i thought! i figured there would be water readily available.....but the drill guys told me the well water was well below the surface and the surface water (creek) was on top of the rock/surface and doesnt mean well water is there........i didnt know what to make of that....
 

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Many states require well drillers to finish drinking water wells in a "protected" aquifer. Generally this means the driller cannot set the well screen in the shallow surficial aquifer (the first zone of saturated material below the ground surface). The reason for this is that surficial aquifers can be easily contaminated by feedlots, septic systems, fertiliztion, etc. Consequently, the driller has to go deeper and install the well in a deeper aquifer below a clay confining (or protective) unit.
 

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For starters, check out:Kansas Department of Agriculture :: Kansas Handbook of Water Rights, via Google. You may have painted yourself into a corner by buying the property without first determining water availability and rights to it. Also, a local well driller may have to record, maybe with a county or state agency, any well driven, and the depth of each. You can approximate the depth of a well to be driven on your property from the recorded depths of those around you.
 

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Discussion Starter #12


here is the stream at its normal level......if this helps with anything.......

could i just collect my own rainwater in an aquifer and then filter it myself?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For starters, check out:Kansas Department of Agriculture :: Kansas Handbook of Water Rights, via Google. You may have painted yourself into a corner by buying the property without first determining water availability and rights to it. Also, a local well driller may have to record, maybe with a county or state agency, any well driven, and the depth of each. You can approximate the depth of a well to be driven on your property from the recorded depths of those around you.
http://www.ksda.gov/appropriation/content/240

"The exception is water used solely for domestic purposes - that is, water primarily used for the household, watering livestock on pasture, or watering up to two acres of lawn and gardens. No permit is needed for that class of water usage."

according to the law im in the clear to use my water for my home......
 

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We use water out of a stream (branch). There are also three wells on the property. One dry, one at 50gal/day max, one iron sulfur water. Oh yeah, we could hook up to country water as well.

There are tricks, but the biggest issues are safety and freeze protection. We filter, de-sediment and chlorinate, and all the drinking and pot water goes through a Big Berkey.

Find out what the laws allow in your neck of the woods. Around here, there are no restrictions, and we have full riparian rights. Once you have that info, come back and post it or PM me. I don't want you to be getting into trouble because of following my instructions.

edit - OK, looks like you are good to go.

Find a spot in the stream where you can safely place a sump pump. Connect it to a 3/4 poly pipe and run power to it. Use the poly pipe to stop the stream from pulling the pump downstream in flooding conditions. Just attach it to a stake or tree.

You have to decide at this point whether to bury the pipe below the frost line, or only use the pump and line in above freezing weather. Both are options, especially if you use large tanks.

Your next job is filtering the sediment. A whole house filter with a five micron filter cart will get a lot of it. Do a net search for "bio-filters and water" for other options. The filtered water then wants to sit in a cistern quietly, so that the sediment will drop out. If you batch process the water, this goes much more easily. Once the sediment is out, the water needs to drop or be pumped through a sanitizer, like an ozone or ultraviolet sanitizer, or into a tank to which you add some chlorine, mixing thoroughly. That water then goes through a final filter for use as household water. Drinking water goes through the additional step of Berkey filters.

To do the job right, you can use two (new) septic tanks for the buried cisterns, or you can use the poly tanks available from TSC. 1,000 gallon tanks are a minimum size. The septic tanks are much larger and allow you to do a processing once a month, and be less concerned with freezing. In a pinch, you can use just one tank for sanitizing and removing sediment.

You can add small pumps just about anywhere in the circuit as needed. I use two of the little Harbor Freight clearwater pumps to do a vertical lift of about 100 feet into a cistern. That first filter will clog quickly, so try to find a way to backflush it or make it real easy to replace it. If you lose a cheap sump pump, big deal. Harbor Freight has them for about $50. No need for expensive submersibles.

The other issue you will have to address is nitrates. If this is a farming area, you may have unacceptably high levels of them, and that requires a special filter. Carbon filters and sediment filters will not remove it.
 

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Welcome fellow Kansan to the forums.

Check out these two sites and make some telephone calls to better learn if there generally is water available rather than just taking the word of a driller, although I expect they are correct.

http://www.kgwa.org/
http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Magellan/WaterWell/index.html

Search the later link for completed wells near yours. Remember that not all wells will be listed, only those drilled after permits were required.
 

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There's ALWAYS a chance they won't hit water when they drill for a well. And if that happens you ALWAYS have to pay. Every well place will tell you that. That's standard. So don't write off the well because they said that. Congrats on your property.
 

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I don't know if a sling pump is the same as a ram pump, but that is another one that doesn't need electricity.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
okay, i checked the map for wells and "Static" water level....(what exactly is that?).........http://drysdale.kgs.ku.edu/kgs/wwc5/wellviewer.cfm if the link wont take you to the part im looking at........let me know

there are two wells (i think, if im reading it right)...shown in color, one is pink, indicating static water level is between 7-27.11, and there is another in purple, indicating static water level is between 27.11 and 46?? am i making sense of this?

exact static for each is 7 and 46

both of these marks on the map are right next to my property.....

what does this mean?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
ok, figured it out....the yield of both wells is between 1 and 1.58, and the depth is ......one is between 100-123 and the other is 123-140.......the static water level is as previously listed.....
 
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